[Op-ed] RTI in Sri Lanka: It took 22 years, and journey continues

My op-ed essay on Right to Information (RTI) in Sri Lanka, published in the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) South Asia blogsite (SAMSN Digital Hub) on 14 July 2016:

RTI in Sri Lanka - Nalaka Gunawardene op-ed published in IFJ South Asia blog, 14 July 2016

RTI in Sri Lanka – Nalaka Gunawardene op-ed published in IFJ South Asia blog, 14 July 2016

RTI in Sri Lanka:

It took 22 years, and journey continues

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s Parliament debated the Right to Information (RTI) bill for two days (23 – 24 June 2016) before adopting it into law. No member opposed it, although some amendments were done during the debate.

If that sounds like an easy passage, it was preceded by over two decades of advocacy with various false starts and setbacks. A large number of Lankans and a few supportive foreigners share the credit for Sri Lanka becoming the 108th country in the world to have its own RTI (or freedom of information) law.

How we reached this point is a case study of campaigning for policy change and law reform in a developing country with an imperfect democracy. The journey deserves greater documentation and analysis, but here I want to look at the key strategies, promoters and enablers.

The story began with the change of government in Parliamentary elections of August 1994. The newly elected People’s Alliance (PA) government formulated a media policy that included a commitment to people’s right to know.

But the first clear articulation of RTI came in May 1996, from an expert committee appointed by the media minister to advise on reforming laws affecting media freedom and freedom of expression. The committee, headed by eminent lawyer R K W Goonesekere (and thus known as the Goonesekere Committee) recommended many reforms – including a constitutional guarantee of RTI.

Sadly, that government soon lost its zeal for reforms, but some ideas in that report caught on. Chief among them was RTI, which soon attracted the advocacy of some journalists, academics and lawyers. And even a few progressive politicians.

Different players approached the RTI advocacy challenge in their own ways — there was no single campaign or coordinated action. Some spread the idea through media and civil society networks, inspiring the ‘demand side’ of RTI. Others lobbied legislators and helped draft laws — hoping to trigger the ‘supply side’. A few public intellectuals helpfully cheered from the sidelines.

Typical policy development in Sri Lanka is neither consultative nor transparent. In such a setting, all that RTI promoters could do was to keep raising it at every available opportunity, so it slowly gathered momentum.

For example, the Colombo Declaration on Media Freedom and Social Responsibility – issued by the country’s leading media organisations in 1998 – made a clear and strong case for RTI. It said, “The Official Secrets Act which defines official secrets vaguely and broadly should be repealed and a Freedom of Information Act be enacted where disclosure of information will be the norm and secrecy the exception.”

That almost happened in 2002-3, when a collaboratively drafted RTI law received Cabinet approval. But an expedient President dissolved Parliament prematurely, and the pro-RTI government did not win the ensuing election.

RTI had no chance whatsoever during the authoritarian rule of Mahinda Rajapaksa from 2005 to 2014. Separate attempts to introduce RTI laws by a Minister of Justice and an opposition Parliamentarian (now Speaker of Parliament) were shot down. If anyone wanted information, the former President once told newspaper editors, they could just ask him…

His unexpected election defeat in January 2015 finally paved the way for RTI, which was an election pledge of the common opposition. Four months later, the new government added RTI to the Constitution’s fundamental rights. The new RTI Act now creates a mechanism for citizens to exercise that right.

Meanwhile, there is a convergence of related ideas like open government (Sri Lanka became first South Asian country to join Open Government Partnership in 2015) and open data – the proactive disclosure of public data in digital formats.

These new advocacy fronts can learn from how a few dozen public spirited individuals kept the RTI flames alive, sometimes through bleak periods. Some pioneers did not live to see their aspiration become reality.

Our RTI challenges are far from over. We now face the daunting task of implementing the new law. RTI calls for a complete reorientation of government. Proper implementation requires political will, administrative support and sufficient funds. We also need vigilance by civil society and the media to guard against the whole process becoming mired in too much red tape.

