Night of Ideas in Colombo: Panel on Freedom of Expression and Cartooning

L to R - Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

L to R – Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

On 26 January 2017, the Alliance Française de Kotte with the Embassy of France in Sri Lanka presented the first ever “Night of Ideas” held in Colombo. During that event, participants were invited to engage in discussions on ‘‘A World in common – Freedom of Expression (FOE)” in the presence of French and Sri Lankan cartoonists, journalists and intellectuals.

I was part of the panel that also included: Kianoush Ramezani, Founder and President of United Sketches (Paris), an Iranian artist and activist living and working in Paris since 2009 as a political refugee; and Gihan de Chickera, Political cartoonist at the Daily Mirror newspaper in Sri Lanka. The panel was moderated by Amal Jayasinghe, bureau chief of Agence France Presse (AFP) news agency.

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

In my opening remarks, I paid a special tribute to Sri Lanka’s cartoonists and satirists who provided a rare outlet for political expression during the Rajapaksa regime’s Decade of Darkness (2005-2014).

I referred to my 2010 essay, titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter’ where I had highlighted this vital aspect of FOE. Here is the gist of it:

A useful barometer of FOE and media freedom in a given society is the level of satire that prevails. Satire and parody are important forms of political commentary that rely on blurring the line between factual reporting and creative license to scorn and ridicule public figures.

Political satire is nothing new: it has been around for centuries, making fun of kings, emperors, popes and generals. Over time, satire has manifested in many oral, literary and theatrical traditions. In recent decades, satire has evolved into its own distinctive genre in print, on the airwaves and online.

Satire offers an effective – though not always fail-safe – cover for taking on authoritarian regimes that are intolerant of criticism, leave alone any dissent. No wonder the former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc inspired so much black humour.

This particular dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest political commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis in the media is actually gossip.

A good summary of our panel discussion reported by Daily News, 30 January 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Night of Ideas in Colombo - promotional brochure

Night of Ideas in Colombo – promotional brochure

 

Advertisements

සිවුමංසල කොලුගැටයා #284: දකුණු ආසියානු රජයන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයේ සියුම් මුහුණුවර හඳුනා ගනිමු

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala, appearing in the print issue of 18 Sep 2016), I discuss new forms of media repression being practised by governments in South Asia.

The inspiration comes from my participation in the Asia Media Conference organized by the Hawaii-based East-West Center in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016. Themed “South Asia Looking East”, it drew over 350 participants from across Asia and the United States.

Speeches and discussions showed how governments are more concerned about international media rights watch groups tracking the imprisonment and physical harassment of media and journalists. So their tactics of repression have changed to unleash bureaucratic and legal harassment on untamed and unbowed journalists. And also to pressurising advertisers to withdraw.

Basically this is governments trying to break the spirit and commercial viability of free media instead of breaking the bones of outspoken journalists. And it does have a chilling effect…

In this column, I focus on two glaring examples that were widely discussed at the Delhi conference.

In recent months, leading Bangladeshi editor Mahfuz Anam has been sued simultaneously across the country in 68 cases of defamation and 18 cases of sedition – all by supporters of the ruling party. Anam was one of six exceptional journalists honoured during the Delhi conference “for their personal courage in the face of threats, violence and harassment”.

In August, an announcement was made on the impending suspension of regional publication of Himal Southasian, a pioneering magazine promoting ‘cross-border journalism’ in the South Asian region. The reason was given as “due to non-cooperation by regulatory state agencies in Nepal that has made it impossible to continue operations after 29 years of publication”.

Bureaucracy is pervasive across South Asia, and when they implement commands of their political masters, they become formidable threats to media freedom and freedom of expression. Media rights watch groups, please note.

”බලවත් රජයක් හා ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය අතර ගැටුමකදී නිරන්තරයෙන්ම පාහේ මුල් වට කිහිපය ජය ගන්නේ රජයයි. බලපෑම් හා පීඩන කළ හැකි යාන්ත්‍රණ රැසක් රජය සතු නිසා. එහෙත් අන්තිමේදී ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය ජය ලබනවා!”

