Fake News in Indian General Election 2019: Interview with Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa, journalist, digital activist and founder of Medianama.com

Nikhil Pahwa is an Indian journalist, digital rights activist, and founder of MediaNama, a mobile and digital news portal. He has been a key commentator on stories and debates around Indian digital media companies, censorship and Internet and mobile regulation in India.

On the even of India’s general election 2019, Nalaka Gunawardene spoke to him in an email interview to find out how disinformation spread on social media and chat app platforms figures in election campaigning. Excerpts of this interview were quoted in Nalaka’s #OnlineOffline column in the Sunday Morning newspaper of Sri Lanka on 7 April 2019.

Nalaka: What social media and chat app platforms are most widely used for spreading mis and disinformation in the current election campaign in India?

Nikhil: In India, it’s as if we’ve been in campaigning mode ever since the 2014 elections got over: the political party in power, the BJP, which leveraged social media extensively in 2014 to get elected has continued to build its base on various platforms and has been campaigning either directly or, allegedly, through affiliates, ever since. They’re using online advertising, chat apps, videos, live streaming, and Twitter and Facebook to campaign. Much of the campaigning happens on WhatsApp in India, and messages move from person to person and group to group. Last elections we saw a fair about of humour: jokes were used as a campaigning tool, but there was a fair amount of misinformation then, as there has been ever since.

Are platforms sufficiently aware of these many misuses — and are they doing enough (besides issuing lofty statements) to tackle the problem?

Platforms are aware of the misuse: a WhatsApp video was used to incite a riot as far back as 2013. India has the highest number of internet shutdowns in the world: 134 last year, as per sflc.in. much of this is attributable to internet shutdowns, and the inability of local administration to deal with the spread of misinformation.

Platforms are trying to do what they can. WhatsApp has, so far, reduced the ability to forward messages to more than 5 people at a time. Earlier it was 256 people. Now people are able to control whether they can be added to a group without consent or not. Forwarded messages are marked as forwarded, so people know that the sender hasn’t created the message. Facebook has taken down groups for inauthentic behavior, robbing some parties of a reach of over 240,000 fans, for some pages. Google and Facebook are monitoring election advertising and reporting expenditure to the Election Commission. They are also supporting training of journalists in fact checking, and funding fact checking and research on fake news. These are all steps in the right direction, but given the scale of the usage of these platforms and how organised parties are, they can only mitigate some of the impact.

Does the Elections Commission have powers and capacity to effectively address this problem?

Incorrect speech isn’t illegal. The Election Commission has a series of measures announced, including a code of conduct from platforms, approvals for political advertising, take down of inauthentic content. I’m not sure of what else they can do, because they also have to prevent misinformation without censoring legitimate campaigning and legitimate political speech.

What more can and must be done to minimise the misleading of voters through online content?

I wish I knew! There’s no silver bullet here, and it will always be an arms race versus misinformation. There is great political incentive for political parties to create misinformation, and very little from platforms to control it.

WhatsApp 2019 commercial against Fake News in India

Avoiding ‘Cyber Nanny State’: Challenges of Social Media Regulation in Sri Lanka

Keynote speech delivered by science writer and digital media analyst Nalaka Gunawardene at the Sri Lanka National IT Conference held in Colombo from 2 to 4 October 2018.

Nalaka Gunawardene speaking at National IT Conference 2018 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Photo by ReadMe.lk

Here is a summary of what I covered (PPT embedded below):

With around a third of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people using at least one type of social media, the phenomenon is no longer limited to cities or English speakers. But as social media users increase and diversify, so do various excesses and abuses on these platforms: hate speech, fake news, identity theft, cyber bullying/harassment, and privacy violations among them.

Public discourse in Sri Lanka has been focused heavily on social media abuses by a relatively small number of users. In a balanced stock taking of the overall phenomenon, the multitude of substantial benefits should also be counted.  Social media has allowed ordinary Lankans to share information, collaborate around common goals, pursue entrepreneurship and mobilise communities in times of elections or disasters. In a country where the mainstream media has been captured by political and business interests, social media remains the ‘last frontier’ for citizens to discuss issues of public interest. The economic, educational, cultural benefits of social media for the Lankan society have not been scientifically quantified as yet but they are significant – and keep growing by the year.

Whether or not Sri Lanka needs to regulate social media, and if so in what manner, requires the widest possible public debate involving all stakeholders. The executive branch of government and the defence establishment should NOT be deciding unilaterally on this – as was done in March 2018, when Facebook and Instagram were blocked for 8 days and WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (to text only) owing to concerns that a few individuals had used these services to instigate violence against Muslims in the Eastern and Central Provinces.

In this talk, I caution that social media regulation in the name of curbing excesses could easily be extended to crack down on political criticism and minority views that do not conform to majority orthodoxy.  An increasingly insular and unpopular government – now in its last 18 months of its 5-year term – probably fears citizen expressions on social media.

Yet the current Lankan government’s democratic claims and credentials will be tested in how they respond to social media challenges: will that be done in ways that are entirely consistent with the country’s obligations under international human rights laws that have safeguards for the right to Freedom of Expression (FOE)? This is the crucial question.

Already, calls for social media regulation (in unspecified ways) are being made by certain religious groups as well as the military. At a recent closed-door symposium convened by the Lankan defence ministry’s think tank, the military was reported to have said “Misinformation directed at the military is a national security concern” and urged: “Regulation is needed on misinformation in the public domain.”

How will the usually opaque and unpredictable public policy making process in Sri Lanka respond to such partisan and strident advocacy? Might the democratic, societal and economic benefits of social media be sacrificed for political expediency and claims of national security?

To keep overbearing state regulation at bay, social media users and global platforms can step up arrangements for self-regulation, i.e. where the community of users and the platform administrators work together to monitor, determine and remove content that violates pre-agreed norms or standards. However, the presentation acknowledges that this approach is fraught with practical difficulties given the hundreds of languages involved and the tens of millions of new content items being published every day.

What is to be done to balance the competing interests within a democratic framework?

I quote the views of David Kaye, the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression from his June 2018 report to the UN Human Rights Council about online content regulation. He cautioned against the criminalising of online criticism of governments, religion or other public institutions. He also expressed concerns about some recent national laws making global social media companies responsible, at the risk of steep financial penalties, to assess what is illegal online, without the kind of public accountability that such decisions require (e.g. judicial oversight).