RTI is a continuing journey. We have just passed a key milestone.

Science writer and columnist Nalaka Gunawardene has long chronicled Sri Lanka’s information society and media development issues. He tweets at @NalakaG.

 

Advertisements

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #263: ගරු සරු නැති විවෘත සංවාද අවකාශයක් අවශ්‍ය ඇයි?

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) & Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe at Nelum Yaya Blog awards for 2015, held on 26 March 2016

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) & Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe at Nelum Yaya Blog awards for 2015, held on 26 March 2016

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 3 April 2016), I probe why the blogosphere and other social media platforms are vital for public discourse in the Lankan context.

Sri Lanka’s mainstream media does not serve as an adequate platform for wide-ranging public discussion and debate. Besides being divided along ethnic and political lines, the media is also burdened by self-imposed restrictions where most don’t critique certain social institutions. Among the top-ranked ‘sacred cows’ are the armed forces and clergy (especially Buddhist clergy).

No such “no-go areas” for bloggers, tweeps and Facebookers. New media platforms have provided a space where irreverence can thrive: a healthy democracy badly needs such expression. I base this column partly on my remarks at the second Nelum Yaya Blog Awards ceremony held on 26 March 2016.

I also refer to a landmark ruling in March 2015, where the Supreme Court of India struck down a “draconian” law that allowed police to arrest people for comments on social media networks and other websites.

India’s apex court ruled that Section 66A of the Information Technology Act was unconstitutional in its entirety, and the definition of offences under the provision was “open-ended and undefined”.

The provision carried a punishment of up to three years in jail. Since its adoption in 2008, several people have been arrested for their comments on Facebook or Twitter. The law was challenged in a public interest litigation case by a law student after two young women were arrested in November 2012 in Mumbai for comments on Facebook following the death of a politician.

Speaker Karu Janasuriya presents Lifetime Award to Nalaka Gunawardene at Nelum Yaya Blog Awards on 26 March 2016 - Photo by Pasan B Weerasinghe

Speaker Karu Janasuriya presents Lifetime Award to Nalaka Gunawardene at Nelum Yaya Blog Awards on 26 March 2016 – Photo by Pasan B Weerasinghe

මගේ මාධ්‍ය ගුරුවරයා වූ ශ‍්‍රීමත් ආතර් සී. ක්ලාක් නිතර දුන් ඔවදනක් වූයේ  ඕනෑම කාලීන ප‍්‍රශ්නයක හෝ සංවාදයක සමීප දසුන මෙන්ම දුර රූපය හෙවත් සුවිසල් චිත‍්‍රය (Bigger Picture) ද විමසා බලන්න කියායි.

බොහෝ එදිනෙදා අරගල හා මත ගැටුම්වලට පසුබිම් වන ඓතිහාසික සාධක හා දිගුකාලීන ප‍්‍රවාහයන් තිබෙනවා. ඒවා හඳුනා ගැනීම හරහා වත්මන් සිදුවීම් වඩාත් හොඳින් අවබෝධ කර ගත හැකියි.

අපේ සමාජයේ ගතාතනුගතිකත්වය හා නූතනත්වය අතරත්, වැඩවසම් අධිපතිවාදය හා සමානාත්මතාව අතරත් නොනවතින අරගලයක් පවතිනවා.

මෙය හුදෙක් දේශපාලනමය හෝ පන්ති අතර ගැටුමක් පමණක් නොවෙයි. අධ්‍යාපන ක‍්‍රමය, වෘත්තීන් මෙන්ම ජන මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය ආදී බොහෝ තැන්හිදී එය විවිධාකාරයෙන් අපට හමු වනවා.

