[op-ed] Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

First published in International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) South Asia blog on 3 March 2017.

Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka's Right to Information (RTI) law - by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka’s Right to Information (RTI) law – by Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s new Right to Information (RTI) Law, adopted through a rare Parliamentary consensus in June 2016, became fully operational on 3 February 2017.

From that day, the island nation’s 21 million citizens can exercise their legal right to public information held by various layers and arms of government.

One month is too soon to know how this law is changing a society that has never been able to question their rulers – monarchs, colonials or elected governments – for 25 centuries. But early signs are encouraging.

Sri Lanka’s 22-year advocacy for RTI was led by journalists, lawyers, civil society activists and a few progressive politicians. If it wasn’t a very grassroots campaign, ordinary citizens are beginning to seize the opportunity now.

RTI can be assessed from its ‘supply side’ as well as the ‘demand side’. States are primarily responsible for supplying it, i.e. ensuring that all public authorities are prepared and able to respond to information requests. The demand side is left for citizens, who may act as individuals or in groups.

In Sri Lanka, both these sides are getting into speed, but it still is a bumpy road.

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

During February, we noticed uneven levels of RTI preparedness across the 52 government ministries, 82 departments, 386 state corporations and hundreds of other ‘public authorities’ covered by the RTI Act. After a six month preparatory phase, some institutions were ready to process citizen requests from Day One.  But many were still confused, and a few even turned away early applicants.

One such violator of the law was the Ministry of Health that refused to accept an RTI application for information on numbers affected by Chronic Kidney Disease and treatment being given.

Such teething problems are not surprising — turning the big ship of government takes time and effort. We can only hope that all public authorities, across central, provincial and local government, will soon be ready to deal with citizen information requests efficiently and courteously.

Some, like the independent Election Commission, have already set a standard for this by processing an early request for audited financial reports of all registered political parties for the past five years.

On the demand side, citizens from all walks of life have shown considerable enthusiasm. By late February, according to Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, Director General of the Department of Information, more than 1,500 citizen RTI requests had been received. How many of these requests will ultimately succeed, we have to wait and see.

Reports in the media and social media indicate that the early RTI requests cover a wide range of matters linked to private grievances or public interest.

Citizens are turning to RTI law for answers that have eluded them for years. One request filed by a group of women in Batticaloa sought information on loved ones who disappeared during the 26-year-long civil war, a question shared by thousands of others. A youth group is helping people in the former conflict areas of the North to ask much land is still being occupied by the military, and how much of it is state-owned and privately-owned. Everywhere, poor people want clarity on how to access various state subsidies.

Under the RTI law, public authorities can’t play hide and seek with citizens. They must provide written answers in 14 days, or seek an extension of another 21 days.

To improve their chances and avoid hassle, citizens should ask their questions as precisely as possible, and know the right public authority to lodge their requests. Civil society groups can train citizens on this, even as they file RTI requests of their own.

That too is happening, with trade unions, professional bodies and other NGOs making RTI requests in the public interest. Some of these ask inconvenient yet necessary questions, for example on key political leaders’ asset declarations, and an official assessment of the civil war’s human and property damage (done in 2013).

Politicians and officials are used to dodging such queries under various pretexts, but the right use of RTI law by determined citizens can press them to open up – or else.

President Maithripala Sirisena was irked that a civil society group wanted to see his asset declaration. His government’s willingness to obey its own law will be a litmus test for yahapalana (good governance) pledges he made to voters in 2015.

The Right to Information Commission will play a decisive role in ensuring the law’s proper implementation. “These are early days for the Commission which is still operating in an interim capacity with a skeletal staff from temporary premises,” it said in a media statement on February 10.

The real proof of RTI – also a fundamental right added to Constitution in 2015 – will be in how much citizens use it to hold government accountable and to solve their pressing problems. Watch this space.

Science writer and media researcher Nalaka Gunawardene is active on Twitter as @NalakaG. Views in this post are his own.

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #253: රටවැසියන්ට සවන් දෙන, සංවාදයට රිසි ජනාධිපතිවරයෙක් ඕනෑ කර තිබේ!

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 17 January 2016), I critique the public communications practices President Maithripala Sirisena of Sri Lanka – and call for better listening and more engagement by the head of state.

I point out that Sirisena is in danger of overexposure in the mainstream media, which I call the ‘Premadasa Syndrome’ (as this bad practice was started by President R Premadasa who was in office from 1988 to May 1993). I argue that citizens don’t need to be force-fed a daily dose of presidential activities on prime time news or in the next day’s newspapers. If public documentation is needed, use the official website.

Like other politicians in Sri Lanka, Sirisena uses key social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to simply disseminate his speeches, messages and photos. But his official website has no space for citizens to comment. That is old school broadcasting, not engaging.

This apparent aloofness, and the fact that he has not done a single Twitter/Facebook Q&A session before or after the election, detracts from his image as a consultative political leader.

On the whole, I would far prefer to see a more engaged (yet far less preachy!) presidency. It would be great to have our First Citizen using mainstream media as well as new media platforms to have regular conversations with the rest of us citizens on matters of public interest. A growing number of modern democratic rulers prefer informal citizen engagement without protocol or pomposity. President Sirisena is not yet among them.

See my English essay which covers similar ground: Yahapalanaya at One: When will our leaders ‘walk the talk’? Groundviews.org, 4 January 2016

President Maithripala Sirisena (seated) launched Tell the President service on 8 January 2016 - Photo by Presidential Media Division

President Maithripala Sirisena (seated) launched Tell the President service on 8 January 2016 – Photo by Presidential Media Division

ජනාධිපති මෛත‍්‍රීපාල සිරිසේනගේ පදවි ප‍්‍රාප්තියේ ප‍්‍රථම සංවත්සරය යෙදුණු 2016 ජනවාරි 9 වනදා ජනපතිට කියන්න නම් නව සේවාව ඇරඹුණා.

තැපැල් පෙට්ටි අංක 123 වෙත යොමු කරන ලියුමක් හරහාත්, දුරකථන අංක 1919 හරහාත් ජනතාවට සිය ප‍්‍රශ්න හා ගැටලූ ඉදිරිපත් කළ හැකි බවයි මේ සේවය හඳුන්වා දෙමින් කියැවුණේ. එයට අමතරව ජනපතිගේ නිල වෙබ් අඩවියත් (http://tell.president.gov.lk/), ජංගම දුරකථන ඇප් එකක් හරහාත් විමසීම් හා පැමිණිලි යොමු කළ හැකියි.

මෙය හොඳ අරමුණකින් කරන උත්සාහයක්. ගාල්ලෙන් බිහි වූ දක්ෂ මාධ්‍යවේදියකු වන සජීව විජේවීරත් මෙයට සම්බන්ධයි. ‘යහපාලනයේදී ජනාධිපතිවරයා තනි නොකරමු’ යයි කියමින් තමන් මෙයට දායක වූ සැටි ගැන ඔහුගේ ෆේස්බුක් එකෙන් ගිය සතියේ කෙටි විස්තරයක් පළ කර තිබුණා.

යහපාලන රජයේ මහජන සන්නිවේදන පිළිවෙත් හා ක‍්‍රියාකලාපය ඇගැයීමකට ලක් කරන්නට මෙය හොඳ අවස්ථාවක් යයි මා සිතනවා.

යහපාලනයේ මොන අඩුපාඩු හා විසමතා තිබුණත් භාෂණ නිදහස හා ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස නම් අපට ලැබී තිබෙනවා. එහි ප‍්‍රතිඵලයක් ලෙස අද අපට රටේ ජනපති හා අගමැති දෙපළත්, ඇමතිවරුනුත් නොබියව විවේචනය කළ හැකියි.

මේ නිදහස ගෙවි ගිය වසර පුරා මා රායෝගිකව අත්හදා බැලූවා. රටේ නායකයන් දෙපළ හේතු සහගතව හා කිසිදු දේශපාලන මතවාදී එල්බ ගැනීමකින් තොරව විවේචනය කිරීමට යළිත් හැකි වීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

එහෙත් නායකයන් පොදු අවකාශයේ කැරෙන විවේචන හා වෙනත් අදහස් පළ කිරීම්වලට සංවේදීද? ඔවුන් මේවා ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටිනවාද? ඔවුන්ගේ කාර්යමණ්ඩල රටවැසියන්ගේ සිතුම් පැතුම් ගැන නිවැරදි ප‍්‍රතිශෝෂණයක් ජනපති හා අගමැති දෙපළට ලබා දෙනවාද?

යහපාලනයේ වසරක් ගෙවී ගියද මේවාට පිළිතුරු හරිහැටි පැහැදිලි නැහැ.

රටේ ජනපතිවරයා රටවැසියා සමග සන්නිවේදනය කරන සැටි මා කලෙක සිට අධ්‍යයනය කරනවා. සිරිසේන ජනපතිගේ සන්නිවේදන රටා මේ වන විට පැහැදිලියි.