Kaye recommends that States ensure an enabling environment for online freedom of expression and that companies apply human rights standards at all  stages of their operations. Human rights law gives companies the tools to articulate their positions in ways that respect democratic norms and

counter authoritarian demands. At a minimum, he says, global SM companies and States should pursue radically improved transparency, from rule-making to enforcement of  the rules, to ensure user autonomy as individuals increasingly exercise fundamental rights online.

We can shape the new cyber frontier to be safer and more inclusive. But a safer web experience would lose its meaning if the heavy hand of government tries to make it a sanitized, lame or sycophantic environment. Sri Lanka has suffered for decades from having a nanny state, and in the twenty first century it does not need to evolve into a cyber nanny state.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවහිරයෙන් ඔබ්බට: නව නීති හා නියාමන අවශ්‍යද? Beyond Social Media block in Sri Lanka

This article, in Sinhala, appeared in Irida Lakbima broadsheet newspaper on Sunday, 18 March 2018 and is based on an interview with myself on Sri Lanka’s Social Media block that lasted from 7 to 15 March 2018.

I discuss Facebook’s Community Standards and the complaints mechanism currently in place, and the difficulties that non-English language content poses for Facebook’s designated monitors looking out for violations of these standards. Hate speech and other objectionable content produced in local languages like Sinhala sometimes pass through FB’s scrutiny. This indicates more needs to be done both by the platform’s administrators, as well as by concerned FB users who spot such content.

But I sound a caution about introducing new Sri Lankan laws to regulate social media, as that can easily stifle citizens’ right to freedom of expression to question, challenge and criticise politicians and officials. Of course, FoE can have reasonable and proportionate limits, and our challenge is to have a public dialogue on what these limits are for online speech and self-expression that social media enables.

Lakbima 18 March 2018

 

 

 

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවහිර කිරීම හා නව මාධ්‍ය භීතිකාව: 2018 මාර්තු 8 වනදා ලියූ සටහනක්

This comment on Sri Lanka’s social media blocking that commenced on 7 March 2018, was written on 8 March 2018 at the request of Irida Lakbima Sunday broadsheet newspaper, which carried excerpts from it in their issue of 11 March 2018. The full text is shared here, for the record.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවහිරය ඇරඹුනාට පසුවදා, 2018 මාර්තු 8 වනදා, ඉරිදා ලක්බිම පත්‍රයේ ඉල්ලීම පිට ලියන ලද කෙටි සටහනක්. මෙයින් උපුටා ගත් කොටස් 2018 මාර්තු 11 ඉරිදා ලක්බිමේ පළ වුණා.

Sunday Lakbima 11 March 2018

සමාජමාධ්‍ය අවහිර කිරීම හා නව මාධ්‍ය භීතිකාව:

– නාලක ගුණවර්ධන

‘‘අන්න සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ එකතු වෙලා රට ගිනි තියනවා!

නව සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන්ට දොස් තබන්නටම බලා සිටින උදවිය යළිත් වරක් මේ දිනවල මේ චෝදනාව මතු කරනවා. මොකක්ද මෙහි ඇත්ත නැත්ත?

2018 මාර්තු 7 වනදා රජය සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කිහිපයකට තාවකාලික සීමා පැනවූවා. හේතුව ලෙස දැක්වූයේ රටේ වාර්ගික ගැටුම් ඇති කරන පිරිස් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා තම ප්‍රහාරයන් සම්බන්ධීකරණය කරන බවට සාක්ෂි ලැබී ඇති බවයි.

මේ අනුව ෆේස්බුක්, ඉන්ස්ටග්‍රෑම් යන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා දෙකත්, WhatsApp හා Viber යන චැට් වේදිකා දෙකත් දින කීපයකට මෙරට සිට පිවිසීම අවහිර කොර තිබෙනවා. මේ නියෝගය දී ඇත්තේ ටෙලිකොම් නියාමන කොමිසමයි (TRCSL).

හදිසි අවස්ථාවක නීතිය හා සාමය රැකීමේ එක් පියවරක් ලෙස මේ තාවකාලික තහන්චිය සාධාරණීකරණය කළත්, මෙය සාර්ථක වේද යන්න සැක සහිතයි. අවහිර කරන වෙබ් අඩවි හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවලට අනියම් ක්‍රමවලින් හෙවත් proxy server හරහා පිවිසීමේ දැනුම සමහරුන් සතුයි.

වෛරීය ක්‍රියා සඳහා සමාජමාධ්‍ය අවභාවිත කරන අය කොහොමටත් පරිගණක තාක්ෂණය දන්නා නිසා මෙවැනි තහන්චියකින් ඔවුන් නතර කළ හැකිද යන්න රජය මෙනෙහි කළ යුතුයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවභාවිත කරන්නේ සාපේක්ෂව සුලු පිරිසක්. උදාහරණයකට අපේ රටේ මිලියන් හයකට වැඩි දෙනකුට ෆේස්බුක් ගිනුම් ඇති අතර එයින් වෛරීය පණිවුඩ පතුරුවන්නේ හා ප්‍රහාරවලට සන්නිවේදන කරන්නේ ටික දෙනකු පමණයි.

ඔවුන් පාලනය කරන්න පොලිසියට නොහැකි වීම නිසා සමස්ත මිලියන් හයටම ෆේස්බුක් ප්‍රවේශ වීම අවහිර කරන්න පියවර අරන්.

මේ නිසා ජාතීන් අතර සහජීවනය, සමගිය හා සාමය පිලිබඳ ෆේස්බුක් හරහා වටිනා පණිවුඩ දුන් කුමාර් සන්ගක්කාර වැනි අයගේ සන්නිවේදනත් මේ මොහොතේ සමාජගත් වන්නේ නැහැ. මුස්ලිම් ජනයා රැක ගන්න පෙරට ආ සිංහලයන් ගැන තොරතුරු ගලා යාමට ක්‍රමයක් ද නැහැ.