ඓතිහාසිකව වරප‍්‍රසාද භුක්ති විඳින සමාජ පිරිස් සෙසු අය නැගී එනවාට කැමති නැහැ. උදාහරණයකට 1931දී බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය පාලකයන් අපට සර්වජන ඡන්ද බලය ප‍්‍රදානය කිරීමට සැරසෙන විට අපේ සමහර ප‍්‍රභූන් හා උගතුන් එයට එරෙහි වුණා. තමන්ගේ ඡන්දය නිසි ලෙස භාවිත කිරීමට නොතේරෙන අයට එම බලය දීම අවදානම් සහගත බවට තර්ක කෙරුණා.

එහි යටි අරුත වූයේ ලක් ඉතිහාසයේ කිසිම දිනෙක සාමාන්‍ය ජනයාට කිසිදු අයිතියක් හෝ වරප‍්‍රසාදයක් හෝ නොතිබීමයි.

නූගතුන්ට හා දුප්පතුන්ට ආණ්ඩු තේරීමේ බලයක් නොදිය යුතුය යන්න එදා යටත් විජිත ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ පමණක් නොව වත්මන් තායිලන්තයේ ද ප‍්‍රභූන් තවමත් මතු කරන තර්කයක්. (සරසවි අධ්‍යාපනයක් නොලද හෝ ආදායම් බදු ගෙවීමට තරම් නොඋපයන අයගේ ඡන්ද බලය අහිමි කළ යුතු යයි තායි ප්‍රභූ පිරිසක් යෝජනා කොට තිබෙනවා.)

එහෙත් ලිබරල් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයට සංකල්පීය ලෙස කැප වී සිටි බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය පාලකයෝ අපේ ප‍්‍රභූ විරෝධතා මැද සර්වජන ඡන්ද බලය අපට දායාද කළා. යම් අඩුපාඩු සහිතව වුවත් වසර 85ක් තිස්සේ මැතිවරණ දුසිම් ගණනකදී අපේ ජනයා මේ බලය භාවිත කර තිබෙනවාග

මව්පියන්ගෙන් පාසල් ගාස්තු අය නොකර, මහජනයාගෙන් එකතු වන බදු මුදල් යොදවා අධ්‍යාපන ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය නඩත්තු කිරීමේ සංකල්පය 1940 දශකයේ යෝජනා වූ විට ද සමහර ප‍්‍රභූන්ගේ ප‍්‍රතිරෝධයක් මතුව ආවා. (නිදහස් අධ්‍යාපනය ලෙස වැරදියට හඳුන් වන්නේ මේ ක‍්‍රමයයි.)

එහිදී ද යටි අරුත වුයේ වරප‍්‍රසාද භුක්ති විඳිමින් සිටි සංඛ්‍යාත්මක සුළුතරය, අධ්‍යාපනය හරහා සාමාන්‍ය ජනයාගේ දු දරුවන් සමාජයේ උසස් යයි පිළිගත් වෘත්තීන්ට හා තනතුරුවලට පිවිසීම දැකීමට නොකැමැති වීමයි.

පසුගිය සියවසේ මේ තීරණාත්මක අවස්ථා දෙකෙහිදීම මෙරට සමහර පුවත්පත් (එවකට තිබූ ප‍්‍රබලම මාධ්‍යය) පොදු ජනයා වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටියා. සර්වජන ඡන්දයේත්, මුදල් අය නොකරන අධ්‍යාපනයේත් දිගු කාලීන සමාජ වටිනාකම තර්කානුකූලව පෙන්වා දීමට ප‍්‍රගතිශීලී පුවත්පත් කතුවරුන් පෙරට ආවා. (ඒ අතර ප‍්‍රතිගාමී බලවේග වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටි පුවත්පත්ද තිබුණා.)

කන්නන්ගරයන්ගේ අධ්‍යාපන ප‍්‍රතිසංස්කරණවලට එරෙහිව නැගී ආ ප‍්‍රතිරෝධයට ප‍්‍රතිචාර දැක්වීමට ආචාර්ය ඊ. ඩබ්ලිව්. අදිකාරම්, ආචාර්ය ගුණපාල මලලසේකර හා ආනන්ද මීවනපලාන තිදෙනා ආරක්ෂක වළල්ලක් මෙන් ක‍්‍රියා කළ සැටි ලේඛනගතව තිබෙනවා. පොදු උන්නතිය සඳහා වැදගත් තීරණ හා පියවර වෙනුවෙන් ජනමතය ගොඩ නැංවීමට මාධ්‍ය සමහරකගේ සහයෝගය ඔවුන් ලබා ගත්තා.