”කියවන විට ලිවීම සිය මාධ්‍ය කලාව ලෙස නිර්වචනය කර ගත් කීකරු මාධ්‍යවලට නම් කිසිදු රටක රජයකින් හෝ වෙනත් බල කේන‍ද්‍රවලින් තාඩන පීඩන එල්ල වන්නේ නැහැ. එහෙත් එසේ නොකරන, පොදු උන්නතිය වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටින මාධ්‍යවලට (free press) පන්න පන්නා හිරිහැර කරන සැටි දේශපාලකයන් මෙන්ම නිලධාරී තන්ත්‍රය හොඳහැටි දන්නවා. හීලෑ කර ගත නොහැකි මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හා කතුවරුන් හිරේ දැමීම, ඔවුන්ට පහරදීම හෝ මරා දැමීම බරපතළ ලෝක විවේචනයට ලක් වන නිසා ඊට වඩා සියුම් අන්දමින් මාධ්‍යවලට හිරිහැර කිරීමට දකුණු ආසියානු ආණ්ඩු දැන් නැඹුරු වී සිටිනවා, මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට එල්ල වන ප්‍රකට තර්ජන (භෞතික ප්‍රහාර හා නිල ප්‍රවෘත්ති පාලනයන්) ගැන ඇස යොමා ගෙන සිටින ජාත්‍යන්තර ආයතනවලට පවා මේවා හරිහැටි ග්‍රහණය වන්නේ නැහැ!”

මේ වටිනා විග්‍රහයන්ට මා සවන් දුන්නේ 2016 සැප්තැම්බර් 8-11 දින කිහිපය තුළ ඉන්දියාවේ නවදිල්ලියේ පැවති ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍ය සමුළුවකදී (East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference).  අමෙරිකාවේ හවායිහි පිහිටි ඊස්ට්-ටෙස්ට් කේන‍ද්‍රය තවත් කලාපීය හා ඉන්දීය පාර්ශ්වකරුවන් සමග සංවිධානය කළ මේ සමුළුවට රටවල් හතළිහකින් පමණ 350කට වැඩි මාධ්‍යවේදී පිරිසක් සහභාගි වුණා.

මා එහි ගියේ ආරාධිත කථීකයෙක් හා එක් සැසි වාරයක මෙහෙයවන්නා ලෙසින්.

තොරතුරු අයිතිය, විද්‍යුත් ආවේක්ෂණය, සමාජ මාධ්‍ය, ගවේෂණාත්මක මාධ්‍යකරණය, පාරිසරික වාර්තාකරණය ආදී විවිධ තේමා යටතේ සැසිවාර හා සාකච්ඡා රැසක් තිබුණත් වැඩිපුරම අවධානය යොමු වුණේ මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට එල්ල වන පීඩන හා තර්ජන ගැනයි.

මෙය දේශපාලන සංවාදයකට සීමා නොවී මාධ්‍යවල වෘත්තියභාවය, ආචාරධර්මීය ක්‍රියා කලාපය හා මාධ්‍ය-රජය තුලනය ආදී පැතිකඩද කතාබහ කෙරුණා.

Mahfuz Anam speaks at East West Center Media Conference in Delhi

Mahfuz Anam speaks at East West Center Media Conference in Delhi

සමුළුවේ ප්‍රධාන භූමිකාවන් රඟපෑවේ (සහ මාධ්‍ය නිදහස උදෙසා අරගල කිරීම සඳහා පිරිනැමුණු විශේෂ සම්මානයක් හිමි කර ගත්තේ) මෆූස් අනාම් (Mahfuz Anam) මාධ්‍යවේදියායි.ඔහු බංග්ලාදේශයේ අද සිටින ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨතම එසේම ලොව පිළිගත් පුවත්පත් කතුවරයෙක්. කලක් යුනෙස්කෝ සංවිධානයේ තනතුරක් හෙබ වූ ඔහු සියරට ආවේ මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයේ සක්‍රිය වීමටයි.

ඔහු එරට මුල්පෙළේ පුවත්පතක් වන Daily Star කතුවරයා මෙන්ම ප්‍රකාශකයාද වනවා. ඩේලි ස්ටාර් බංගල්දේශයේ වඩාත්ම අලෙවි වන ඉංග්‍රීසි පුවත්පතයි. එය මීට වසර 25කට පෙර අනාම් ඇරඹුවේ එරට මිලිටරි පාලනයකින් යළිත් ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදී මාවතට පිවිසි පසුවයි.

ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය, පුරවැසි අයිතිවාසිකම්, විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණය හා රාජ්‍ය විනිවිදභාවය වැනි පරමාදර්ශයන් වෙනුවෙන් ඔහුත්, ඔහුගේ පුවත්පතත් කවදත් පෙනී සිටිනවා.

බංග්ලාදේශයේ අතිශයින් ධ්‍රැවීකරණය වී ඇති පක්ෂ දේශපාලනය ඔහු විවෘතවම විවේචනය කරනවා. මේ නිසා දේශපාලකයන් ඔහුට කැමති නැහැ. මීට පෙරද නොයෙක් පීඩනයන් එල්ල වුවත් ඔහුගේ මාධ්‍ය කලාවට ලොකුම තර්ජනය මතු වී ඇත්තේ ෂේක් හසීනා වත්මන් අගමැතිනියගේ රජයෙන්.