Popular meme – one among many – condemning Social Media Blocking in Sri Lanka in early March 2018

“සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ” කියා පිරිසක් ඇත්තටම නැහැ. ඒවා අපට වඩාත් හුරු ආකාරයේ විධිමත් ජනමාධ්‍ය නොවෙයි. ෆේස්බුක් වැනි වේදිකාවලට ගොඩ වන්නේ, ඒවායේ සේවා නොමිලයේ ලබන්නේ සාමාන්‍ය ජනයායි. බොහෝ කොටම පෞද්ගලික සාමීචි කතාවලට. විටින්විට දේශපාලන හා කාලීන වෙනත් කථාත් එහි මතු වනවා.

ඒත් සැබැවින්ම රට ගිනි තබන ජාතිවාදී, අවස්ථාවාදී මැරයෝ නම් ෆේස්බුක් තිබුණත් නැතත් තම ප්‍රචන්ඩත්වයට කෙසේ හෝ මාර්ග පාදා ගනීවි. නිසි ලෙස නීතිය සැමට එක ලෙස ක්‍රියාත්මක වනවා නම් මේ දාමරිකයන් අත් අඩන්ගුවට ගෙන උසාවි ගත කළ යුතුයි.

මා මාධ්‍ය වාරණයට විරුද්ධයි. ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වාරණයටත් විරුද්ධයි. බහුතරයක් අහිංසක, හිතකර සන්නිවේදන සිදුවන වේදිකාවක්, මැරයන් ටික දෙනකුද එහි ගොඩ වී නීතිවිරෝධී වැඩට භාවිත කළ පමණින් එය ගෙඩිපිටින් අවහිර කිරීම පරිනත ක්‍රියාවක් නොවෙයි.

මේ තර්කයම මොහොතකට තැපැල් සේවාවට නැතහොත් ජන්ගම දුරකථනවලට ආදේශ කළොත්? 1988-89 වකවානුවේ ජවිපෙ විසින් තර්ජනාත්මක ලිපි කීපයක් තැපෑලෙන් යැවූ නිසා සමස්ත ලියුම් බෙදිල්ලම විටින්විට නතර කළ බව අපට මතකයි.

ඒ මෝඩ ක්‍රියාවෙන් කී ලක්ෂයක් ලියුම් ප්‍රමාද වී ගොඩ ගැසුනාද? ලියුම් බෙදිල්ල නතර කළා කියා එවකට යටිබිම්ගත ප්‍රචන්ඩ දේශපාලනයක නිරතව සිටි ජවිපෙ සන්නිවේදන නතර වුණේ නැති බව නම් අපට මතකයි.

නූතන සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථයට අනුගත වන නව පන්නයේ නියාමන ක්‍රම හා ප්‍රතිපත්තිමය ප්‍රතිචාර අපට අවශ්‍යයි. එහි විවාදයක් නැහැ එහෙත් 20 වන සියවසේ වාරණ මානසිකත්වයෙන් 21 සියවසේ වෙබ් මාධ්‍යවලට ප්‍රතිචාර දක්වන්නට බැහැ.

බ්ලොක් කළ වෙබ් සේවාවලට අනුයක් ක්‍රම මගින් මැරයෝ පිවිසෙද්දී අහිංසක ජනයා එහි යා නොහැකිව ලත වීම පමණයි සිදුවන්නේ!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තවමත් සාපේක්ෂව අළුත් නිසා ඒවායේ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිත්වය හා සමාජීය බලපෑම ගැන අප සැවොම තවමත් අත්දැකීම් ලබමින් සිටිනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන ඉක්මන් නිගමනවලට එළඹෙන බොහෝ දෙනකු ඒ ගැන ගවේෂණාත්මක අධ්‍යයනයකින් නොව මතු පිටින් පැතිකඩ කිහිපයක් කඩිමුඩියේ දැකීමෙන් එසේ කරන අයයි.

තවත් සමහරුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කවදාවත් තමන් භාවිත කළ අයත් නොවෙයි! එහෙන් මෙහෙන් අහුලාගත් දෙයින් විරෝධතා නගනවා!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යනු බහුවිධ හා සංකීර්ණ සංසිද්ධියක්. එය හරි කලබලකාරී වේදිකාවක් නැතහොත් විවෘත පොළක් වගෙයි. අලෙවි කිරීමක් නැති වුවත් ඝෝෂාකාරී හා කලබලකාරී පොලක ඇති ගතිසොබාවලට සමාන්තර බවක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වනවා. එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයත් අතිශයින් විවිධාකාරයි.  එහි සංසරණය වන හා බෙදා ගන්නා සියල්ල ග‍්‍රහණය කරන්නට කිසිවකුටත් නොහැකියි.

Muslim intellectual demonises Social Media as ‘even more dangerous than physical violence against muslims’: Lakbima, 11 March 2018

Comment: Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase our exposure to fake news?

Facebook Explore feed: Experiment ends

On 1 March 2018, Facebook announced that it was ending its six-nation experiment known as ‘Explore Feed’. The idea was to create a version of Facebook with two different News Feeds: one as a dedicated place with posts from friends and family and another as a dedicated place for posts from Pages.

Adam Mosseri, Head of News Feed at Facebook wrote: “People don’t want two separate feeds. In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family.”

An international news agency asked me to write a comment on this from Sri Lanka, one of the six countries where the Explore feed was tried out from October 2017 to February 2018. Here is my full text, for the record:

Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase

our exposure to fake news?

Comment by Nalaka Gunawardene, researcher and commentator on online and digital media; Fellow, Internet Governance Academy in Germany

Despite its mammoth size and reach, Facebook is still a young company only 14 years old this year. As it evolves, it keeps experimenting – mistakes and missteps are all part of that learning process.

But given how large the company’s reach is – with over 2 billion users worldwide – there can be far reaching and unintended consequences.

Last October, Facebook split its News Feed into two automatically sorted streams: one for non-promoted posts from FB Pages and publishers (which was called “Explore”), and the other for contents posted by each user’s friends and family.

Sri Lanka was one of six countries where this trial was conducted, without much notice to users. (The other countries were Bolivia, Cambodia, Guatemala, Serbia, Slovakia.)

Five months on, Facebook company has found that such a separation did not increase connections with friends and family as it had hoped. So the separation will end — in my view, not a moment too soon!