එදාට වඩා මාධ්‍ය ආයතන බහුල වී ඇති, තාක්ෂණය ඉදිරියට ගොස් තිබෙන අද තත්ත්වය කුමක්ද? ඇන්ටනාවකින් නොමිලයේ හසු කර ගත හැකි ටෙලිවිෂන් සේවාවන් 20කට වැඩි ගණනක්, FM නාලිකා 50ක් පමණ හා භාෂා තුනෙන්ම විවිධාකාරයේ පුවත්පත් දුසිම් ගණනක් අද මෙරට තිබෙනවා.

එහෙත් පොදු උන්නතියට ඍජුවම අදාළ වන අවස්ථා හා සංවාදවලදී මේ මාධ්‍ය බහුතරයක් සිටින්නේ කොතැනක ද යන්න සීරුවෙන් විමසා බැලිය යුතුයි.

මගේ දිගු කාලීන නිරීක්ෂණය නම් වැඩවසම්, ගතානුගතික හා අධිපතිවාදී වුවමනාකම්/මතවාදයන් සඳහා අපේ මාධ්‍ය එළිපිටම පෙනී සිටීම ප‍්‍රබල වී ඇති බවයි.

මෙයට හේතුව මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය අධික ලෙස දේශපාලනකරණය ලක් වීම යයි යමෙකුට තර්ක කළ හැකියි. ඔව්, එයත් එක් හේතුවක්. එහෙත් මීට පරම්පරාවකට හෝ දෙකකට හෝ පෙර තිබූ මාධ්‍ය වෘත්තීය බව හා සමාජ කැප වීම ටිකෙන් ටික හීන වී යාමට මාධ්‍ය කර්මාන්තය තුළ අභ්‍යන්තර පිරිහීම ද දායක වී තිබෙනවා. මේ තත්ත්වය රාජ්‍ය මෙන්ම පෞද්ගලික හිමිකාරිත්වයෙන් යුතු මාධ්‍යවල දැකිය හැකියි.

වසර ගණනක් පුරා පැවති මාධ්‍ය මර්දනය හමුවේ සමහර මාධ්‍ය ආයතන හා මාධ්‍ය තීරකයන් (කතුවරුන්, කළමනාකරුවන්) හීලෑ වී ඇති බවක් පෙනෙනවා.

එසේම බහුතරයක් මාධ්‍ය අනවශ්‍ය පුජනීයත්වයකින් සලකන, එනිසාම හේතු සහගත විවේචනයකට හෝ බියවන ප්‍රසිද්ධ චරිත හා පොදු ආයතන සංඛ්‍යාව වෙන කවරදාටත් වඩා වැඩි වී තිබෙනවා.

මේ බොල් පිළිම වන්දනාවේ යන ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා වෙනුවෙන් හෝ පොදු උන්නතිය සඳහා හෝ පෙනී සිටීම කාලයක්, අවශ්‍යතාවක් නැහැ. මෙය ඛේදජනක යථාර්ථයක්.

කුලියාපිටියේ පාසල් දරුවා HIV ආසාදිත යැයි කියා කොන් කරනු ලැබූ විට අපේ බොහෝ බහුතරයක් මාධ්‍ය කළේ එය තලූ මරමින් වාර්තා කිරීම පමණයි. අඩු තරමින් ඒ දරුවාගේ හා මවගේ පෞද්ගලිකත්වයටවත් ගරු කෙරුණේ නැහැ. දරුවාට දුරින් පිහිටි විකල්ප පාසලක් සොයා දීමේ යෝජනාව මතු වී ඉදිරියට ගියේ ෆේස්බුක් සමාජ මාධ්‍යය හරහායි.