සිරිසේනගේ මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රකාශයේ (දෙසැම්බර් 2014) 62 වන පිටුවේ මෙසේද සඳහන් වනවා. ‘දියුණු වන සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයත් සමාජ මාධ්‍යයන්හි ව්‍යාප්තියත්, සමාජ යහපතටම හේතු වන පරිදි කළමනාකරණය කර ගැනීම සඳහා මාධ්‍ය සංවර්ධන ප‍්‍රතිපත්තියත් බලගැන්වීමටද කටයුතු කරමි.’

ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති මට්ටමින් ඉදිරියට යාම අවශ්‍යයි. එහෙත් එයට සමාන්තරව ක‍්‍රියාවෙන් ද ආදර්ශයක් දීමට රටේ නායකයාට හැකියි.

රාජ්‍ය නායකයා සන්නිවේදනය කිරීම යනු හැම ජනමාධ්‍යකින්ම හැකි තාක් ඔහුගේ හෝ ඇයගේ ප‍්‍රතිරූපය පිම්බීම නොවෙයි. මේ අතිශය අදුරදර්ශී සම්ප‍්‍රදාය ඇරඹුණේ පේ‍්‍රමදාස ජනාධිපති කාලයේදීයි. රාජ්‍ය හා පෞද්ගලික මාධ්‍ය හරහා අනිවාර්යයෙන්ම දිනපතා ජනපති පුවත් ආවරණය කළ යුතුව තිබුණා. ඒ ගැන රටේ උපහාසාත්මක කතාද එකල පැතිරුණා. ඇත්තටම එය රටටම විහිලුවක් වුණා.

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

එයින් පසුව පත් වූ ජනාධිපතිවරුන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ සහචරයන් ද කළේ පේ‍්‍රමදාස මාවතේම යාමයි (විජේතුංග හැරෙන්නට). එහි අන්තයටම ගියේ මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂයි. මාධ් හරහා අධිආවරණය තුළින් තම නායකයාගේ අගය අඩු වන බව හා මහජන අපරසාදය වැඩි වන බව නායකයා වටා සිටින අය තේරුම් ගත්තේ නැහැ. නැතහොත් තාවකාලික ප‍්‍රමෝදයක් තකා නොදන්නා සේ සිටියා විය යුතුයි.

2015 නොවැම්බරයේ ජනාධිපති මාධ්‍ය ඒකකයේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය අමතා දේශනයක් කිරීමට මට ඇරයුම් කරනු ලැබුවා. එහිදී විවෘත හා විවේචනාත්මක මත දැක්වීමක් කරමින් මා උදක්ම ඉල්ලා සිටියේ ‘පේ‍්‍රමදාස ව්‍යාධියෙන්’ ජනාධිපති සිරිසේන රෝගී වීමට ඉඩ නොතබන ලෙසයි. එසේ වීමේ පෙරනිමිති මා දකින බවද කීවාග

රටේ නායකයා කුමක් කරන්නේද යන්න දැන ගැනීමට රටවැසියන්ට අයිතියක් තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් ඔහු සහභාගි වන හැම මුල්ගල තැබීම, විවෘත කිරීම, අමුත්තන් බැහැ දැකීම හා සෙසු කටයුතු ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මුද්‍රිත හා විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය හරහා ප‍්‍රචාරණය කිරීම අවශ්‍ය නැහැ.

ඕනෑම නම් ඒ සඳහා ජනාධිපති නිල වෙබ් අඩවිය යොදාගත හැකියි. එවිට (කැමති කෙනෙකුට කැමති විටෙක බලන්නට) තොරතුරු හෙළිදරව් කිරීම ඉහළ මට්ටමින් සිදු වෙතත් පත්තර කියවන, ටෙලිවිෂන් බලන ජනයාට ජනපති ගැන පුවත් කන්දරාවක් බලෙන් පැටවෙන්නේ නැහැ.

දිනපතාම සිල්ලර මට්ටමේ ජනපති පුවත් සියලූ මාධ්‍ය හරහා බෙදා නොහැර විටින් විට ජාතික මට්ටමෙන් වැදගත් නිමිති සඳහා පමණක් සියලූ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ජනයාට සමීප වුවොත් එහි අගය වැඩි වන බවත් මගේ කතාවේදි මා අවධාරණය කළා. එහෙත් මේ උපදෙස් පිළි ගත්තාද යන්න මට සැකයි. මාධ්‍ය මෛත‍්‍රීකරණය දිගටම සිදු වන බවක් පෙනෙන නිසා.

ජනාධිපතිවරයාගේ නව මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය ගැනත් මගේ විචාරයක් තිබෙනවා.

2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයෙන් තේරී පත් වූ විගස සිරිසේන ජනපතිවරයා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල හරහා තමන්ට ලැබුණු ස්වේච්ඡා හා නොනිල සහයෝගයට ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ ස්තූති කළා.

එසේම රටේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන පිරිස සමස්ත ජනගහනයෙන් 25%ක් වී, එය තව දුරටත් ටිකෙන් ටික වැඩි වන කාලයක තනතුරට පත් මේ ජනාපතිවරයාට මින් පෙර කිසිදු නායකයකුට නොතිබූ සන්නිවේදන අවස්ථාවක් උදා වී තිබෙනවා. එනම් සෙසු මාධ්‍යවලට සමාන්තරව නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා ද රටවැසියන් සමග සම්බන්ධ වීමටයි.

සෙසු මාධ්‍ය කිසිවකට වඩා නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා සංවාද කිරීමේ විභවය තිබෙනවා. එසේ කිරීමට ජනපතිට සැම විටම විවේක නැතත්, අඩුම තරමින් (කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය හරහා) සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල ජනයා මතු කරන අදහස් උදහස්වලට සවන් දිය හැකියි. වියදම් අධික ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ නිතර කරනු වෙනුවට බොහෝ ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී රටවල නායකයන් දැන් කරන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කතාබහ නිරීක්ෂණය කිරීමයි.

ජනපති සිරිසේන පදවි ප‍්‍රාප්තියෙන් පසු නිල ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ඇරඹුවා. ගෙවී ගිය වසර තුළ ඒවාට ඒකරාශී වූ ජන සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩි වී තිබෙනවා. 2015 මැද පමණ සිට ෆේස්බුක් වේදිකාව මත සිටින ලාංකික දේශපාලන චරිත අතරින් වැඩිම පිරිසක් එක් රැස්ව සිටින්නේ සිරිසේනගේ නිල ගිණුමටයි. (එතෙක් මුල් තැන සිටි මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ දැන් දෙවැනි තැනට පත්වෙලා.)

සිරිසේන නිල ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුමෙන් කරන්නේ ඔහුගේ කතා, සුබපැතුම් හා උත්සව ඡායාරූප බෙදා හැරීම පමණයි. එහි එන පාඨකයන් සමග අන්තර් ක‍්‍රියා සිදුවන්නේ ඉතා අඩුවෙන්. එහෙත් මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ නිල ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම ඔහු තනතුරේ සිටින විටත්, ඉන් පසුවත් වඩා සංවාදශීලී ලෙසින් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සාර්ථකත්වය යනු හුදෙක් ගොඩ වැඩි කර ගැනීම නොවෙයි. එහි එන ජනයා සමග සාකච්ඡාමය ගනුදෙනු වැඩියෙන් කිරීමයි (engagement). සියයකට අධික ජනපති මාධ්‍ය ඒකක කාර්ය මණ්ඩලයේ දෙතුන් දෙනකු මෙයට කැප කිරීම වටිනවාග

ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා කලින් දැනුම් දෙන ලද නිශ්චිත කාලයක (පැය 2-3) මහජන ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පිළිතුරු දීමේ සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් මතුව තිබෙනවා (FB/Twitter Q&A). මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ මෙන්ම චම්පික රණවක වැනි ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ දේශපාලකයන්ද මෙය විටින් විට කරනවා. එහිදි ලැබෙන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන කිසිදු පාලනයක්/වාරණයක් කළ නොහැකි නමුත් තමන් කැමති ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පමණක් තෝරා ගෙන කෙටියෙන් පිළිතුරු දිය හැකියි.

කණගාටුවට කරුණ වන්නේ ජනපති සිරිසේන හෝ අගමැති විකරමසිංහ වසරක් ගත වීත් කිසි විටෙක මෙබන්දක් නොකිරීමයි. සයිබර් අවකාශය හරහා රට වැසියන්ට මුහුණ දීමට ඇයි මෙතරම් පැකිලෙන්නේ?