බලයේ සිටින ඕනෑම රජයක් සහේතුකව විවේචනය කිරීම අනාම්ගේ ප්‍රතිපත්තියයි. අධිපතිවාදී රාජ්‍ය පාලනයක් ගෙන යන හසීනා අගමැතිනියට මෙය කිසිසේත් රුස්සන්නේ නැහැ. ඇය, ඇගේ ආන්දෝලනාත්මක පුත්‍රයා හා දේශපාලන අනුගාමිකයන් ඩේලි ස්ටාර් පත්‍රයට හිරිහැර කිරීමට පටන් ගත්තේ මීට වසර 3කට පමණ පෙරයි.

එහෙත් එය උත්සන්න වූයේ 2016 පෙබරවාරියේ. එරට ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවක් සමඟ කළ සාකච්ඡාවකදී අනාම් එක්තරා පාපෝච්චාරණයක් කළා. වත්මන් අගමැතිනිය 2007දී විපක්ෂ නායිකාව ලෙස සිටියදී ඇයට එරෙහිව මතු වූ දුෂණ චෝදනා සිය පුවත්පතේ පළ කිරීම ගැන ඔහු කණගාටුව ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

එවකට එරට පාලනය කළේ හමුදාව විසින් පත් කළ,  ඡන්දයකින් නොතේරුණු රජයක්. එම රජය හසීනා අගමැතිනියට එරෙහිව මතු කළ දූෂණ චෝදනා, නිසි විමර්ශනයකින් තොරව සිය පත්‍රයේ පළ කිරීම කර්තෘ මණ්ඩල අභිමතය අනිසි ලෙස භාවිත කිරීමක් (poor editorial judgement) බව ඔහු ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පිළිගත්තා.

එම දූෂණ චෝදනා එරට වෙනත් බොහෝ මාධ්‍යද එවකට පළ කරන ලද නමුත් මෙසේ කල් ගත වී හෝ ඒ ගැන පසුතැවීමක් සිදු කර ඇත්තේ ඩේලි ස්ටාර් කතුවරයා පමණයි.

කතුවරුන් යනු අංග සම්පූර්ණ මිනිසුන් නොවෙයි. ඔවුන් අතින් ද වැරදි සිදු වනවා. ඒවා පිළිගෙන සමාව අයැද සිටීම අගය කළ යුත්තක්.

එහෙත් මේ  පාපොච්චාරණයෙන් හසීනා පාක්ෂිකයෝ දැඩි කෝපයට පත් වූවා. මහජන ඡන්දයෙන් නොව බලහත්කාරයෙන් බලයේ සිටි රජයක් එකල විපක්ෂ නායිකාවට කළ චෝදනා පත්‍රයේ පළ කිරීම ඇය දේශපාලනයෙන් ඉවත් කිරීමට කළ කුමන්ත්‍රණයක කොටසක් බව ඔවුන් තර්ක කළා.

අනාම් මේ තර්කය ප්‍රතික්ෂේප කරනවා. 2007-8 හමුදාමය රජයට එරෙහිව තමන් කතුවැකි 203ක් ලියමින් ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය යළි ස්ථාපිත කරන මෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටි බව ඔහු මතක් කරනවා. එසේම දූෂණ චෝදනා මත හසීනා අත්අඩංගුවට ගත් විට එයට එරෙහිව ප්‍රබල විරෝධතා මතු කළේත් තම පත්‍රය බව ඔහු කියනවා. (2008දී හසීනාගේ අවාමි ලීගය යළි බලයට පත් වූ විට එම චෝදනා සියල්ල කිසිදු  විභාග කිරීමකින් තොරව අත්හැර දමනු ලැබුවා.)

Mahfuz Anam, center, the editor of The Daily Star, Bangladesh’s most popular English-language newspaper, outside a court in Rangpur District, March 2016

Mahfuz Anam, center, the editor of The Daily Star, Bangladesh’s most popular English-language newspaper, outside a court in Rangpur District, March 2016 [Photo courtesy The New York Times]

පෙබරවාරි ටෙලිවිෂන් සාකච්ඡාවෙන් පසු සති කිහිපයක් තුළ රටේ විවිධ ප්‍රදේශවල උසාවිවල අනාම්ට එරෙහිව අපහාස නඩු හා රාජ්‍ය ද්‍රෝහිත්වය (sedition) අරභයා නඩු දුසිම් ගණනක් ගොනු කරනු ලැබුවා. මේ එකම නඩුවකටවත් බංග්ලාදේශ රජය සෘජුව සම්බන්ධ නැහැ. නඩු පැමිණිලිකරුවන් වන්නේ හසීනාගේ පාක්ෂිකයෝ.