මහනුවර දළදා මාලිගය ඉදිරිපිටින් දිවෙන මාර්ගය වසර ගණනාවක් පුරා වාහන ධාවනයට ඉඩ නොදී වසා තිබීම නිසා ඇති වන අධික වාත දුෂණය හා අති මහත් ජනතා අපහසුතාව ගැන බොහෝ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ (සිංහල) මාධ්‍ය ඇති තරම් කතා නොකළේ ඇයි? අස්ගිරි විහාරය එය යළිත් විවෘත කිරීමට අහේතුකව විරුද්ධ වීම නිසාද?

නාමධාරී ටික දෙනෙකුගේ අත්තනෝමතික විරෝධය නිසා මේ ගැන විග‍්‍රහ කැරෙන විද්‍යාත්මක ලිපි පවා පළ කිරීමට සමහර පුවත්පත් පැකිලෙනවා. එම පසුබිම තුළ විවෘත සංවාද වෙබ්ගත වී තිබෙනවා. නැතිනම් සාපේක්ෂව වැඩි පරාසයක මත ගැටුමට ඉඩ දෙන ඉංග‍්‍රීසි පුවත්පත්වලට සීමා වී තිබෙනවා.

අපේ ඉංග‍්‍රීසි පුවත්පත් වුවද සමහර මාතෘකා ගැන විවෘත මත දැක්වීමට බියයි. මාධ්‍ය වාරණයක් හෝ මාධ්‍යවලට මැර බලය පෑමක් නැති අද දවසේත් සමහර කතුවරුන් මහ දවල් බියට පත් වන, අහම්බෙන්වත් විවේචනය නොකරන සමාජ ආයතන තිබෙනවා. හමුදාව හා සංඝ සමාජය ඒ අතර ප‍්‍රධානයි. විශ්වවිද්‍යාල ගැනත් බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය තුළ ඇත්තේ බය පක්ෂපාතීකම පෙරදැරි කර ගත් ආකල්පයක්.

මේ හැම ආයතනයකම හොඳ මෙන්ම නරකද සාක්ෂි සහිතව දැකීම හා මැදහත්ව විග‍්‍රහ කිරීම අපට මාධ්‍යවලින් බලාපොරොත්තු වන්නට බැහැ. තමන්ගේ සරසවි ඇදුරන් මාධ්‍ය හරහා අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස පිම්බීම මාධ්‍යකරුවන් අතර බහුල පුරුද්දක්.

වුවමනාවට වඩා බය පක්ෂපාතී වූ, අධිපතිවාදයන්ට නතු වූ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යයට යම් තරමකට හෝ විකල්ප අවකාශයක් මතු වන්නේ වෙබ් හරහා ලියැවෙන බ්ලොග් රචනා හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනය තුළින්. මෙය සමාජයීය හිදැසකට හෙවත් රික්තයකට මතුව ආ සාමූහික ප‍්‍රතිචාරයක් ලෙසද දැකිය හැකියි.

මාර්තු 26 වනදා දෙවන වරටත් පවත්වන ලද නෙළුම් යාය සිංහල බ්ලොග් සම්මාන උළෙලේදී මේ ගැන මා අදහස් දැක්වීමක් කළා. එහිදී මා කීවේ බ්ලොග් අවකාශය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වන ‘ගරු සරු නැති ගතිය’ (irreverence) දිගටම පවත්වා ගත යුතු බවයි.

මේ ගතිය අධිපතිවාදී තලයන්හි සිටින අයට, නැතිනම් ජීවිත කාලයක් පුරා අධිපතිවාදය ප‍්‍රශ්න කිරීමකින් තොරව පිළි ගෙන සිටින ගතානුගතිකයන්ට නොරිස්සීම අපට තේරුම් ගත හැකියි.