Tell the President web banner

Tell the President web banner

‘ජනපතිට කියන්න’ සේවාවෙන් මේ අඩුපාඩු සපිරෙන්නේ නැහැ. එය ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් මෙන් විවෘත හා පාරදෘශ්‍ය වේදිකාවක් නොවෙයි.

සේවාව ඇරැඹුණු දවසේම රාජ්‍ය තොරතුරු සේවය දුරකථන අංක 1919 හරහා මා ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් යොමු කළා. එනම් මාධ්‍යවේදී ලසන්ත වික‍්‍රමතුංග ඝාතනයට ලක් වී එදිනට හරියටම වසර 7ක් පිරුණත්, යහපාලන පොරොන්දුවක් වූ එම අපරාධ විමර්ශනය කඩිනම් කිරීමට දැන් සිදු වන්නේ කුමක්ද යන්නයි.

මෙය පොදු උන්නතියට අදාළ ප‍්‍රශ්නයක්. මෙබඳු ප‍්‍රශ්න පොදු අවකාශයේ විවෘතව රාජ්‍ය නායකයන්ගෙන් ඇසිය හැකි නම් එහි වටිනාකම වැඩියි. එසේම මට ලැබෙන උත්තරය ද පොදු අවකාශයේ කාටත් කියවා ගත හැකි විවෘත එකක් විය හැකි නම් වඩාත් හොඳයි.

ජනපතිට කියන්න සේවය විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණයට (Open Government) තුඩු දෙන්නක් නොවන්නේ ඉහත කී සීමා නිසායි. මුල් පැය 24 තුළ ප‍්‍රතිචාර 3,000කට වඩා ලැබුණා යයි මාධ්‍ය වාර්තා කළත් ඒවා මොනවාද? කෙතරම් ඉක්මනින් ජනපති පිළිතුරු ලබා දෙනවාද යන්න දැනගත හැකි ක‍්‍රමයක් නැහැ.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #246: තොරතුරු අයිතිය විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණයට මුල් පියවරයි

පෞද්ගලික ප‍්‍රශ්න, ආයාචනා හා පැමිණිලි යොමු කිරීමේදී සංවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයකුත්, පොදු ප‍්‍රශ්න සඳහා විවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයකුත් අවශ්‍යයි. මේ විවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයට කිසිදු අලූත් පරිශ‍්‍රමයක් දැරිය යුතු නැහැ. ජනාධිපතිවරයාගේ පවතින ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් නිල ගිණුම් හරහාම කළ හැකියි.

එවන් විවෘත සයිබර් සංවාදයක තවත් වැදගත්කමක් නම් මතු පරිශීලනය සඳහා වෙබ්ගතව සංරක්ෂණය වීමයි. කලින් කලට වචනය වෙනස් කරන දේශපාලකයන් මෙයට නොරිසි විය හැකි වුවත් ප‍්‍රතිපත්තිගරුක හා අවංක ජන නායකයකුට තමන් අද කියන දෙය ලබන සතියේ, ඉදිරි මාසයක හෝ වසරක කාටත් ලෙහෙසියෙන් බලා ගත හැකි පරිදි සංරක්ෂණය වීම ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් නොවෙයි.

ජනපතිට කියන්න සේවාව කිනම් රාමුවක් තුළ පවත්වා ගන්නවාද යන්න පැහැදිලි නැහැ. එහෙත් මේ හරහා යළිත් වරක් රටේ හැම මට්ටමේම ප‍්‍රශ්න ජනපතිවරයාට කේන්ද්‍ර වීමේ අවදානමක් ද තිබෙනවා.

හිටපු ජනපතිවරයා රටේ දෙපාර්තමේන්තු, අමාත්‍යාංශ හා සෙසු රාජ්‍ය ආයතන තන්ත‍්‍රය කොන්කර දැමීමේ හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයක්ම විසඳන එකම ජගතා හා තීරකයා තමා පමණක් යන හැඟීම සමාජගත කරමින්. එය රාජ්‍ය පරිපාලනයට ඉතා අහිතකරයි.

විශේෂයෙන්ම 19 වන සංශෝධනයෙන් පසුව බලාත්මක කරන ලද ස්වාධීන කොමිසන් සභා ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වන පසුබිමෙක යළිත් අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස ජනපති-කේන්ද්‍රීය මහජන පැමිණිලි හා දුක් ගැනවිලි සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් ගොඩනැගීමට ඉඩ නොතැබිය යුතුයි.

එසේම රටවැසියන්ටත් මෙහි වගකීමක් තිබෙනවා. පත්වීම්, උසස්වීම්, වැටුප් වර්ධක, මාරුවීම්, විභාග ප‍්‍රතිඵල, පරිපාලන අක‍්‍රමිකතා ආදී බොහෝ කරුණු අරභයා නොවිසඳුණු ගැටලූ ඇති බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් මේ බොහොමයකට අදාළ පැමිණිලි හා පරීක්ෂණ ක‍්‍රමවේදයන් ඉමහත් මහජන මුදලකින් පවත්වා ගෙන යන බවත් අප දන්නවා. පවතින ක‍්‍රමවේදයන්ට යොමු නොවී හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයම ජනපතිට කියන්න යාම ඔහුගේත්, රටේත් කාලය හා සම්පත් අපතේ යැවීමක්.

මේ අතර ජනපති නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන දක්වන ආකල්ප ගැනද යමක් කිව යුතුයි.

දෙසැම්බර් 27 වනදා අම්පාරේ රැස්වීමක් අමතමින් ජනපති සිරිසේන කළ සුචරිතවාදී කතාව සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල මහත් ආන්දෝලනයක් ඇති කළා. එන්රිකේ ගායකයාගේ දෙසැම්බර් 20 කොළඹ ප‍්‍රසංගයේ යම් පේ‍්‍රක්ෂක හැසිරීම් ගැන ජනපතිවරයා නොසතුට පළ කළ අතර එසේ කිරිමට ඔහුට පූර්ණ භාෂණ නිදහස තිබෙනවා. තමා කැමති මතයක් දැරීමට අන් සියලූ රටවැසියන්ට ඇති නිදහස එපමණින්ම ඔහුට ද තිබෙනවා.

එමෙන්ම රටේ නායකයා සමග ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ එකඟ නොවීමට හා ඔහු තරයේ විවේචනය කිරීමට ඒ හා සමාන අයිතියක් රටවැසියන් වන අප සතුයි. ජනපතිගේ මඩුවලිග කතාවට මාත් ඇතුළු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන බොහෝ දෙනෙකු විරෝධය දැක්වූවා.

‘අපේකම’ යන්න පටු ලෙසින් විග‍්‍රහ කිරීම ගැන මෙන්ම පුරාණ ලංකාවේ යොදා ගැනුණු, ශිෂ්ට සමාජයකට තව දුරටත් නොගැළපෙන ම්ලේච්ඡ දඬුවමක් (අඩු තරමින් කට වචනයෙන් හෝ) නිර්දේශ කිරීම ද අපේ විවේචනවලට හේතු වුණා.

President Sirisena of Sri Lanka lashes out at online critics claiming a plot to destroy him - Lankadeepa, 30 December 2015

President Sirisena of Sri Lanka lashes out at online critics claiming a plot to destroy him – Lankadeepa, 30 December 2015

මගේ වැටහීමට අනුව සංවාදය එතැනින් හමාර විය හැකිව තිබුණා. එහෙත් ලංකාදීප වාර්තාවකට අනුව දෙසැම්බර් 29 වනදා බත්තරමුල්ලේ කතාවක් කළ ජනාධිපතිවරයා නිවී යමින් තිබූ ප‍්‍රතිවිරෝධයට ඉන්දන එකතු කළා. වෙබ් අඩවි හෝ ෆේස්බුක් ඔස්සේ තමා ‘පොඩි පට්ටම් කිරීමට, අඹරා දැමීමට සහ නැති කිරීමට’ සමහරුන් කටයුතු කරන බවට චෝදනා කළා.

තමා වට කොට (වාචිකව) පහරදීමේ සංවිධානාත්මක ප‍්‍රයත්නයක් ඇතැයි යන උපකල්පනය මත රටේ නායකයා සැකමුසු මානසිකත්වයක් ගොඩ නගා ගනී නම් එය ඔහුටත්, රටටත් අහිතකරයි. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ දේශපාලන ප‍්‍රතිවාදීන් ද සිටිය හැකි නමුත් මා දන්නා තරමට එබඳු සංවිධානාත්මක ප‍්‍රයත්නයක් නැහැ.

එහෙත් එක් පැහැදිලි සත්යයක් තිබෙනවාග සමාජ මාධ් විශේෂයෙනුත්, වෙබ් අවකාශය පොදුවේත් ගරුසරු නොකරන තැනක්. අධිපතිවාදයන්ට හා උද්දච්චකමට නොකැමැති පිරිස එහි වැඩියි.