මේ වන විට අපහාස නඩු 68ක් හා රාජ්‍ය ද්‍රෝහිත්වයට එරෙහි  නඩු 18ක් විභාග වෙමින් තිබෙනවා. මේවාට පෙනී සිටීමට රට වටේ යාමටත් වග උත්තර බැඳීමටත් ඔහුට සිදුව තිබෙනවා.

නඩු පැවරීමට අමතරව වෙනත් උපක්‍රම හරහාද තම පත්‍රයට හිරිහැර කරන බව අනාම් හෙළි කළා. පත්‍රයට නිතිපතා දැන්වීම් ලබා දෙන ප්‍රධාන පෙළේ සමාගම් රැසක් රාජ්‍ය බලපෑම් හමුවේ නොකැමැත්තෙන් වුවත් එය නතරකොට තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා ඩේලිස්ටාර් දැන්වීම් ආදායම 40%කින් පහත වැටිලා.

”එහෙත් මධ්‍යම හා කුඩා පරිමානයේ දැන්වීම්කරුවන් දිගටම අපට දැන්වීම් දෙන බවට ප්‍රතිඥා දී තිබෙනවා. මේ ව්‍යාපාරිකයන්ගේ කැපවීම අගය කළ යුතුයි. ආණ්ඩු බලයට නතු නොවී, බිය නොවී, ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යවලට අනුග්‍රහය දක්වන ව්‍යාපාර ඉතිරිව තිබීම අපට ලොකු සවියක්” අනාම් ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

කුඩා හා මධ්‍යම පරිමාන දැන්වීම් කරුවන්ට අමතරව බංගලාදේශයේ වෘත්තිකයන්, බුද්ධිමතුන් හා කලාකරුවන්ද ඩේලිස්ටාර් හා එහි කතුවරයා වෙනුවෙන් කථා කරනවා. සෙසු (තරඟකාරී) මාධ්‍ය කෙසේ වෙනත් මහජනයා මෙසේ ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යවල නිදහස වෙනුවෙන් කථා කිරීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

මාධ්‍ය නිදහස රැකීමට වීදි උද්ඝෝෂණ කළාට පමණක් මදි. අන්තවාදීන්ගේ හා මර්දනකාරී ආණ්ඩුවල පීඩනයට ලක් වන මාධ්‍ය ආයතනවලට ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ සහාය දැක්වීම ද අවශ්‍යයි.

නවදිල්ලි සමුළුවේ අවධානයට ලක් වූ තවත් මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයක් නම් නේපාලයේ කත්මණ්ඩු අගනුවරින් පළ කැරෙන හිමාල් (Himal) සඟරාවේ අර්බුදයයි.

Kanak Mani Dixit (left) and Kunda Dixit struggling to save Himal South Asian magazine

Kanak Mani Dixit (left) and Kunda Dixit struggling to save Himal South Asian magazine

හිමාලයට සාමුහිකව හිමිකම් කියන භූතානය, ඉන්දියාව, නේපාලය, ටිබෙටය, පකිස්ථානය හා චීනය යන රටවල් කෙරෙහි මුලින් අවධානය යොමු කළ මේ ඉංග්‍රීසි සඟරාව, වසර කිහිපයකින් සමස්ත දකුණු ආසියාවම ආවරණය කැරෙන පරිදි Himal Southasian නමින් යළි නම් කළා.

සාක් කලාපයේ රටවල (විශේෂයෙන් ඉන්දියාවේ) හොඳ කාලීන පුවත් සඟරා ඇතත් දකුණු ආසියාව ගැන පොදුවේ කථා කරන එකම වාරික ප්‍රකාශනය මෙයයි. ජාතික දේශසීමාවලින් ඔබ්බට ගොස් සංසන්දනාත්මකව හා තුලනාත්මකව සමාජ, ආර්ථීක, දේශපාලනික හා සංස්කෘතික ප්‍රශ්න ගවේෂණය කිරීම දශක තුනක් තිස්සේ හිමාල් සඟරාව ඉතා හොඳින් සිදු කරනවා.

2016 අගෝස්තු 24 වනදා හිමාල් සඟරාවේ ප්‍රකාශකයන් වන දකුණු ආසියානු භාරය (Southasia Trust) විශේෂ නිවේදනයක් නිකුත් කරමින් කියා සිටියේ නේපාල රජයේ ආයතනවලින් දිගින් දිගටම මතුව ඇති බාධක හා අවහිර කිරීම් නිසා කණගාටුවෙන් නමුත් සඟරාව පළ කිරීම නතර කරන බවයි.