ඔවුන් මැසිවිලි නගන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නිසා සාරධර්ම බිඳ වැටන කියමින්. ඇත්තටම එහි යටි අරුත නම් පූජනීය චරිත ලෙස වැඳ ගෙන සිටින අයට/ආයතනවලට අභියෝග කැරෙන විට දෙවොලේ කපුවන් වී සිටින ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන්ට දවල් තරු පෙනීමයි!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පාලනය කරන්න යැයි ඔවුන් කෑගසන්නේ දේවාලේ ව්‍යාපාරවලට තර්ජනයක් මතු වීම හරහා කලබල වීමෙන්.

මෙයින් මා කියන්නේ  ඕනෑම දෙයක් කීමට හෝ ලිවීමට ඉඩ දිය යුතුය යන්න නොවෙයි. එහෙත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය ඉතා සීරුවෙන් කළ යුත්තක් බවයි. නැතහොත් සමාජයක් ලෙස දැනට ඉතිරිව තිබෙන විවෘත සංවාද කිරීමට ඇති අවසාන වේදිකාවත් අධිපතිවාදයට හා සංස්කෘතික පොලිසියට නතු වීමේ අවදානම තිබෙනවා.

අපටත් වඩා ගතානුගතික වූ ඉන්දියානු සමාජය පුරවැසි අයිතීන් වෙනුවෙන් නව තාක්ෂණය හා නූතනත්වය යොදා ගන්නා සැටි අධ්‍යයනය කිරීම වැදගත්.

Image courtesy The Hindustan Times

Image courtesy The Hindustan Times

2015 මාර්තුවේ ඉන්දියානු ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය වැදගත් තීන්දුවක් ප‍්‍රකාශයට පත් කළා. එනම් 2008දී පනවන ලද එරට තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණ පනතේ 66A වගන්තිය ව්‍යවස්ථා විරෝධී බවයි. එම වගන්තිය යටතේ ක‍්‍රියා කරමින් ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල විකල්ප මත පළ කළ ඉන්දියානුවන් කිහිප දෙනකු එරට පොලිසිය විසින් අත්අඩංගුවට ගෙන තිබුණා. මේ ගැන කම්පාවට පත් නීති ශිෂ්‍යාවක් මෙයට එරෙහිව එරට ඉහළම උසාවියට පෙත්සමක් ඉදිරිපත් කළා.

BBC Online: 24 March 2016

Section 66A: India court strikes down ‘Facebook’ arrest law

‘ඕනෑම සමාජයක භාෂණ නිදහස පැවතිය යුතු අතර එයට කරන සීමා කිරීම් අතිශයින් යුක්ති සහගත විය යුතුයි. තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණ පනතේ 66A වගන්තිය මේ සීමා ඉක්මවා ගිය, පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රකාශන අයිතිය අනිසි ලෙස කොටු කරන්නක්’ ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණ තීන්දුවේ සඳහන් වූවා.

තව දුරටත් තීන්දුව මෙසේද කීවා. ‘ඕනෑම කරුණක් ගැන සාකච්ඡා කරන්නත් (discussion), යම් ක‍්‍රියාමාර්ගයක් වෙනුවෙන් එයට පක්ෂව මත පළ කරන්නත් (advocacy) පුරවැසියන්ට නිදහස තිබෙනවා. එම මත දැක්වීම් කෙතරම් ජනප‍්‍රිය ද නැද්ද යන්න එහිදී අදාළ නැහැ. මත දැක්වීම ඉක්මවා යම් සමාජ විරෝධී උසිගැන්වීමක්  (incitement) සිදු වේ නම් පමණක් නීතිය හා සාමයට තර්ජනයක් කියා එය පාලනය කළ හැකියි. වෙබ් හරහා පළ කරන අදහස් සමහරුන්ට දිරවා ගත නොහැකි වූ පමණටවත්, අතිශයින් ආන්දෝලනාත්මක වූ පමණටවත් එයට මැදිහත් වීමට පොලිසියට හෝ රජයට හෝ ඉඩක් නොතිබිය යුතුයි.