What can we make of this experiment and its outcome?

Humans are complex creatures when it comes to how we consume information and how we relate to online content. While many among us like to look up what our social media ‘friends’ have recommended or shared, we remain curious of, and open to, content coming from other sources too.

I personally found it tiresome to keep switching back and forth between my main news feed and what FB’s algorithms sorted under the ‘Explore’ feed. Especially on mobile devices – through which 80% of Lankan web users go online – most people simply overlooked or forgot to look up Explore feed. As a result, they missed out a great deal of interesting and diverse content.

For me as an individual user, a key part of the social media user experience is what is known as Serendipity – accidentally making happy discoveries. The Explore feed reduced my chances of Serendipity on Facebook, and as a result, in recent months I found myself using Facebook less often and for shorter periods of time.

For publishers of online newspapers, magazines and blogs, Facebook’s unilateral decision to cluster their content in the Explore feed meant significantly less visibility and click-through traffic. Fewer Facebook users were looking at Explore feed and then going on to such publishers’ content.

I am aware of mainstream media houses as well as bloggers in Sri Lanka who suffered as a result. Publishers in the other five countries reported similar experiences.

For the overall information landscape too, the Explore feed separation was bad news. When updates or posts from mainstream news media and socially engaged organisations were coming through on a single, consolidated news feed, our eyes and ears were kept more open. We were less prone to being confined to the chatter of our friends or family, or being trapped in ‘eco chambers’ of the likeminded.

Content from reputed news media outlets and bloggers sometimes comes with their own biases, for sure, but these act as a useful ‘bulwark’ against fake news and mind-rotting nonsense that is increasing in Sri Lanka’s social media.

It was thus ill-advised of Facebook to have taken such content away and tucked it in a place called Explore that few of us bothered to visit regularly.

The Explore experiment may have failed, but I hope Facebook administrators learn from it to fine-tune their platform to be a more responsive and responsible place for global cacophony to evolve.

Indeed, the entire Facebook is an on-going, planetary level experiment in which all its 2 billion plus members are participating. Our common challenge is to balance our urge for self-expression and sharing with responsibility and restraint. The justified limitations on free speech continue to apply on new media too.

[written on 28 Feb 2018]

Challenges of Regulating Social Media – Toby Mendel in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene

Some are urging national governments to ‘regulate’ social media in ways similar to how newspapers, television and radio are regulated. This is easier said than done where globalized social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are concerned, because national governments don’t have jurisdiction over them.

But does this mean that globalized media companies are above the law? Short of blocking entire platforms from being accessed within their territories, what other options do governments have? Do ‘user community standards’ that some social media platforms have adopted offer a sufficient defence against hate speech, cyber bullying and other excesses?

In this conversation, Lankan science writer Nalaka Gunawardene discusses these and related issues with Toby Mendel, a human rights lawyer specialising in freedom of expression, the right to information and democracy rights.

Mendel is the executive director of the Center for Law and Democracy (CLD) in Canada. Prior to founding CLD in 2010, Mendel was for over 12 years Senior Director for Law at ARTICLE 19, a human rights NGO focusing on freedom of expression and the right to information.

The interview was recorded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 5 July 2017.

[Interview] “අතේ තිබෙන ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එක තරම්වත් ස්මාට් නැති උදවිය ගොඩක් ඉන්නවා!”

I have just given an interview to Sunday Lakbima, a broadsheet newspaper in Sri Lanka (in Sinhala) on social media in Sri Lanka – what should be the optimum regulatory and societal responses. The interviewer, young and digitally savvy journalist Sanjaya Nallaperuma, asked intelligent questions which enabled me to explore the topic well.

This is part of my advocacy work as a fellow of the Internet Governance Academy.

Irida Lakbima, 14 May 2017 – Interview with Nalaka Gunawardene on Social Media in Sri Lanka

විද්‍යා ලේඛක හා ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය පර්යේෂක නාලක ගුණවර්ධන මෙරට තොරතුරු සමාජයේ නැගී ඒම ගැන වසර විස්සකට වැඩි කලක් තිස්සේ විචාරශීලීව ලියන කියන අයෙකි. ජර්මනිය කේන්ද්‍ර කර ගත් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් නියාමනය පිළිබඳ ජාත්‍යාන්තර ඇකඩමියේ සම්මානිත පර්යේෂකයෙකි.

 ලංකාවේ සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවි භාවිතය මොන වගේ තැනකද තිබෙන්නේ?

2017 ඇරඹෙන විට මෙරට ජනගහනයෙන් 30%ක් පමණ (එනම් මිලියන් 5ක් පමණ) නිතිපතා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරමින් සිටි බව රාජ්‍ය දත්ත තහවුරු කළා. එහෙත් එහි බලපෑම ඉන් ඔබ්බට විශාල ජන පිරිසකට විහිදෙනවා. වෙබ්ගත වන ගුරුවරුන්, මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හා සමාජ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයින් ලබන තොරතුරු ඔවුන් හරහා විශාල පිරිසකට සමාජගත වන නිසා.

අඩු තරමින් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය එකක්වත් භාවිත කරන අය මිලියන 3.5ක් පමණ මෙරට සිටිනවා. ෆේස්බුක් තමයි ජනප්‍රියම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාව. එයට අමතරව වැනි වේදිකා හරහා ද ලක්ෂ ගණනක් අය තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප බෙදා ගන්නවා (ෂෙයාර් කරනවා). මේ තමයි නූතන සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථය.

සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවිවල පළවන දේ ලංකා සමාජයට කොතරම් බලපෑමක් කරනවාද?

වෙබ් කියන්නේ ඉතා විශාල හා විවිධාකාර අවකාශයක්. සංකල්පීය නිරවුල් බව අවශ්‍යයි.

ප්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය (පුවත්පත් හා සඟරා, රේඩියෝ, ටෙලිවිෂන්) ආයතනවල නිල වෙබ් අඩවි තිබෙනවා. මේ කවුද – මොනවද කරන්නෙ කියා ප්‍රකටයි. මේවා රටේ නීතිරීතිවලට අනුකූලව පවත්වා ගෙන යන ව්‍යාපාරයි. උපමිතියකින් මා මේවා සම කරන්නේ සුපර්මාකට් වගේ කියායි.