”හිමාල් නිහඬ කරනු ලබන්නේ නිල මාධ්‍ය වාරණයකින් හෝ සෘජු භෞතික පහරදීමකින් හෝ නොවෙයි. නිලධාරිවාදයේ දැඩි හස්තයෙන් අපට හිරිහැර කිරීමෙන්. කිසිදු දැනුම් දීමකින් හෝ චෝදනාවකින් තොරව අපට ලැබෙන ආධාර සියල්ල අප කරා ළඟා වීම වළක්වා තිබෙනවා. අපේ සියලු ගිණුම් වාර්තා ඉහළ මට්ටමක ඇති බවත්, සියලු කටයුතු නීත්‍යනුකූල බවත් රාජ්‍ය ආයතන සහතික කළත්, අපට එල්ල වන පරිපාලනමය බාධක අඩු වී හෝ නතර වී නැහැ” එම නිවේදනයේ සඳහන් වුණා.

වෘත්තීය කර්තෘ මණ්ඩලයක් මඟින් සංස්කරණය කැරෙන, ලිපි ලියන ලේඛකයන්ට ගරුසරු ඇතුව ගෙවීම් කරන, දැන්වීම් ඉතා සීමිත මේ සඟරාවේ නඩත්තු වියදම පියවා ගත්තේ දෙස් විදෙස් දානපති ආධාරවලින්. සඟරාවට ආධාර ළඟා වීම වැළැක්වීම හරහා එය හුස්ම හිරකර මරා දැමීම එහි විරද්ධවාදීන්ගේ උපක්‍රමයයි.

මෙසේ කරන්නේ ඇයි? හිමාල් සඟරාවේ ආරම්භකයා හා අද දක්වාත් සභාපතිවරයා නේපාල ක්‍රියාකාරීක හා මගේ දිගු කාලීන මිත්‍ර කනක් මානි ඩික්සිත් (Kanak Mani Dixit). 2012 අගෝස්තු 12 මගේ තීරු ලිපියෙන් සිංහල පාඨකයන්ට ඔහුගේ ප්‍රතිපත්තිමය අරගලයන් මා හඳුන්වා දුන්නා.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #78: කනක් මානි ඩික්සිත් – හිමාල කඳු සොළවන පුංචි වැඩකාරයා

කනක්ගේ මාධ්‍ය විවේචන හමුවේ දැඩි ලෙසි උරණ වී ඔහුට නිලබලයෙන් පහර දීමට මූලිකව සිටින්නේ නේපාලයේ බලය අයථා ලෙස භාවිත කිරීම විමර්ශනය කරන රාජ්‍ය කොමිසමේ ප්‍රධානියා වන ලෝක්මාන් සිං කාර්කි.

2013 දී කාර්කි මේ තනතුරට පත් කරන විට ඔහු එයට නොසුදුසු බව කනක් ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පෙන්වා දුන්නා. එහෙත් දේශපාලකයන් පත්වීම ස්ථීර කළ අතර එතැන් පටන් මේ නිලධාරීයා නිල බලය අයථා ලෙස යොදා ගනිමින් සිය විවේචකයන්ට හිරිහැර කිරීම ඇරඹුවා.

2016 අප්‍රේල් මාසයේ දූෂණ චෝදනා මත කනක් ඩික්සින් අත් අඩංගුවට ගෙන ටික දිනක් රඳවා තැබුණා. මේ ගැන එරට හා විදෙස් මාධ්‍ය හා මානව හිමිකම් සංවිධාන දැඩි විරෝධය පළ කළා. අන්තිමේදී කනක් සියලු චෝදනාවලට නිදොස් කොට නිදහස් කරනු ලැබුවේ නේපාල ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය විසින්.

කනක්ට සෘජුව හිරිහැර කිරීම ඉන් පසු අඩු වූවත් ඔහු සම්බන්ධ මාධ්‍ය ප්‍රකාශන, ස්වේච්ඡා ආයතන හා සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධානවලට නොයෙක් බලපෑම් කිරීම දිගටම සිදු වනවා.

හිමාල් සඟරාවට හා දකුණු ආසියාව භාරයට හිරිහැර කිරීම මේ ප්‍රහාරයන්ගේ එක් පියවරක්. මේ අත්තනෝමතික නිලධාරියාට දේශපාලන බලයද ඇති නිසා අන් නිලධාරීන්  ඔහුට එරෙහි වීමට බියයි.