The Hindu, 26 March 2016: The judgment that silenced Section 66A

මේ ඉතා වැදගත් තීන්දුව ගැන අදහස් දැක්වූ ප‍්‍රකට ඉන්දියානු නීති ක‍්‍රියාකාරකයකු වන ලෝරන්ස් ලියැං (Lawrence Liang) කිවේ මෙයයි. ‘ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී සමාජයක විවේචනය කිරීමට හා විසමුම්තියට  ඕනෑම අයකුට නිදහස තිබිය යුතු බව ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය නැවත වරක් පිළිගෙන තියෙනවා. යම් මත දැක්වීමක් නිසා සමහරුන්ගේ මාන්නයට හෝ අධිපතිවාදයට පහර වැදුණු පමණට එය කිසිසේත්ම නීති විරෝධී වන්නේ නැහැ!’

Free speech Ver.2.0, by Lawrence Liang. The Hindu. 25 March 2015

21 වන සියවසේ ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ගැන විමර්ශනය කරන විට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා කරන තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවට හා මත දැක්වීම්වලට අනිවාර්යයෙන්ම ඉඩ සහතික කළ යුතු බව ඔහු කියනවා. ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට පමණක් සුවිශේෂී වන අයිතියක් නොවෙයි.

‘භාෂණ හා ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ගැන ඉන්දියාවේ අලූත් ආකාරයේ සංවාදයන් බිහි වන සැටි මා දකිනවා. 66A වගන්තිය ඉවත් කිරීමට පෙළ ගැසුණේ නීතිඥයන්, බ්ලොග් රචකයන්, සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන්නන්. සන්නිවේදනය නම් වූ පරිසර පද්ධතිය තුළ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට අමතරව දැන් වෙබ්ගත සන්නිවේදකයන් ද හරි හරියට සක‍්‍රීයව සිටිනවා. මේ නිසා රජයන්ට හා අධිපතිවාදීන්ට හිතුමතයට ක‍්‍රියා කළ නොහැකියි.’ ලියැං තවදුරටත් කියනවා.

ළිංමැඬියාවෙන් පෙළෙන අපේ සමාජයට කවදා හෝ ළිඳෙන් ගොඩ යන්නට අත්වැලක් සපයන්නේ අධිපතිවාදය හෙළා දකින නූතනත්වය පමණයි!

Posted in Arthur C Clarke, Blogging, Citizen journalism, citizen media, community media, Democracy, digital media, Digital Natives, good governance, ICT, India, Information Society, Innovation, Internet, Journalism, Media activism, Media freedom, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, South Asia, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Writing, youth. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »

Corridors of Power Panel: Tapping our ‘Hybrid Media Reality’ to secure democracy in Sri Lanka

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera. Photo by Manisha Aryal

I just spoke on a panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy” which was part of the public exhibition in Colombo called Corridors of power: Drawing and modelling Sri Lanka’s tryst with democracy.

Media panel promo

The premise for our panel was as follows:

The architecture of the mainstream media, and increasingly, social media (even though distinct divisions between the two are increasingly blurred) to varying degrees reflects or contests the timbre of governance and the nature of government.

How can ‘acts of journalism’ by citizens revitalise democracy and how can journalism itself be revived to engage more fully with its central role as watchdog?

In a global contest around editorial independence stymied by economic interests within media institutions, how can Sri Lanka’s media best ensure it attracts, trains and importantly, retains a calibre of journalists who are able to take on the excesses of power, including the silencing of inconvenient truths by large corporations?

The panel, moderated by lawyer and political scientist Asoka Obeyesekere comprised freelance journalist Amantha Perera, Sunday Observer editor Lakshman Gunasekera, and myself.

Here are my opening remarks (including some remarks made during Q&A).

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power - Photo by Manisha Aryal

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power – Photo by Manisha Aryal

Panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy”

20 Sep 2015, Colombo

Remarks by Nalaka Gunawardene

Curator Sanjana has asked us to reflect on a key question: What is the role of media in securing democracy against its enemies, within the media itself and beyond?