උදාහරණයකට වෙනත් මාධ්‍යවල තවමත් යෙදෙන තුමා හා තුමිය ආදිය එහි අදාළ නැහැ. හොඳ දෙයට සයිබර් අත්පොළසන් නාදයත් (එනම් දිගින් දිගටම ෂෙයාර් වීම් සහ ලයික් වීම) මෙන්ම අධිපතිවාදී හෝ පණ්ඩිත කථාවලට සයිබර් හූවත් මතුව එනවා. මඩුවලිග කථාවට ලැබුණේ දෙවැන්නයිග

හිමිකරුවන් නැති, කතුවරුන් නැති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය (වෙනත් මාධ්‍ය මෙන්) රාජ්‍ය බලය යොදා මෙල්ල කරන්නට බැහැ. හැකි එකම දෙය සීරුවෙන්, සුහදව හා සහයෝගීතාවෙන් එහි ගැවසෙන පිරිස සමග ගනුදෙනු කිරීමයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල ද උදව්වෙන් තනතුරට ආ සිරිසේන ජනාධිපතිවරයාට ඒ හරහා රටවැසියන් සමග හරවත් හා මිත‍්‍රශීලී සංවාදයකට යාමට තවමත් ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. දෙවැනි වසරේවත් ඔහු එය කරනු ඇතැයි අපි පතමු!

මාධ්‍යය කුමක් වුවත් රටවැසි අපට සවන් දෙනල අප සමග සුහදව කථා කරන හා අපට බණ නොකියන නූතන නායකයකු ඕනෑ!

See also:

4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

18 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #203: මෛත‍්‍රීගේ මැන්ඩෙලා මොහොත!

15 January 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #160: දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයෙ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාධකය

Exploring Open Data and Open Government in Sri Lanka

An Open Dialogue about Open Data

An Open Dialogue about Open Data

Today, I gave the opening speech at an introductory seminar on ‘open data’ held at the Sri Lanka Press Institute, Colombo, on 15 Oct 2015.

Organised by InterNews and Transparency International Sri Lanka, the seminar explored the concepts of ‘open data’ and ‘big data’ and discussed that role civil society, media and technologists can play in advocating to government to open up its data, enabling a culture of transparency and open government.

An Open Dialogue on Open Data - 15 Oct 2015 Coloombo - L to R - Sriganesh Lokanathan, Nalaka Gunawardene, Sanjana Hattotuwa [Photo by Sam de Silva]

An Open Dialogue on Open Data – 15 Oct 2015 Coloombo – L to R – Sriganesh Lokanathan, Nalaka Gunawardene, Sanjana Hattotuwa [Photo by Sam de Silva]

My premise was that while the proliferation of digital tools and growth of web-based data storage (the cloud) opens up new possibilities for information generation and sharing, South Asian societies need to tackle institutional and cultural factors before democratised and digital data can really transform governance and development. Our countries must adopt more inclusive policies and practices for public sharing of scientific and other public data.

This resonates with a call by the United Nations for a ‘data revolution for development’. I cited the UN Secretary-General’s Independent Expert Advisory Group on a Data Revolution for Sustainable Development (IEAG) highlighted this in a report titled  A World That Counts: Mobilising The Data Revolution for Sustainable Development (Nov 2014).

A World that Counts...

A World that Counts…

I also referred to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were adopted by member states of the UN at a heads of state level summit in New York on 25-27 September 2015. Underpinning all 17 SDGs is an explicit recognition of the value of data for development — to better inform decisions, and to better monitor progress.

Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena addressed the Summit, and officially committed Sri Lanka to the SDGs. I argue that implicit in that commitment is a recognition of data for development and open data policies. We now need to ask our government to introduce a government-wide policy on data collection, storage and sharing. In short, it must open up!

This was my open call to the President to open up:

Open Your Govt's Data, Mr President! Hope you don't give us HAL's famous answer...

Open Your Govt’s Data, Mr President! Hope you don’t give us HAL’s famous answer…

Sri Lanka has taken tentative steps towards open data. In 2013, the Open Data initiative of Government started making some official datasets freely available online. It focuses on machine-readable (well-structured and open) datasets.

I quoted from my own recent op-ed published in Daily Mirror broadsheet newspaper:

Daily Mirror, 14 Sep 2015: Beyond RTI: Moving to Open Data and Open Govt. by Nalaka Gunawardene

After many years of advocacy by civil society, Sri Lanka will soon adopt a law that guarantees citizens’ Right to Information (RTI). It has recently been added to the Constitution as a fundamental right.

Passing the RTI law is only a beginning — institutionalising it requires much effort, considerable funds, and continued vigilance on civil society’s part.

RTI is Coming: Are We Ready? My question to Lankan civil society and media

RTI is Coming: Are We Ready? My question to Lankan civil society and media

As champions of RTI, media and civil society must now switch roles, I said. While benefiting from RTI themselves, they can nurture the newly promised openness in every sphere, showing citizens how best to make use of it. Reorienting our public institutions to a new culture of openness and information sharing will be an essential step.

Here is my full PPT:

 

From MDGs to SDGs: Well done, Sri Lanka, but mind the gaps!

This op-ed appeared in Daily Mirror broadsheet newspaper in Sri Lanka on 1 October 2015.

From MDGs to SDGs:

Well done, Sri Lanka — but mind the gaps!

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Over the weekend of September 25 – 27, the United Nations headquarters in New York hosted the Sustainable Development Summit 2015. It was a high-level segment of the 70th UN General Assembly that was attended by many world leaders including Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena.

Sustainable Development Summit 2015 Logo

Sustainable Development Summit 2015 Logo

The UN, which turns 70 this year, is once again rallying its member governments to a lofty vision and ambitious goal: to embark on new paths to improve the lives of people everywhere.

For this, the Summit adopted a new and improved global task-list called Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Prepared after two years of worldwide consultations, the SDGs offer a blueprint for development until 2030.

There are 17 SDGs tackling long-standing problems like ending poverty and reducing inequality to relatively newer challenges like creating more liveable cities and tackling climate change. These are broken down into 169 specific targets. Their implementation will formally begin on 1 January 2016.

SDGs in a nutshell - courtesy UN

SDGs in a nutshell – courtesy UN

The SDGs are to take over from the Millennium Development Goals, or MDGs, that have guided the development sector for 15 years. Sri Lanka was among the 189 countries that adopted the MDGs at the Millennium Summit the UN hosted in New York in September 2000. On that occasion, the country was represented by Lakshman Kadirgamar as Minister of Foreign Affairs.

The eight MDGs covered a broad spectrum of goals, from eradicating absolute poverty and hunger to combating HIV, and from ensuring all children attend primary school to saving mothers from dying during pregnancy and childbirth.

Much has happened in the nearly 5,500 days separating the adoption of the original MDGs and now, the successor SDGs. This month, as the world commits to ‘leaving no one behind’ (as UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said), it is useful to look back, briefly.

Good ‘Report Card’

How has Sri Lanka pursued the MDGs while the country coped with a long drawn civil war, political change, and the fall-out of a global economic recession?

In fact, it has done reasonably well. In its human development efforts, Sri Lanka has quietly achieved a great deal. However, there are gaps that need attention, and some goals not yet met.

That is also the overall message in a recent report that took stock of Sri Lanka’s pursuit of Millennium Development Goals, or MDGs.

Sri Lanka MDG Country Report 2014

Sri Lanka MDG Country Report 2014

We might sum it up with a phrase that teachers are fond of using, even on good students: “You’re doing well – but can do better! Try harder!”

For the past 15 years, the MDGs have provided a framework for Sri Lanka’s national development programmes. Progress has been assessed every few years: the most recent ‘report card’ came out in March 2015.

The MDG Country Report 2014, prepared by the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS), is a joint publication by the Government of Sri Lanka and the United Nations in Sri Lanka. Data from the 2012 census and Household Income and Expenditure Survey 2012/13 have generated plenty of data to assess MDG situation across the country, including the war affected areas.

“Sri Lanka has already achieved the targets of 13 important MDG indicators out of 44 indicators relevant to Sri Lanka. Most of the other indicators are either ‘On Track’ or progressing well,” says IPS Executive Director Dr Saman Kelegama in his foreword to the report.

Highlights

 The report offers insights into how Sri Lanka’s ‘soft infrastructure’ — all the systems and institutions required to maintain the economic, health, cultural and social standards of a country – are faring.