රාජ්‍ය තන්ත්‍රයේ මුළු බලය යොදා ගෙන පුංචි (එහෙත් නොනැමෙන) සඟරාවකට හිරිහැර කරන විට එයට එරෙහිව හඬක් නැගීමට බොහෝ නේපාල මාධ්‍ය ආයතන  පැකිලෙනවා. එයට හේතුව මර්දකයා තමන් පසුපස ද එනු ඇතැයි බියයි. මේ අතින් නේපාල තත්ත්වය බංග්ලාදේශයට වෙනස්.

පොදු උන්නතිය වෙනුවෙන් නිර්ව්‍යාජව පෙනී සිටින මාධ්‍ය ආයතනයක් හා කතුවරයෙක් මර්දනයට ලක් වූ විට ඔවුන් වෙනුවෙන් හඬ නැගීම ශිෂ්ඨ සමාජයක කාගේත් වගකීමක්. හිමාල් සඟරාව හා කනක් ඩික්සින් වෙනුවෙන් මේ හඬ වැඩිපුරම මතුව ආයේ ඔහුගේ මෙහෙවර අගයන සෙසු දකුණු ආසියාතික රටවලින්.

මේ ලිපිය ආරම්භයේ මා උපුටා දැක්වූ පලමු උධෘතය මෆූස් අනාම්ගේ. ඊළඟ උධෘතය කනක්ගේ  සොහොයුරු කුන්ඩා ඩික්සිත්ගේ. මෆූස්, කනක් හා කුන්ඩා වැනි කතුවරුන්ට සහයෝගිතාව දැක්වීම නවදිල්ලි සමුළුව පුරාම දැකිය හැකි වුණා.

අවසානයේ මාධ්‍ය ජය ගන්නා තුරු මර්දනයට ලක් වන මාධ්‍ය ආයතන හා මාධ්‍යවේදීන් සමඟ සහයෝගයෙන් සිටීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

[Op-ed] RTI in Sri Lanka: It took 22 years, and journey continues

My op-ed essay on Right to Information (RTI) in Sri Lanka, published in the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) South Asia blogsite (SAMSN Digital Hub) on 14 July 2016:

RTI in Sri Lanka - Nalaka Gunawardene op-ed published in IFJ South Asia blog, 14 July 2016

RTI in Sri Lanka – Nalaka Gunawardene op-ed published in IFJ South Asia blog, 14 July 2016

RTI in Sri Lanka:

It took 22 years, and journey continues

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s Parliament debated the Right to Information (RTI) bill for two days (23 – 24 June 2016) before adopting it into law. No member opposed it, although some amendments were done during the debate.

If that sounds like an easy passage, it was preceded by over two decades of advocacy with various false starts and setbacks. A large number of Lankans and a few supportive foreigners share the credit for Sri Lanka becoming the 108th country in the world to have its own RTI (or freedom of information) law.

How we reached this point is a case study of campaigning for policy change and law reform in a developing country with an imperfect democracy. The journey deserves greater documentation and analysis, but here I want to look at the key strategies, promoters and enablers.

The story began with the change of government in Parliamentary elections of August 1994. The newly elected People’s Alliance (PA) government formulated a media policy that included a commitment to people’s right to know.

But the first clear articulation of RTI came in May 1996, from an expert committee appointed by the media minister to advise on reforming laws affecting media freedom and freedom of expression. The committee, headed by eminent lawyer R K W Goonesekere (and thus known as the Goonesekere Committee) recommended many reforms – including a constitutional guarantee of RTI.

Sadly, that government soon lost its zeal for reforms, but some ideas in that report caught on. Chief among them was RTI, which soon attracted the advocacy of some journalists, academics and lawyers. And even a few progressive politicians.

Different players approached the RTI advocacy challenge in their own ways — there was no single campaign or coordinated action. Some spread the idea through media and civil society networks, inspiring the ‘demand side’ of RTI. Others lobbied legislators and helped draft laws — hoping to trigger the ‘supply side’. A few public intellectuals helpfully cheered from the sidelines.

Typical policy development in Sri Lanka is neither consultative nor transparent. In such a setting, all that RTI promoters could do was to keep raising it at every available opportunity, so it slowly gathered momentum.

For example, the Colombo Declaration on Media Freedom and Social Responsibility – issued by the country’s leading media organisations in 1998 – made a clear and strong case for RTI. It said, “The Official Secrets Act which defines official secrets vaguely and broadly should be repealed and a Freedom of Information Act be enacted where disclosure of information will be the norm and secrecy the exception.”

That almost happened in 2002-3, when a collaboratively drafted RTI law received Cabinet approval. But an expedient President dissolved Parliament prematurely, and the pro-RTI government did not win the ensuing election.