ඊළඟට වෙබ්ගතව පමණක් පවතින ආයතනගත වූ මාධ්‍ය තිබෙනවා. සමහරක් මේවා රට තුළත් අනෙක්වා රටින් පිට සිටත් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා. සැවොම ලියාපදින්චි වීත් නැහැ (එසේ කිරීම මෙරට කිසිදු නීතියකින් අනිවාර්ය නැති නිසා). මේවායේ පූර්ණකාලීනව නියැලෙන අය සිටිනවා. කතුවරුන් ප්‍රකාශකයන් සමහර විට ප්‍රකට නැහැ. මගේ උපමිතියට අනුව මෙවන් වෙබ් අඩවි තනිව ඇති කඩ සාප්පු වගේ. මේවා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නොවේ!

ෆේස්බුක්, ට්විටර්, ඉන්ස්ටග්‍රෑම් වැනි සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා හරහා කැරෙන තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප හුවමාරු ඉහත කී දෙවර්ගයටම වඩා වෙනස්. මෙවන් වේදිකාවලට ඕනැම කෙනකුට නොමිළේ බැඳිය හැකියි. ඉහළ පරිගණක දැනුමක් ඕනැ නැහැ. යම් බසකින් ටයිප් කරන්න නම් දැනගත යුතුයි. මේවා මහජන සන්නිවේදන වේදිකා මිස ආයතනගතව හෝ වෘත්තීය මට්ටමින් කැරෙන මාධ්‍ය නොවෙයි. මගේ උපමිතියට අනුව කලබලකාරී පොලක කැරෙන ඝෝෂාකාරී ගනුදෙනු වගෙයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන කථා කරන බොහෝ දෙනා මේ තුන පටලවා ගන්නවා. අප නිරවුල්ව ප්‍රශ්න විග්‍රහ කිරීම ඉතා වැදගත්. වෙබ් අවකාශයේ අපට හමු වන “සුපිරි වෙළඳසැල්”, “කඩ” හා “පොල” යන තුනේම වාසි මෙන්ම අවාසිත් තිබෙනවා. ඒවා ගැන හරිහැටි දැනගෙන තමයි ගොඩවිය යුත්තේ!

ලංකාවේ අපි සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවි භාවිතා කරන්නේ ඇබ්බැහියක් විදියටද?

ඕනැම සමාජයක නව තාක්ෂණයකට, නව මාධ්‍යයකට සීමාන්තිකව සමීප වන සුළුතරයක් සිටිය හැකියි. ඒ අයට මනෝවිද්‍යාත්මක ප්‍රතිකාර අවශ්‍ය විය හැකියි. එහෙත් බහුතරයකට එසේ ඇලී ගැලී සිටින්නට කාලයත් නෑ. අසීමිතව දත්ත භාවිතයට වියදම් කරන්නත් බෑ!

Facebook වැනි ලංකාවේ ප්‍රචලිත සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල පළවන දෑ කොතරම් සත්‍යතාවයකින් යුතු දේද?

දිනපතා හුවමාරු වන තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප /විඩියෝ කන්දරාව අතර හැම විදියේම දේ තිබෙනවා. ආ ගිය කතා, සතුටු සාමීචි, දේශපාලන වාද විවාද, සමාජ හා ආර්ථික කතා මෙන්ම අන්තවාදී ජාතිවාදය හෝ ආගම්වාදය පතුරුවන අන්තර්ගතයන් ද හමු වනවා.

මේවා සත්‍ය හෝ අසත්‍ය විය හැකියි. නැතිනම් ඒ දෙක අතර දෝලනය විය හැකියි. විචාරශීලීව මේවා ග්‍රහණය කරන්න අපේ බොහෝ දෙනා නොදන්න නිසා තමයි ප්‍රශ්න මතු වන්නේ. අපේ රටේ සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය තාමත් පහලයි. කුමන්ත්‍රණවාදී ප්‍රබන්ධ ගෙඩිපිටින් විශ්වාස කොට එය බෙදා ගන්නා (ෂෙයාර් කරන) පිරිස වැඩි එනිසයි.

ශ්‍රී ලංකාව හා සම්බන්ධ ව්‍යාජ පුවත් (Fake News) ෆේස්බුක් ඇතුළු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඔස්සේ පළ වන අවස්ථා ද ද තිබෙනවා. “ශ්‍රී ලාංකිකයන්ට වීසා බලපත්‍ර නොමැතිව ඇමරිකාවට ඇතුළු වීමට අවසර ලබා දෙමින් එරට ජනාධිපති ට්‍රම්ප් විධායක නියෝගයකට අත්සන් තබා ඇති” බවට මීට සති කීපයකට පෙර පළ වූ වාර්තාව ඊට එක් උදාහරණයක්.

එම පුවත සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඔස්සේ විශාල වශයෙන් ‘share’ වූ අතර කොළඹ පිහිටි ඇමරිකානු තානාපති කාර්යාලය නිවේදනයක් නිකුත් කරමින් කියා සිටියේ ශ්‍රී ලංකාව සම්බන්ධයෙන් ඇමරිකානු වීසා ප්‍රතිපත්තියේ කිසිදු වෙනසක් සිදුව නොමැති බවයි.

සමහර මෙවන් ප්‍රබන්ධ අහිංසක වින්දනයක් ගෙන දිය හැකි වුවත් සෞඛ්‍යය හා අධ්‍යාපනය වැනි කරුණු අලලා ගොතන බොරු කථාවලින් සමාජ හානි සිදු වන්නට පුළුවන්.

 සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශය විසින් බරවා පරීක්ෂා කිරීමට කටයුතු කරන විට ඒඩ්ස් බෝ කරන ලේ පරීක්ෂාවක් යැයි විශාල මතවාදයක් පැතිර ගියේ ඇයි?