Consider these highlights:

  • Sri Lanka’s overall income poverty rates, when measured using accepted statistical benchmarks, have come down from 2% in 2006/7 to 6.7% in 2012.
  • Unemployment rate has declined from 8% in 1993 to 3.9% in 2012. However, unemployment rate among women is twice as high as among men.
  • While food production keeps up with population growth, malnutrition is a concern. A fifth of all children under five are underweight. And half of all people still consume less than the minimum requirement of daily dietary energy.
  • Nearly all (99%) school going children enter primary school. At that stage, the numbers of boys and girls are equal. In secondary school and beyond (university), in fact, there now are more girls than boys.
  • More babies now survive their first year of life than ever before: infant mortality rate has come down to 9.4 among 1,000 live births (from 17.7 in 1991). Deaths among children under five have also been nearly halved (down from 2 in 1991 to 11.3 in 2009).
  • Fewer women die needlessly of complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth. The maternal mortality rate, which stood at 92 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990, plummeted to 33 by 2010. Doctors or skilled health workers are now present during almost all births.
  • Sri Lanka’s HIV infection levels have remained now, even though the number of cases is slowly increasing. Meanwhile, in a major public health triumph, the country has all but eradicated malaria: there have been no indigenous malaria cases since November 2012, and no malaria-related deaths since 2007.
  • More Lankans now have access to safe drinking water (up from 68% in 1990 to almost 90% in 2012-2013.)

These and other social development outcomes are the result of progressive policies that have been sustained for decades.

“Sri Lanka’s long history of investment in health, education and poverty alleviation programmes has translated into robust performance against the MDGs, and Sri Lanka has many lessons to share,” said Sri Lanka’s UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative, Subinay Nandy, at the report’s launch in March 2015.

Proportion of Lankans living below the poverty line - total head count and breakdown by district

Proportion of Lankans living below the poverty line – total head count and breakdown by district

Mind the Gaps!

Despite these results, many gaps and challenges remain that need closer attention and action in the coming years.

One key concern is how some impressive national level statistics can eclipse disparities at provincial and district levels. The MDG data analysis clearly shows that all parts of Sri Lanka have not progressed equally well.

For example, while most districts have already cut income poverty rates in half, there are some exceptions. These include eight districts in the Northern and Eastern provinces, for which reliable data are not available to compare with earlier years, and the Monaragala District in Uva Province – where poverty has, in fact, increased in the past few years.

Likewise, many human development indicators are lower in the plantation estate sector, where 4.4% of the population lives. An example: while at least 90% of people in urban and rural areas can access safe drinking water, the rate in the estate sector is 46.3%.

Another major concern: the gap between rich and poor remains despite economic growth. “Income inequality has not changed, although many poor people managed to move out of poverty and improve their living conditions,” the MDG Progress report says.

In Gender Equality, Sri Lanka’s performance is mixed. There is no male-female disparity in education, and in fact, there are more literate women in the 15 to 24 age than men. But “these achievements have not helped in increasing the share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector,” notes the report.

Disappointingly, women’s political participation is also very low. The last Parliament had 13 women members out of 225. That was 5.8% compared to the South Asian rate of 17.8% and global rate of 21.1%. The report has urged for “measures to encourage a substantial increase in the number of women in political offices”.

Of course, MDGs and human development are not just a numbers game. While measurable progress is important, quality matters too.

The MDG report highlights the urgent need to improve the quality and relevance of our public education. Among the policy measures needed are increasing opportunities for tertiary education, bridging the gap between education and employment, and reducing the skills mismatch in the labour market.

On the health front, too, there is unfinished – and never ending — business. Surveillance for infectious diseases cannot be relaxed. Even as malaria fades away, dengue has been spreading. Old diseases like tuberculosis (8,000 cases per year) stubbornly persist. A rise in non-communicable diseases – like heart attacks, stroke, cancers and asthma – poses a whole new set of public health challenges.

Sri Lanka offers the safest motherhood in South Asia

Sri Lanka offers the safest motherhood in South Asia

Open Development

So the ‘well-performing’ nation of Sri Lanka still has plenty to do. It is just as important to sustain progress already achieved.

The new and broader SDGs will provide guidance in this process, but each country must set its own priorities and have its own monitoring systems. The spread of information and communications technologies (ICTs) has created new sources of real-time data that can help keep track of progress, or lack of it, more easily and faster.

Whereas MDGs covered mostly “safe” themes like poverty, primary education and child deaths, the SDGs take on topics such as governance, institutions, human rights, inequality, ageing and peace. This reflects how much international debates have changed since the late 1990s when the MDGs were developed mostly by diplomats and technocrats.

This time around, not only governments and academics but advocacy groups and activists have also been involved in hundreds of physical and virtual consultations to agree on SDGs. In total, more than seven million people have contributed their views.

As the government of Sri Lanka pursues the SDGs that it has just committed to in New York, we the people expect a similar consultative process.

Goodbye, closed development. Welcome, Open Development!

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene wrote an earlier version of this for UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Sri Lanka’s new blog Kiyanna.lk. The views are his own, based on 25 years of development communication experience.

Equal numbers of girls and boys go to school in Sri Lanka today, But women struggle harder to find employment.

Equal numbers of girls and boys go to school in Sri Lanka today, But women struggle harder to find employment.

All infographics courtesy: Millennium Development Goals: Sri Lanka’s Progress and Key Achivements, http://countryoffice.unfpa.org/srilanka/?reports=10872

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #229: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යුගයේ අපේ දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනය

In this week’s Ravaya column, (in Sinhala, appearing in issue of 26 July 2015), I review how Lankan politicians and political parties are using social media in the run-up to the general election to be held on 17 August 2015.

In particular, I look at how President Maithripala Sirisena and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe are using Facebook and Twitter (mostly to ‘broadcast’ their news and images, and hardly ever to engage citizens). I also remark on two other politicians who have shown initiative in social media use, i.e. former President Mahinda Rajapaksa and JHU leader Champika Ranawaka (both of who have held live Q&As on social media with varying degrees of engagement).

I raise questions like these: Can political parties afford to not engage 25% of Lankan population now regularly using the web? When would election campaigners – rooted in the legacy media’s practice of controlling and fine-tuning messages – come to terms with the unpredictable and sometimes unruly nature of social media?

While politicians, their campaigners and parties struggle to find their niches on social media, politically conscious citizens need to up their game too. Cyber literacy has been slower to spread than mere internet connectivity in Sri Lanka, and we need enlightened and innovative use of social media in the public interest. Every citizen, activist and advocacy group can play a part.

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

ජනගහනයෙන් හතරෙන් එකක් පමණ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන මට්ටමට එළැඹ සිටින අපේ රටේ මෙම සයිබර් සාධකය මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රචාරණයට හා ඡන්දදායක මතයට කෙසේ බලපානවාද යන්න විමසීම වැදගත්.

2010 මහ මැතිවරණයේ භාවිත වූවාට වඩා බෙහෙවින් මෙවර මැතිවරණයේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය සිදුවන බව නම් කල් තබාම කිව හැකියි.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂ, ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්, සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධාන හා සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියන් යන මේ පිරිස් සතරම වෙබ් අඩවි හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වෙත යොමු වීමත් සමග දේශපාලන තොරතුරු හා මතවාද ගලා යෑම පෙර පැවතියාට වඩා වෙනස්වන්නේ කෙලෙසද?

විශේෂයෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත හා පක්ෂවලින් ප‍්‍රශ්න කරන්නට හා ඔවුන් අභියෝගයට ලක් කරන්නට හැකි වීම හරහා දේශපාලන සංවාද වඩා හරවත් විය හැකිද? මෙය කෙතරම් පුළුල්ව රටේ සමාජගත වනවාද?

Twitter and Facebook - leading social media platforms

Twitter and Facebook – leading social media platforms

ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ ජනප‍්‍රියතම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලය ෆේස්බුක් (Facebook). එහි මෙරට ගිණුම් මිලියන් 2.5කට වඩා තිබෙනවා. ව්‍යාජ ගිණුම් හෝ ද්විත්ව ගිණුම් පසෙක තැබුවහොත් අඩු තරමින් මිලියන් 2ක් ලාංකිකයන් ෆේස්බුක් සැරිසරනවා යැයි කිව හැකියි. මෙරට ජනප‍්‍රිය අනෙක් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවන්නේ ට්විටර් (Twitter), වීඩියෝ බෙදා ගන්නා යූටියුබ් (YouTube) හා ඡායාරූප හුවමාරු කැරෙන ඉන්ස්ටග‍්‍රෑම් (Instagram).

මේ හැම සයිබර් වේදිකාවකම මේ දිනවල දේශපාලනයට අදාළ තොරතුරු, මතවාද හා රූප බෙහෙවින් සංසරණය වනවා.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට හා ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්ට මේ යථාර්ථය නොසලකා සිටීමට බැහැ. එහෙත් බොහෝ පක්ෂවල මැතිවරණ කැම්පේන් හසුරුවන්නේ සාම්ප‍්‍රදායික මාධ්‍ය ගැන දන්නා, එහෙත් නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන හරි අවබෝධයක් නැති හිටපු මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හෝ දැන්වීම් ඒජන්සි විසින්.