RTI had no chance whatsoever during the authoritarian rule of Mahinda Rajapaksa from 2005 to 2014. Separate attempts to introduce RTI laws by a Minister of Justice and an opposition Parliamentarian (now Speaker of Parliament) were shot down. If anyone wanted information, the former President once told newspaper editors, they could just ask him…

His unexpected election defeat in January 2015 finally paved the way for RTI, which was an election pledge of the common opposition. Four months later, the new government added RTI to the Constitution’s fundamental rights. The new RTI Act now creates a mechanism for citizens to exercise that right.

Meanwhile, there is a convergence of related ideas like open government (Sri Lanka became first South Asian country to join Open Government Partnership in 2015) and open data – the proactive disclosure of public data in digital formats.

These new advocacy fronts can learn from how a few dozen public spirited individuals kept the RTI flames alive, sometimes through bleak periods. Some pioneers did not live to see their aspiration become reality.

Our RTI challenges are far from over. We now face the daunting task of implementing the new law. RTI calls for a complete reorientation of government. Proper implementation requires political will, administrative support and sufficient funds. We also need vigilance by civil society and the media to guard against the whole process becoming mired in too much red tape.

RTI is a continuing journey. We have just passed a key milestone.

Science writer and columnist Nalaka Gunawardene has long chronicled Sri Lanka’s information society and media development issues. He tweets at @NalakaG.

 

Media Sector Reforms in Sri Lanka: Some ‘Big Picture’ Level Thoughts

නොගැලපෙන  රෝද - четыре колеса сказка

නොගැලපෙන රෝද – четыре колеса сказка

I’m a story teller at heart. I sometimes moonlight as a media researcher or commentator but have no pretensions of being academic. I always try to make my points as interesting as possible — using analogies, metaphors, examples, etc.

This is the approach I used when asked to talk to the working group on Sri Lanka Media Reforms, convened by the Media Ministry, Sri Lanka Press Institute, International Media Support (IMS) and the University of Colombo.

I used a well-loved Russian children’s story that was known in Sinhala translation as නොගැලපෙන රෝද — the story of one vehicle with different sized wheels, and how animal friends tried to make it move and when it proved impossible, how they put each wheel to a unique use…

A framework for media reform in Sri Lanka...by Nalaka Gunawardene

A framework for media reform in Sri Lanka…by Nalaka Gunawardene

A framework for media reform in Sri Lanka...by Nalaka Gunawardene

A framework for media reform in Sri Lanka…by Nalaka Gunawardene

Well, in the case of media reforms, we can’t go off in different directions. We must make the vehicle work, somehow.

Full presentation here: http://www.slideshare.net/NalakaG/media-reforms-in-lanka-big-picture-ideas-by-nalaka-gunawardene

Echelon Feb 2015: ‘People Power’ Beyond Elections

Illustration by Echelon magazine, http://www.echelon.lk

Illustration by Echelon magazine, http://www.echelon.lk

Text of my column written for Echelon monthly business magazine, Sri Lanka, Feb 2015 issue. Published online at: http://www.echelon.lk/home/people-power-beyond-elections/

‘People Power’ Beyond Elections

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s democratic credentials were put to test once again during the Presidential Election on 8 January 2015.

An impressive 81.52% of registered voters turned up, and their majority choice changed the regime. A well-oiled system that has been holding elections since 1931 proved its efficacy again. And if its integrity came under threat, the formidable Commissioner of Elections stood up for the due process.

As we pat ourselves on the back, however, let us remember: an election is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for a vibrant democracy. There is much more to democracy than holding free and fair elections.

The ‘sufficient conditions’ include having public institutions that allow citizens the chance to participate in political process on an on-going basis; a guarantee that all people are equal before the law (independent and apolitical judiciary); respect for cultural, ethnic and religious diversity; and freedom of opinion without fearing any repercussions. Sri Lanka has much work to do on all these fronts.

Democracy itself, as practised for centuries, can do with some ‘upgrading’ to catch up with modern information societies.

Historically, people have responded to bad governance by changing governments at elections, or by occasionally overthrowing corrupt or despotic regimes through mass agitation.

Yet such ‘people power’ has its own limits: in country after country where one political party – or the entire political system — was replaced with another through popular vote (or revolt), people have been disappointed at how quickly the new brooms lose their bristles.

The solution must, therefore, lie in not just participating in elections (or revolutions), but in constantly engaging governments and keeping the pressure on them to govern well.

In practice, we citizens must juggle it along with our personal and professional lives. As information society advances, however, new tools and methods are becoming available to make it easier.

Social Accountability

This relatively new approach involves citizens gathering data, systematically analysing it and then engaging (or confronting, when necessary) elected and other officials in government. Citizens across the developing world are using information to improve the use of common property resources (e.g. water, state land and electromagnetic spectrum, etc.), and management of funds collected through taxation or borrowed from international sources.