සෞඛ්‍යය ගැන බොහෝ දෙනා සැළකිලිමත්. එනිසා බොරු ප්‍රචාර පතුරුවන්නොත් එයට අදාල වන්නට වැර දරනවා. රටේ එක් ජාතියක පිරිමි හා ගැහැණුන් පමණක් වඳ කරන්න ගන්නා “උත්සාහයන්” ගැන මෙන්ම HIV/AIDS ගැනත් බොරු භීතිකා විටින්විට යම් පිරිස් පතුරුවනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවල ස්වභාවය අනුව කවුරු කොතනින් පටන් ගත්තා ද යන්න සොයා ගැනීම අති දුෂ්කරයි. මේවා පැතිර යාම හැකි තාක් අවම කර ගැනීම තමයි අපට කළ හැක්කේ. එසේ නැතිව වාරණ, තහන්චි හෝ බ්ලොක් කිරීම අපරිණත ක්‍රියාවක්.

එවැනි තොරතුරු සොයා බැලීමකින් තොරව හුවමාරු කරගැනීම පෙළඹෙන්නේ ඇයි?

අපේ පොතේ උගතුන් බොහෝ දෙනකු පවා අභව්‍ය යමක් කියා රවටන්න ලෙහෙසියි. ලක් සමාජයේ ජනප්‍රිය “නවීන බිල්ලෝ” හදා ගෙන තිබෙනවා. විදෙස් රහස් ඔත්තු සේවා, වතිකානුව, ඉන්දීය රජය, බහුජාතික සමාගම් වැනි යමක් ඈඳා ගනිමින් කුමන හෝ අභව්‍ය කථාවක් ගොතා මුදා හැරියොත් දිගට හරහට පැතිරෙනවා.

කටකථා වගේ තමයි. අද සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා කටකථාවලට උත්තේජක හෙවත් “ස්ටීරොයිඩ්” ලැබෙනවා වගේ වැඩක් වෙනවා.

අපේ රටේ වෙබ් භාවිත කරන්නන්ගෙන් 80%කට වඩා එහි පිවිසෙන්නේ ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හෝ වෙනත් ජංගම උපාංග හරහායි. බොහෝ විට කඩිමුඩියේ. සංශයවාදීව, දෙතුන් වතාවක් සිතා බලා යම් තොරතුරක් ග්‍රහණය කර ගන්න ඉස්පාසුවක් දුවන ගමන් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට පිවිසෙන බොහෝ දෙනාට නෑ.

එවැන්නක් කරන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතයට තරම් ලංකාවේ සමාජය දියුණු නැති නිසාද?

මා නිතර කියන පරිදි අපේ රටේ සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය තාමත් පහලයි.  අතේ තිබෙන ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එක තරම්වත් ස්මාට් නැති උදවිය ගොඩක් ඉන්නවා! මේක ව්‍යක්ත ලෙස සන්නිවේදනය වන අවස්ථාවක් මම පසුගියදා ෆේස්බුක් තුළම දැක්කා. එහි තිබුණේ මෙයයි: “ෆේස්බුක් එකේ share වන හැම මගුලම ඇත්ත කියා ගන්න එපා!” යැයි “1802 ජූනි 16 වනදා මහනුවර මගුල් මඩුවේදී” ශ්‍රී වික්‍රම රාජසිංහ රජතුමා කියයි. දැන් අපේ සමහර මිනිස්සු ඕකත් ඇත්ත කියලා share කරනවා!

උපහාසයෙන්වත් අපේ විචාරශීලී වෙබ් භාවිතය හා සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය වැඩි කර ගත යුතුයි. මෙය දිගු කාලීන වැඩක්. ඉක්මන් විසඳුම් මෙවන් සමාජ ප්‍රශ්නවලට නැහැ.

මේ විදියට අසත්‍ය ප්‍රචාර ප්‍රචලිත කිරීමට සමාජ ජාල භාවිතා කිරීමේ ඉදිරි ප්‍රවනතාවයන් මොන වගේ වෙයිද

තවත් උපමිතියකින් විග්‍රහ කරනවා නම් ෆේස්බුක් වේදිකාව  හරියට ගාලුමුවදොර පිටිය වගේ. පොදු, විවෘත අවකාශයක්. එතැනට යන අය ජාතික ගීය කියනවාද, බැති ගී කියනවාද, පෙම් ගී කියනවාද, හූ කියනවාද යන්න පුද්ගලයා මත තීරණය වන්නක්.

සමහර විට එක් අයෙක් පටන් ගත්තාම අවට ඉන්න ටික දෙනෙක් හොඳ හෝ නරක යමකට එක් වනවා. එයට වෙනස් ප්‍රතිචාරද තිබිය හැකියි. සමහරුන් කිසිවක් නොකියා, වික්ෂිප්තව ඔහේ බලා සිටීවි. තවත් අයෙක් ‘ඔහෙලාට ඔල්මාදයද මේ වගේ හූ කියන්න’ කියා එයට අභියෝග කරාවි.

අපට සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල උදක්ම ඕනෑ කරන්නේ භාවිත කරන ප්‍රජාව තුළින්ම සදාචාරත්මක, ධනාත්මක සන්නිවේදන සඳහා ඉල්ලුම වැඩි කිරීමටයි. හූ කියන අය කොතැනත් සිටිය හැකියි. එහෙත් ඒ අය කොන් වෙනවා නම් දිගටම එසේ කරන එකක් නැහැ.

“සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ආචාර ධර්ම ඕනෑ” යයි කෑමොර දෙන උදවියට මා කියන්නේ මුලින්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය මොනවාදැයි තේරුම් ගන්න කියායි. ගාලුමුවදොර පිටියට ආචාරධර්ම රාමුවක් නිර්දේශ කරනු වෙනුවට එහි යන එන අය අශීලාචාර හැසිරීම්වලින් වළක්වා ගන්න තැත් කිරීමයි වැදගත්. මෙය පොලිසිය, දණ්ඩන පනවා කරන්න පුළුවන් දෙයක් නොවෙයි.

අසත්‍ය පළවීම් හමුවේ සමාජ ජාල ප්‍රවේශමෙන් පරිහරණය කිරීමට අප කටයුතු කළ යුත්තේ කෙසේද?

සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාව වැඩි කර ගැනීම හා භාවිත කරන ප්‍රජාව තුළින්ම ප්‍රමිතීන් (user community standards) ගොඩ නගා ගැනීම තමයි හොඳම මාර්ගය. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ අති බහුතරයක් සන්නිවේදන ප්‍රයෝජනවත් හා හරවත් ඒවා බව අමතක නොකරන්න.

එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා හරහා සිදුවන සන්නිවේදන ඉතා වැදගත් සමාජීය මෙහෙවරක් ඉටු කරනවා. වුවමනාවට වඩා බය පක්ෂපාතී වූ, අධිපතිවාදයන්ට නතු වූ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යයට යම් තරමකට හෝ විකල්ප අවකාශයක් මතු වන්නේ වෙබ් හරහා ලියැවෙන බ්ලොග් රචනා හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනය තුළින්. බ්ලොග් අවකාශය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වන ‘ගරු සරු නැති ගතිය’ (irreverence) අප දිගටම පවත්වා ගත යුතුයි.

මේ ගතිය අධිපතිවාදී තලයන්හි සිටින අයට, නැතිනම් ජීවිත කාලයක් පුරා අධිපතිවාදය ප‍්‍රශ්න කිරීමකින් තොරව පිළි ගෙන සිටින ගතානුගතිකයන්ට හා මාධ්‍ය ලොක්කන්ට නොරිස්සීම අපට තේරුම් ගත හැකියි. ඔවුන් මැසිවිලි නගන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නිසා සාරධර්ම බිඳ වැටනවා කියමින්. ඇත්තටම එහි යටි අරුත නම් පූජනීය චරිත ලෙස වැඳ ගෙන සිටින අයට/ආයතනවලට අභියෝග කැරෙන විට දෙවොලේ කපුවන් වී සිටින ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන්ට දවල් තරු පෙනීමයි!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පාලනය කරන්න යැයි ඔවුන් කෑගසන්නේ තම දේවාලේ ව්‍යාපාරවලට තර්ජනයක් මතු වීම හරහා කලබල වීමෙන්. මෙයින් මා කියන්නේ  ඕනෑම දෙයක් කීමට හෝ ලිවීමට ඉඩ දිය යුතුය යන්න නොවෙයි. එහෙත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය ඉතා සීරුවෙන් කළ යුත්තක් බවයි. නැතහොත් සමාජයක් ලෙස දැනට ඉතිරිව තිබෙන විවෘත සංවාද කිරීමට ඇති අවසාන වේදිකාවත් අධිපතිවාදයට හා සංස්කෘතික පොලිසියට නතු වීමේ අවදානම තිබෙනවා.

 

Social Media in Sri Lanka: Do Science and Reason Stand a Chance?

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on "Using Social Media for Discussing Science" at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on “Using Social Media for Discussing Science” at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka’s first Science and Technology for Society (STS) Forum took place from 7 to 10 September in Colombo. Organized by the Prime Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Research, it was one of the largest gatherings of its kind to be hosted by Sri Lanka.

Modelled on Japan’s well known annual STS forums, the event was attended by over 750 participants coming from 24 countries – among them local and foreign scientists, inventors, science managers, science communicators and students.

I was keynote speaker during the session on ‘Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics’. I used it to highlight how social media have become both a boon and bane for scientific information and thinking in Sri Lanka. This is due to peddlers of pseudo-science, anti-science and superstition being faster and better to adopt social media platforms than actual scientists, science educators and science communicators.

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka takes justified pride in its high literacy levels and equally high coverage of vaccination against infectious diseases. But we cannot claim to have a high level of scientific literacy. If we did, it would not be so easy for far-fetched conspiracy theories to spread rapidly even among educated persons. Social media tools have ‘turbo-charged’ the spread of associated myths, superstitions and conspiracy theories!

I cautioned: “Unless we make scientific literacy an integral part of everyone’s lives, ambitious state policies and programmes to modernize the nation could well be jeopardized. Progress can be undermined — or even reversed — by extremist forces of tribalism, feudalism and ultra-nationalism that thrive in a society that lacks the ability to think critically.”

It is not a case of all doom and gloom. I cited examples of private individuals creatively using social media to bust myths and critique all ‘sacred cows’ in Lankan society – including religions and military. These voluntary efforts contrast with much of the mainstream media cynically making money from substantial advertising from black magic industries that hoodwink and swindle the public.

My PowerPoint presentation:

 

Video recording of our full session:

 

The scoping note I wrote for our session:

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016. L to R - Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti & Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016.
L to R – Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti &
Smriti Daniel

Session: Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics

With 30 per cent of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people regularly using the Internet, web-based social media platforms have become an important part of the public sphere where myriad conversations are unfolding on all sorts of topics and issues. Facebook is the most popular social media outlet in Sri Lanka, with 3.5 million users, but other niche platforms like Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are also gaining ground. Meanwhile, the Sinhala and Tamil blogospheres continue to provide space for discussions ranging from prosaic to profound. Marketers, political parties and activist groups have discovered that being active in social media is to their advantage.

Some science and technology related topics also get discussed in this cacophony, but given the scattered nature of conversations, it is impossible to grasp the full, bigger picture. For example, some individuals or entities involved in water management, climate advocacy, mental health support groups and data-driven development (SDG framework) are active in Sri Lanka’s social media platforms. But who is listening, and what influence – if any – are these often fleeting conservations having on individual lifestyles or public policies?

Is there a danger that self-selecting thematic groups using social media are creating for themselves ‘echo chambers’ – a metaphorical description of a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an “enclosed” system, where different or competing views are dismissed, disallowed, or under-represented?

Even if this is sometimes the case, can scientists and science communicators afford to ignore social media altogether? For now, it appears that pseudo-science and anti-science sentiments – some of it rooted in ultra-nationalism or conspiracy theories — dominate many Lankan social media exchanges. The keynote speaker once described this as Lankan society permanently suspending disbelief. How and where can the counter-narratives be promoted on behalf of evidenced based, rational discussions? Is this a hopeless task in the face of irrationality engulfing wider Lankan society? Or can progressive and creative use of social media help turn the tide in favour of reason?

This panel would explore these questions with local examples drawn from various fields of science and skeptical enquiry.

 

 

[Echelon column] Balancing Broadband and Narrow Minds

This column originally appeared in Echelon business magazine, March 2014 issue. It is being republished here (without change) as part of a process to archive all my recent writing in one place – on this blog.