පත්තරවල මුදල් ගෙවා ඉඩ මිලට ගැනීමට හා රේඩියෝ-ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවල ගුවන් කාලය මිලට ගැනීමට මේ උදවිය හොඳහැටි දන්නවා. මුදලට වඩා කාලය, ශ‍්‍රමය හා නිර්මාණශීලී බව අවශ්‍ය වන සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට නිසි ලෙස ප‍්‍රවේශ වන හැටි මේ අයට වැටහීමක් නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලටත් මුදල් ගෙවා ඕනැම කෙනකුට තම ප‍්‍රචාරය උත්සන්න කර ගත හැකියි. ෆේස්බුක් ගෝලීය වේදිකාවක් වුවත්, තම භාණ්ඩය හෝ සේවාව හෝ පණිවුඩය නිශ්චිත රටක, නිශ්චිත වයස් කාණ්ඩයකට ඉලක්ක කොට පෙන්වීම කර ගත හැකියි.

එසේම ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් සඳහා තොග වශයෙන් ලෝලීන් (fans) හා මනාප (likes) විකුණන විදේශීය සමාගම් තිබෙනවා. අපේ සමහර දේශපාලන චරිත අරඹා ඇති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම්වලට ඔවුන් හීන්සීරුවේ මුදල් ගෙවා මෙසේ තොග පිටින් ලෝලීන් හා මනාප ලබා ගෙන ඇති බව හෙළිව තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලකයන්ට ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ සිටින Fans ගණනටත් වඩා තුර්කියේ සිටින සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩිවීමට හේතුව එයයි.

20 March 2015: Social Media Analysis: Sri Lankan Politicians and Social Media

මුදල් ගෙවා ලබා ගන්නා සමාජ මාධ් රමුඛත්වය විශ්වසනීය හෝ සාර්ථක වන්නේ නැහැ. මෙය කුලියට ගත් බස් රථවලින් මුදල් ගෙවා සෙනග රැළිවලට ගෙනෙනවාට සමානයිග සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාව පුළුල් වන විට මෙබඳු උපක‍්‍රම ගැන වැඩි දෙනකු දැන ගන්නවා.

social-media

කෙටි කාලීනවත් දිගු කාලීනවත් වඩාත් සාර්ථක ප‍්‍රවේශය නම් නිරතුරු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසියන් සමග සාමීචියේ හා සංවාදයේ යෙදී සිටීමයි (මැතිවරණයක් එළැඹි විට පමණක් නොවෙයි).

දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා කැම්පේන්කරුවන් කියන දෙය ඡන්දදායක මහජනතාව වැඳ ගෙන ඔහේ අසා සිටි කාලය ඉවරයි. දැන් මතුව එන්නේ අප කාටත් සංවාද විසංවාද හා තර්ක කළ හැකි නව සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථයක්.

සමාජ ජාල මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන සියලූ ලාංකික දේශපාලකයන් හෝ දේශපාලන පක්ෂ හෝ නිතිපතා ෆලෝ කරන්නට මට හැකි වී නැහැ. එය ලේසි පාසු කාරියක්ද නොවෙයි.

එහෙත් ජනාධිපති මෛත‍්‍රීපාල සිරිසේනගේ නිල ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ද, අගමැති රනිල් වික‍්‍රමසිංහගේ ට්විටර් ගිණුමද හරහා කුමක් සන්නිවේදනය වේද යන්න ගැන මා විමසිලිමත්ව සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

President Sirisena’s verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

කාර්යබහුල මෙවන් නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් පවත්වාගෙන යන්නේ ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් විසින්. එය ලොව පුරා සම්ප‍්‍රදායක්. බොහෝ විට මේ ගිණුම් හරහා නායකයා කරන කියන දේ ගැන සංක්ෂිප්ත තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප/කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හැරෙනවා.

මේ අන්තර්ගතයම නිල වෙබ්අඩවි හා මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රකාශන හරහා ද නිකුත් කැරෙන නමුත් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය පවා අද කාලේ නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් හරහා කියැවෙන දේ ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටිනවා. අවශ්‍ය විටදී යම් දේ එතැනින් උපුටා දක්වනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගත වන දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් මුහුණ දෙන අභියෝග ගණනාවක් තිබෙනවා. මූලික එකක් නම් තමන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් විශ්වාසදායක නිල ගිනුම් (verified accounts) බව තහවුරු කර ගැනීමයි.

ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙබ් අඩවි ලිපිනයන් (URLs) මෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් නාමයන් ද මුලින්ම එය ලියාපදිංචි කරන්නාට හිමි කර ගත හැකියි. රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරිවාදය නැති සයිබර් අවකාශයේ අපූර්වත්වය එය වුවත් එය අවභාවිතයට යොදන අයද සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Twitter account - screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

President Sirisena’s verified Twitter account – screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

 

මෙරට ජනාධිපති හා අගමැති දෙදෙනාගේම නම් පදනම් කර ගෙන ඇරඹූ ව්යාජ ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ඕනෑකමින් අධ්යයනය කළ විට මේවා ව්යාජ බව පෙනී යතත්, බැලූ බැල්මට ජනයා මුලා කිරීමේ හැකියාව තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා රසිද්ධ පුද්ගලයන් (දේශපාලන නායකයන්, සිනමා තරු, රීඩකයන් ආදීන්) අනන්යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ් ගිණුම් සකසා ගැනීමත්, එය පැහැදිලිව පෙන්නුම් කිරීමත් වැදගත්.

පසුගිය ජනාධිපතිවරණයේදී කැම්පේන් වැඩට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යම් පමණකට ඔවුන් යොදා ගත්තද ජනාධිපති සිරිසේන හා අගමැති වික‍්‍රමසිංහ දෙපළටම අනන්‍යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් තිබුණේ නැහැ. මේවායේ අවශ්‍යතාව අප සමහරක් දෙනා ප‍්‍රසිද්ධ අවකාශයේ පෙන්වා නිතර දුන්නා.

මේ අනුව 2015 මැයි මාසයේ පටන් ජනාධිපති සිරිසේනට තහවුරු කරන ලද නිල ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ප‍්‍රමාද වී හෝ මෙය ලබා ගැනීම හිතකර ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. එහෙත් වික‍්‍රමසිංහ නමින් ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ගණනාවක් පවතින අතර එයින් කුමක් ඔහුගේ නිල ගිණුම් ද යන්න තහවුරු කර නැහැ. අපට කළ හැක්කේ අනුමාන පමණයි.

මේ දෙදෙනාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය ද ප‍්‍රශස්ත මට්ටමක නැහැ. ගිය වසර අගදී කැම්පේන් කරන විටත්, ජනාධිපති ලෙස තේරී පත් වූ පසුවත් මෛත‍්‍රිපාල සිරිසේන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන්නේ තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප බෙදාහරින්නට මිස පුරවැසියන් සමග සංවාදයට නොවෙයි.

ජනපතිවරණයට පෙර හා පසු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පිළිතුරු දෙන සජීව සැසි වාරයක් (Live Q&A) කරන මෙන් අප ඉල්ලා සිටියා. මේ වනතුරු එබන්දක් සිදුකර නැහැ. තම ජයග්‍රහනයට උපකාර වූවා යයි ඔහුම ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පැසසූ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප්‍රශ්නවලට මුහුණ දීමට ජනපති සිරිසේන පැකිලෙන්නේ ඇයි?

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account - IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account – IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

වික‍්‍රමසිංහ අගමැතිවරයාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය වඩාත් පසුගාමීයි. ඔහුගේ ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුමෙන් මේ දිනවල ප‍්‍රචාරක රැලිවල ඡායාරූප හා කෙටි කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හරිනවා. එහෙත් රටේ ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන හෝ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති/විසඳුම් ගැන කිසිදු සංවාදයක් පෙනෙන්නට නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත ප‍්‍රචාරණයට එහා යන තවත් බොහෝ දේ කළ හැකියි. මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රකාශයන්ට අදහස් හා යෝජනා ඉල්ලා ලබා ගත හැකියි. රටේ දැවෙන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන (සීරුවෙන් හා ප‍්‍රවේශමෙන්) සංවාද කොට මහජන මතය ගැන දළ හැඟීමක් ලද හැකියි. ඡන්දදායකයන්ගේ රුචි අරුචිකම්, ප‍්‍රමුඛතා හා අපේක්ෂා ගැන ගවේෂණය කළ හැකියි.

ඉන්දියාව, ඉන්දුනීසියාව, තායිලන්තය හා පිලිපීනය වැනි ආසියානු රටවල දේශපාලකයන් හා පක්ෂ මෙසේ වඩාත් හරවත් හා පුළුල් ලෙසින් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගන්නවා.

මැතිවරණ ආසන්න වන විට මිලියන් ගණන් වැය කරමින් ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ පැවැත්වීම දැන් අපේ ප‍්‍රධාන දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලත් සිරිතක්. බොහෝ විට සොයා ගැනීම් ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියට පත් නොකරන මේ සමීක්ෂණවලින් කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ හා අවධාරණය කළ යුතු තැන් ආදිය ගැන යම් ඉඟි ලැබෙන බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් සමීක්ෂකයන් අසන හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයකටම ජනයා අවකංව පිළිතුරු නොදෙන නිසා මේ සමීක්ෂණවල ආවේණික සීමා තිබෙනවා.

එයට වඩා විවෘත ලෙස මත දැක්වීමක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ කැරෙනවා. මේවා විශ්ලේෂණය කරන මෘදුකාංග හරහා යම් සමුච්චිත ප‍්‍රවණතා සොයා ගත හැකියි. එබඳු විශ්ලේෂණ දැන් වෙනත් රටවල දේශපාලන පක්ෂ සන්නිවේදකයෝ කරනවා. ඒ හරහා කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ වඩාත් සමාජගත කර ගත හැකියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල විභවය තේරුම් ගෙන ඇතැයි පෙනෙන ජාතික මට්ටමේ දේශපාලන චරිත දෙකක් නම් මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ හා චම්පික රණවකයි. ඔවුන්ගේ දේශපාලන මතවාදයන් කුමක් වෙතත්, මෙරට සෙසු දේශපාලකයන්ට සාපේක්ෂව ඔවුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා යම් පුරවැසි පිරිසක් සමග සන්නිවේදනය කරනවා. නිතිපතා නොවූවත් විටින් විට හෝ පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පිළිතුරු ද දෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

ගිය වසරේ මේ දෙපළ පැවැත් වූ ට්විටර් ප‍්‍රශ්නෝත්තර සැසිවලදී දුෂ්කර යැයි සැලකිය හැකි අන්දමේ ප‍්‍රශ්න මා ඉදිරිපත් කළා. රාජපක්ෂ එවන් ප‍්‍රශ්න නොතකා හැර ලෙහෙසි යයි පෙනෙන ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පමණක් පිළිතුරු දුන්නා. එහෙත් රණවක ආන්දෝලනාත්මක මාතෘකා ගැන පවා තම මතයේ සිට පිළිතුරු සැපයූවා. එම පිළිතුරු ගැන මා සෑහීමකට පත් නොවූවත් ඔහු එසේ සංවාදයේ නියැලීම මා අගය කරනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල බොරු පුරාජේරු පම්පෝරි කරන්න අමාරුයි. එය භාවිත කරන සමහර පුරවැසියන් ගරුසරු නොවීමට හා සත්‍යවාදී නොවීමට ද ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලන කැම්පේන්කරුවන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සංවාදවලට ඉඩ නොදෙන්නේ මේ අවදානම නිසා විය හැකියි.

දේශපාලන රැස්වීම් වේදිකාවක කථිකයකුට ඉඳහිට හූ හඬක් ලැබිය හැකි වුවත් ඉන් ඔබ්බට යන අභියෝග මතු වන්නේ නැහැ. ටෙලිවිෂන් දේශපාලන සංවාදවලත් මෙහෙයවන්නා විසින් යම් සමනයක් පවත්වා ගන්නවා. මෙබඳු තිරිංග නැති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දුෂ්කර ප‍්‍රශ්න, අවලාද, බොරු චෝදනා හා අපහාස එල්ල විය හැකියි.

එහෙත් පොදු අවකාශයේ සිටින, මහජන නියෝජිතයන් වීමට වරම් පතන දේශපාලකයන් මෙබඳු මහජන රතිචාරවලට මුහුණ දීමේ හැකියාව හා පරිණත බව සමාජ මාධ් හරහා රටටම පෙනෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa's verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa’s verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පරිහරණය කරන පුරවැසි අපටත් වගකීම් තිබෙනවා. අප කැමති දේශපාලන පක්ෂයට හා චරිතවලට සයිබර් සහයෝගය දෙන අතරේ යම් සංයමයක් පවත්වා ගත යුතුයි. ප‍්‍රතිවිරුද්ධ මතධාරීන්ට අසැබි ලෙසින් පහර නොගසා තර්කයට තර්කය මතු කළ යුතුයි. එසේම නොකඩවා ගලා එන විවිධ විග‍්‍රහයන් හා රූප වැඩිදුර පතුරුවන්නට පෙර ඒවා වෛරීය දේශපාලනයට අදාළදැයි මඳක් සිතිය යුතුයි.

මෙරට ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන්නන්ගෙන් 80%කට වඩා එහි රවේශ වන්නේ ස්මාට් ෆෝන් හරහායි. ස්මාට්ෆෝන් තිබුනාට මදි. ස්මාට් පුරවැසියන් වීමටත් ඕනෑ! වැඩවසම් ගතානුගතිකත්වය හා වෛරීය ජාතිකත්වය පසු කර නව දේශපාල සදාචාරයක් බිහි කරන්නට අප දායක විය යුතුයි!

See also other related columns of mine:

16 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #160: දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයෙ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාධකය

23 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #161: සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ඇයි මේ තරම් බය?

21 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #199: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය, මැතිවරණ හා ඩිජිටල් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය

28 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #200: ඩිජිටල් තාක්‍ෂණයෙන් මැතිවරණ ක‍්‍රියාදාමය පිරිසුදු කළ ඉන්දුනීසියාව

4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

 

 

Posted in Broadcasting, Campaigns, digital media, good governance, ICT, India, Indonesia, Internet, Media, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, social media, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Television, YouTube. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Op-ed Essay: The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

This op-ed essay of mine was published in Daily FT newspaper, Sri Lanka, on 16 July 2015.

The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Just when we began to worry that our recently elected head of state had lost his tongue, he broke his silence.

On July 14 evening, President Maithripala Sirisena finally addressed the nation. He spoke calmly and clearly. He was resolute — but with none of the pomp and bravado that characterised his predecessor Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Speech of the President Maithripala Sirisena – 14 July 2015 (in Sinhala)

Sirisena’s speech outlined his key actions and accomplishments since being elected less than 200 days ago in one of the biggest election surprises in Lankan political history. He was mildly defensive of his low-key style of governance, which includes extended periods of silence.

I’ll leave it for political scientists and activists to analyse the substance of the President’s Bastille Day speech. My concern here is why he waited this long.

If a week is a long time in politics, 10 days is close to an eon in today’s information society driven by 24/7 broadcast news and social media. An issue can evolve fast, and a person can get judged and written off in half that time.

For sure, there is a time to keep silence, and a time to speak – and the President must have had some good reasons keep mum. But in this instance, he paid a heavy price for it: he was questioned, ridiculed and maligned by many of us who had heartily cheered him only six months ago. (Full disclosure: I joined this chorus, creating several easy-to-share ‘memes’ and introducing an unkind twitter hashtag: #අයියෝසිරිසේන.)

President Maithripala Sirisena

President Maithripala Sirisena

Sri Lanka’s democratic recovery can’t afford too much of this uncertainty and distraction created by strategic presidential silences. Zen-like long pauses don’t sit well with impatient citizen expectations.

And the President himself must reconsider this strategy (if it is indeed one) — his political opponents are hyperactive in both mainstream and social media, spinning an endless array of stories that discredit him.

Until a generation ago, we used to say that a lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes. In today’s networked society, when information travels at the speed of light, fabrications and half-truths spread faster than ever.

Public trust in leaders and institutions is also being redefined. Transparent governance needs political leaders to keep talking with their citizens, ideally in ways that enrich public conversations.

President Sirisena is not the only Lankan leader who needs to catch up with this new communications reality. When a controversy erupted over how the Central Bank of Sri Lanka handled Treasury Bond issue on February 27, the government took more than two weeks to respond properly.

On March 17, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe made a detailed statement in Parliament, which he opened with the words: “I felt my first statement with regard to the so-called controversy over Treasury bonds should be made to this House…”

In a strict legalistic or technocratic sense, Wickremesinghe was probably right (as he usually is). But in the meantime, too many speculations had circulated, some questioning the new administration’s commitment to transparency and accountability. Political detractors had had a field day.

Could it have been handled differently? Should the government spokespersons have turned more defensive or even combative?

More generically, is maintaining a stoic silence until full clarity emerges realistic when governments no longer have a monopoly over information dissemination? Is it ever wise, in today’s context, to stay quiet hoping things would eventually blow away? How does this lack of engagement affect public trust in governments and governance?

These are serious questions that modern day politicians and elected officials must address. In my view, we need a President and Prime Minister who are engaged with citizens — so that we are not left guessing wildly or speculating endlessly on what is going on.

No, this is not a call for political propaganda, which has also been sidelined by the increasingly vocal social media voices and debates.

What we need is what I outlined in an open letter to President Sirisena in January: “As head of state, we expect you to strive for accuracy, balance and credibility in all communications. The last government relied so heavily on spin doctors and costly lobbyists both at home and abroad. Instead, we want you to be honest with us and the outside world. Please don’t airbrush the truth.”

 

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene has been chronicling and analysing the rise of new media in Sri Lanka since the early 1990s. He is active on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com

Echelon July 2015 column: Kidney Disease Needs ‘Heart and Mind’ solutions

Text of my column written for Echelon monthly business magazine, Sri Lanka, July 2015 issue

Kidney Disease Needs ‘Heart and Mind’ solutions

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Mass kidney failure in Sri Lanka is a sign of wider systemic failure in land and water care

Mass kidney failure in Sri Lanka is a sign of wider systemic failure in land and water care

If bans and prohibitions were a measure of good governance, Sri Lanka would probably score well in global rankings. Successive governments have shown a penchant for banning – usually without much evidence or debate.

The latest such ban concerns glyphosate — the world’s most widely used herbicide – on the basis that it was causing chronic kidney disease in parts of the Dry Zone.

First, President Maithripala Sirisena announced such a ban in late May (which earned him lots of favourable coverage in environmental and health related websites worldwide).

Then, on 29 May 2015, state-owned Daily News reported under Cabinet decisions: “The scientists who carry out research on renal diseases prevailing in many parts of the country have pointed out that the use of pesticides, weedicides and chemical fertiliser could be contributing to this situation. Accordingly the government has already banned the import and usage of four identified chemical fertilizer and pesticides. In addition to this President has decided to totally ban the import and usage of glyphosate.”

Finally, the Finance Ministry on 11 June gazetted regulations banning the import of glyphosate under the Import and Export (Control) Act. By mid June, it was still unclear whether the ban is comprehensive, or an exception is to be made for tea plantations that rely heavily on this weedicide in lieu of costly labour for manual weeding.

Has this decision tackled the massive public health and humanitarian crisis caused by mass kidney failure? Sadly, no. The new government has ignored the views of a vast majority of Lankan scientists, and sided with an unproven hypothesis. This undermines evidence-based policy making and allows activist rhetoric to decide affairs of the state.

 A Silent Emergency

Map showing distribution of CKDu in Sri Lanka. Source - Journal of Agricultural Sciences, Sri Lanka http://jas.sljol.info/articles/abstract/10.4038/jas.v10i2.8055/

Map showing distribution of CKDu in Sri Lanka. Source – Journal of Agricultural Sciences, Sri Lanka http://jas.sljol.info/articles/abstract/10.4038/jas.v10i2.8055/

The chronic kidney disease was first reported from certain parts of the Dry Zone in the early 1990s. Hundreds were diagnosed with kidney failure – but none had the common risk factors of diabetes, high blood pressure or obesity. Hence the official name: Chronic Kidney Disease of uncertain aetiology, or CKDu.

The disease built up stealthily in the body, manifesting only in advanced stages. By then, regular dialysis or transplants were the only treatment options. Most affected were male farmers in working age, between 30 and 60 years.

In early 2013, the Ministry of Health estimated that some 450,000 persons were affected. The cumulative death toll has been reported between 20,000 and 22,000, but these numbers are not verified.

The kidney specialist who first detected the disease worries that some activists are exaggerating CKDu numbers. Dr Tilak Abeysekera, who heads the department of nephrology and transplantation at the Kandy Teaching Hospital, underlines the critical need for correct diagnosis. CKDu should not be confused with regular types of kidney disease, he says.

In December 2013, he told a national symposium organised by the National Academy of Sciences of Sri Lanka (NASSL) that only 16% of kidney patients in the Anuradhapura district – ‘ground zero’ of the mystery disease – could be classified as having CKDu.

It is clear, however, that CKDu has become a national humanitarian emergency. Providing medication and dialysis for those living with CKDu already costs more than 5% of the country’s annual health budget. With each dialysis session costing around LKR 12,000 (and 3 or 4 needed every week), very few among the affected can afford private healthcare.

Besides the mounting humanitarian cost, CKDu also has implications for agricultural productivity and rural economies as more farmers are stricken. With the cause as yet unknown (although confirmed as non-communicable), fears, myths and stigma are also spreading.

Looking for Causes

For two decades, researchers in Sri Lanka and their overseas collaborators have been investigating various environmental, geochemical and lifestyle-related factors. They have come up with a dozen hypotheses, none of it proven as yet.

Among the environmental factors suspected are: naturally high levels of Fluoride in groundwater; use of Aluminium utensils with such water; naturally occurring hard water (with high mineral content); cyanobacterial toxins in water; pesticide residues; and higher than safe levels of Cadmium or Arsenic. Lifestyle factors studied include the locally brewed liquor (kasippu), and certain Ayurvedic medicinal concoctions. Genetic predisposition to kidney failure has also been probed in some areas.

Researchers are baffled why CKDu is found only in certain areas of the Dry Zone when these environmental and lifestyle factors are common to a much larger segment of population. This makes it much harder to pinpoint a specific cause.

The most comprehensive study to date, the National CKDu Research Project (2009-2011), concluded that CKDu results from not one but several causes. The multidisciplinary study, led by Ministry of Health with support from the World Health Organisation (WHO), highlighted several risk factors. These include long-term exposure to low levels of cadmium and arsenic through the food chain, which are linked to the wide use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides. Selenium deficiency in the diet and genetic susceptibility might also play a part, the study found.

These findings were academically published in BMC Nephrology journal in August 2013 (See: www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2369/14/180). The paper ended with these words: “Steps are being taken to strengthen the water supply scheme in the endemic area as well as the regulations related to procurement and distribution of fertilizers and pesticides. Further studies are ongoing to investigate the contributory role of infections in the pathogenesis of CKDu.”

 Hazards of Pseudoscience

One thing is clear. Remedial or precautionary measures cannot be delayed until a full understanding of the disease emerges. Indeed, WHO has recommended taking care of the affected while science takes its own course.

Dr Shanthi Mendis, WHO’s director for managing non-communicable diseases, says: “CKDu is a major public health issue placing a heavy burden on government health expenditure and is a cause of catastrophic expenditure for families, leading to poverty and stigma in the community.”

CKDu needs a well-coordinated response from public health, agriculture and water supply sectors that typically fall under separate government ministries and agencies. We need to see mass kidney failure as more than just a public health emergency or environmental crisis. It is a sign of cascading policy failures in land care, water management and farming over decades.

In such complex situations, looking for a single ‘villain’ is both simplistic and misleading. For sure, the double-edged legacy of the Green Revolution — which promoted high external inputs in agriculture — must be critiqued, and past policy blunders need correction. Yet knee-jerk reactions or patchy regulation can do more harm than good.

“In Sri Lanka we have a powerful lobby of pseudoscientists who seek cheap popularity by claiming to work against the multinational corporations for their own vested political interests,” says Dr Oliver A Ileperuma, a senior professor of chemistry at Peradeniya University. In his view, the recent glyphosate ban is a pure political decision without any scientific basis.

His concerns are shared by several hundred eminent Lankan scientists who are fellows of NASSL, an independent scientific body (not a state agency). The Academy said in a statement in mid June that it was “not aware of any scientific evidence from studies in Sri Lanka or abroad showing that CKDu is caused by glyphosate.”

NASSL President Prof Vijaya Kumar said: “The very limited information available on glyphosate in Sri Lanka does not show that levels of glyphosate in drinking water in CKDu affected areas (North Central Province) are above the international standards set for safety. CKDu is rarely reported among farmers in neighbouring areas such as Ampara, Puttlam and Jaffna or even the wet zone, where glyphosate is used to similar extent. It has also not been reported in tea growing areas where glyphosate is far more intensively used.”

Agrochemical regulation

In recent years, the search for CKDu causes has become too mixed up with the separate case for tighter regulation of agrochemicals, a policy need on its own merit. International experience shows that a sectoral approach works better than a chemical by chemical one.

The bottomline: improving Sri Lanka’s agrochemical regulation needs an evidence-based, rigorous process that does not jeopardize the country’s food security or farmers’ livelihoods. A gradual shift to organic farming (currently practiced on less than 2% of our farmland) is ideal, but can take decades to accomplish.

Our health and environmental activists must rise above their demonise-and-ban approaches to grasp the bigger picture. They can do better than ridiculing senior scientists who don’t support populist notions. Effective policy advocacy in today’s world requires problem solving and collaboration – not conspiracy theories or confrontation.

Hijacking a human tragedy like CKDu for scoring cheap debating points is not worthy of any true activist or politician.

Proceedings of Dec 2013 NAASL National Symposium on CKDu are at: http://nas-srilanka.org/?page_id=1145

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene is on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com