Such engagement enables citizens as well as civil society organisations (CSOs) to engage with policymakers and citizen service providers. Some call it social accountability (or SAcc), and others refer to it as participatory democracy. Whatever the label, the idea is to ensure greater accountability in how the public sector manages public funds and responds to citizens’ needs.

For this to work, citizens need to access public sector information – about budgets, expenditures, problems and performance. Over 100 countries now have laws guaranteeing people’s right to information (RTI). Sadly, Sri Lanka is lagging behind all other SAARC countries, five of which have already enacted RTI laws and two (Afghanistan and Bhutan) have draft bills under consideration. Attempts to introduce RTI in Sri Lanka were repeatedly thwarted by the previous government.

Economist Hernando de Soto (image from Wikipedia)

Economist Hernando de Soto (image from Wikipedia)

An early champion of social accountability was the Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto who has been researching on poverty, development and governance issues. He says: “Supposedly in a democracy, if the majority of people are poor, then they set the criteria of what is right. Yet all those mechanisms that allow [society] to decide where the money goes — and that it is appropriately allocated — are not in place throughout the Third World.”

The result? “We take turns electing authoritarian governments. The country, therefore, is left to the [whims] of big-time interests, and whoever funded the elections or parties. We have no right of review or oversight. We have no way for the people’s voice to be heard — except for eight hours on election day!”

It is this important right of review and oversight in between elections that SAcc promotes. Call it an ‘insurance’ against democracy being subverted by big money, corrupt officials or special interest groups…

A dozen years ago, concerned by development investments being undermined by pervasive corruption and excessive bureaucracy, the World Bank started advocating SAcc. Their research shows how, even in the most hopeless situations, ordinary people often come together to collect their voice and exert pressure on governments to be responsive.

“Social accountability is about affirming and operationalising direct accountability relationships between citizens and the state. It refers to the broad range of actions and mechanisms beyond voting that citizens can use to hold the state to account,” says a World Bank sourcebook on the subject. (See: http://go.worldbank.org/Y0UDF953D0)

What does that mean in plain language? Seeking to go beyond theory and jargon, the Bank funded a global documentary in 2003, which I co-produced. Titled ‘Earth Report: People Power’ and first broadcast on BBC in February 2004, it featured four inspiring SAcc examples drawn from Brazil, India, Ireland and Malawi (online: http://goo.gl/xQnr9v).

These case studies, among the best at the time, showed how SAcc concepts could be adapted in different societies and economic systems

 

  • In Porto Alegre, Brazil, community members participate annually in a series of meetings to decide on the City Budget. This material is presented to Parliament which finds it difficult to refuse the recommendations — because over 20,000 have contribute to its preparation. As many or more watch how the budget is spent.

 

  • In Rajasthan, India, an advocacy group named MKSS holds a public meeting where the affidavits of local candidates standing for the state elections are available to the people. This ‘right to information’ extends all the way down to villages where people can find out about public spending.

 

  • In Ireland, the government has partnered with trade unions, employers, training institutions and community groups on a strategy to deal with problems affecting youth (such as school drop-outs and high unemployment). Citizens set priorities for social spending.

 

  • In Malawi, villagers participate in assessing local health clinics by scoring various elements of the service. A Health Village Committee then meets the service providers who also assess themselves. Together, they work out ways to improve the service.

During the last decade, many more examples have emerged – some driven by public intellectuals, others by civil society groups or socially responsible companies. Their issues, challenges and responses vary but everyone is looking for practical ways to sustain civic engagement in between elections.

The development community has long held romanticized views on grassroots empowerment. While SAcc builds on that, it is no castle in the air: the rise of digital technologies, web and social media allows better monitoring, analysis and dissemination. And government monopolies over public information have been breached — not just by progressive policies and RTI laws but also by efforts such as WikiLeaks.

Confronted by the growing flood of often technical information, citizens need to be well organised and skilled to use in the public interest. Evidence-based advocacy is harder than rhetorical protests.

Dr Bela Bhatia, then an associate fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in India, says on the film: “Ultimately the responsibility in a democracy is ours…and if today we have corrupt politicians, it is because we have allowed corruption to happen, to take root.”

Rather than debating endlessly on how things became so bad, SAcc promoters show a way forward – with emphasis on collaboration, not confrontation.

“It’s up to the governments to make up their mind whether they want to respect the more participatory model or invite more confrontation, to invite violence and perhaps ultimately the dismantling of the very democratic system,” says Bhatia.

How can we deepen our democracy with SAcc? Start with RTI, and see what happens.