Image courtesy Echelon magazine

Image courtesy Echelon magazine

Balancing Broadband and Narrow Minds

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Are we cyber-stunted?

I posed this question some weeks ago at Sri Lanka Innovation Summit 2013 organised by Echelon and News 1st. We were talking about how to harness the web’s potential for spurring innovation.

We cannot innovate much as a society when our broadband is stymied by narrow minds. How many among the (at least) 3.5 million Lankans who regularly access the web have the right mindset for making the best use of the medium, I asked.

We didn’t get to discuss it much there, but this bothers me. Sri Lanka has now had 19 years of commercial Internet connectivity (the first ISP, Lanka Internet Services, started in April 1995). That’s a long time online: we have gone past toddler years and childhood (remember dial-up, anyone?) and been through turbulent ‘teen years’ as well.

Technology and regulation have moved on, imperfect though the latter maybe. But psychologically, as a nation we have yet to find our comfort level with the not-so-new medium.

There are various indicators for this. Consider, for example, the widespread societal apprehensions about social media, frequent web-bashing by editorialists in the mainstream media, and the apparent lack of public trust in e-commerce services. These and other trends are worth further study by social scientists and anthropologists.

Another barometer of cyber maturity is how we engage each other online, i.e. the tone of comments and interactions. This phenomenon is increasingly common on news and commentary websites; it forms the very basis of social media.

Agree to disagree?

‘Facts are sacred, comment is free’ is a cherished tenet in journalism and public debates. But expressing unfashionable opinions or questioning the status quo in Lankan cyber discussions can attract unpleasant reactions. Agreeing to disagree rarely seems an option.

Over the years, I have had my share of online engagement – some rewarding, others neutral and a few decidedly depressing. These have come mostly at the multi-author opinion platforms where I contribute, but sometimes also through my own blogs and twitterfeed.

One trend seems clear. In many discussions, the ‘singer’ is probed more than the ‘song’. I have been called unkind names, my credentials and patriotism questioned, my publishers’ bona fides doubted, and my (usually moderate) positions attributed to personality disorders or genetic defects! There have been a few threats too (“You just wait – we’ll deal with traitors soon!”).

I know those who comment on mainstream political issues receive far more invective. Most of this is done under the cover of anonymity or pseudonymity. These useful web facilities – which protect those criticising the state or other powerful interests – are widely abused in Lankan cyberspace to malign individuals expressing uncommon views.

There are some practical reasons, too, why our readers may misunderstand what we write, or take offence needlessly.

Poor English comprehension must account for a good share of web arguments. Many fail to grasp (or appreciate) subtlety, intentional rhetoric and certain metaphors. Increasingly, readers react to a few key words or phrases in longer piece — without absorbing its totality.

A recent example is my reflective essay ‘Who Really Killed Mel Gunasekera?’. I wrote it in early February shortly after a highly respected journalist friend was murdered in her suburban home by a burglar.

I argued that we were all responsible, collectively, for this and other rising incidents of violence. I saw it as the residual product of Lankan society’s brutalisation during war years, made worse by economic marginalisation. Rather than barricading ourselves and living in constant fear, we should tackle the root causes of this decay, I urged.

The plea resonated well beyond Mel’s many friends and admirers. But some readers were more than miffed. They (wrongly) reduced my 1,100 words to a mere comparison of crime statistics among nations.

I aim to write clearly, and also probe beyond headlines and statistics. But is such nuance a lost art when many online readers merely scan or speed-read what we labour on? In today’s fast-tracked world, can reflective writing draw discerning readers and thoughtful engagement any longer? I wonder.

Too serious

Then there is the humour factor – or the lack of it. Many among us don’t get textual satire, as Groundviews.org discovered with its sub-brand called Banyan News Reporters (BNR). Their mock news items and spoofs were frequently taken literally – and roundly condemned.

The web is a noisy place, but some stand out in that cacophony because of their one-tracked minds. They are those who perceive and react to everything through a pet topic or peeve. That ‘lens’ may be girls vs boys, or lions vs tigers, or capitalism vs socialism or something else. No matter what the topic, such people will always sing same old tune!

Tribal divisions are among the most entrenched positions, and questioning matters of faith assures a backlash. It seems impossible to discuss secularism in Sri Lanka without seemingly offending all competing brands of salvation! (The last time I tried, they were bickering among themselves long after I quietly left the platform…)

Oh sure, everybody is entitled to a bee or two in her bonnet. But what to do with those harbouring an entire bee colony — which they unleash at the slightest provocation?

I just let them be (well, most of the time). I used to get affected by online abuse from cloaked detractors but have learnt to take it with equanimity. This is what economist and public intellectual W A Wijewardena also recommends.

“You must treat commentators as your own teachers; some make even the most stupid comment in the eyes of an intelligent person, but that comment teaches us more than anything else,” he wrote in a recent Facebook discussion.

He added: “Individual wisdom and opinions are varied and one cannot expect the same type of intervention by all. I always respect even the most damaging comment made by some on what I have written!”

Moderating extreme comments is a thankless and challenging job for those operating opinion platforms. If they are too strict or cautious, they risk diluting worthwhile public debates for which space is shrinking in the mainstream media. At the same time, hate speech peddlers cannot be allowed free license in the name of free speech.

Where to draw the line? Each publisher must evolve own guidelines.

Groundviews.org, whose vision is to “enable civil, progressive and inclusive discussions on democracy, rights, governance and peace in Sri Lanka” encourages “a collegial, non-insulting tone” in all contributors. It also reminds readers that “comments containing hate speech, obscenity and personal attacks will not be approved.”

Colombo Telegraph, another popular opinion and reporting website, “offers a right to reply for any individual or organisation who feels they have been misreported”. Sadly, this courtesy is not available in many online news and commentary websites carrying Lankan content.

In the end, even the most discerning publishers and editors can do only so much. As more Lankans get online and cyber chatter increases, we have to evolve more tolerant and pluralistic ways of engagement.

An example of cyber intolerance and name-calling: one of many...

An example of cyber intolerance and name-calling from December 2014, during the campaign for Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election (when Bollywood’s Salman Khan was brought to Sri Lanka to promote then incumbent Mahinda Rajapalksa’s election campaign)