I would argue that we are in the midst of multiple, overlapping deficits:

  • Democracy Deficit, a legacy of the past decade in particular, which is now recognised and being addressed (but we have a long way to go)
  • Public Trust Deficit in politicians and public institutions – not as widely recognised, but is just as pervasive and should be worrying us all.
  • Media Deficit, probably the least recognised deficit of all. This has nothing to do with media’s penetration or outreach. Rather, it concerns how our established (or mainstream) MEDIA FALLS SHORT IN PERFORMING the responsibilities of watchdog, public platform and the responsibility to “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable”.

In this context, can new media – citizens leveraging the web, mobile devices and the social media platforms – bridge this deficit?

My answer is both: YES and NO!

YES because new media opportunities can be seized – and are being seized — by our citizens to enhance a whole range of public interest purposes, including:

  • Political participation
  • Advocacy and activism
  • Transparency and accountability in public institutions
  • Peace-building and reconciliation
  • Monitoring and critiquing corporate conduct

All these trends are set to grow and involve more and more citizens in the coming years. Right now, one in four Lankans uses the web, mostly thru mobile devices.

BUT CAN IT REPLACE THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA?

NO, not in the near term. For now, these counter-media efforts are not sufficient by themselves to bridge the three deficits I have listed above. The mainstream media’s products have far more outreach and and the institutions, far more resources.

Also, the rise of citizen-driven new media does NOT – and should NOT — allow mainstream media to abdicate its social responsibilities.

This is why we urgently need MEDIA SECTOR REFORMS in Sri Lanka – to enhance editorial independence AND professionalism.

The debate is no longer about who is better – Mainstream media (MSM) or citizen driven civic media.

WE NEED BOTH.

So let us accept and celebrate our increasingly HYBRID MEDIA REALITY (‘hybrid’ seems to be currently popular!). This involves, among other things:

  • MSM drawing on Civic Media content; and
  • Civic Media spreading MSM content even as they critique MSM

To me, what really matters are the ACTS OF JOURNALISM – whether they are RANDOM acts or DELIBERATE acts of journalism.

Let me end by drawing on my own experience. Trained and experienced in mainstream print and broadcast media, I took to web-based social media 8 years ago when I started blogging (for fun). I started tweeting five years ago, and am about to cross 5,000 followers.

It’s been an interesting journey – and nowhere near finished yet.

Everyday now, I have many and varied CONVERSATIONS with some of my nearly 5,000 followers on Twitter. Here are some of the public interest topics we have discussed during this month:

  • Rational demarcation of Ministry subject areas (a lost cause now)
  • Implications of XXL Cabinet of the National/Consensus Govt
  • Questionable role of our Attorney General in certain prosecutions
  • Report on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) Session
  • Is Death Penalty the right response to rise of brutal murders?
  • Can our media be more restrained and balanced in covering sexual crimes involving minors?
  • How to cope with Hate Speech on ethnic or religious grounds
  • What kind of Smart Cities or MegaCity do we really need?
  • How to hold CocaCola LK responsible for polluting Kelani waters?

Yes, many of these are fleeting and incomplete conversations. So what?

And also, there’s a lot of noise in social media: it’s what I call the Global Cacophony.

BUT these conversations and cross-talk often enrich my own understanding — and hopefully help other participants too.

Self-promotional as this might sound, how many Newspaper Editors in Sri Lanka can claim to have as many public conversations as I am having using social media?

Let me end with the closing para in a chapter on social media and governance I recently wrote for Transparency International’s Sri Lanka Governance Report 2014 (currently in print):

“Although there have been serious levels of malgovernance in Sri Lanka in recent years, the build up on social media platforms to the Presidential Election 2015 showed that Lankan citizens have sufficient maturity to use ICTs and other forms of social mobilisation for a more peaceful call for regime change. Channelling this civic energy into governance reform is the next challenge.”

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa