Avoiding ‘Cyber Nanny State’: Challenges of Social Media Regulation in Sri Lanka

Keynote speech delivered by science writer and digital media analyst Nalaka Gunawardene at the Sri Lanka National IT Conference held in Colombo from 2 to 4 October 2018.

Nalaka Gunawardene speaking at National IT Conference 2018 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Photo by ReadMe.lk

Here is a summary of what I covered (PPT embedded below):

With around a third of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people using at least one type of social media, the phenomenon is no longer limited to cities or English speakers. But as social media users increase and diversify, so do various excesses and abuses on these platforms: hate speech, fake news, identity theft, cyber bullying/harassment, and privacy violations among them.

Public discourse in Sri Lanka has been focused heavily on social media abuses by a relatively small number of users. In a balanced stock taking of the overall phenomenon, the multitude of substantial benefits should also be counted.  Social media has allowed ordinary Lankans to share information, collaborate around common goals, pursue entrepreneurship and mobilise communities in times of elections or disasters. In a country where the mainstream media has been captured by political and business interests, social media remains the ‘last frontier’ for citizens to discuss issues of public interest. The economic, educational, cultural benefits of social media for the Lankan society have not been scientifically quantified as yet but they are significant – and keep growing by the year.

Whether or not Sri Lanka needs to regulate social media, and if so in what manner, requires the widest possible public debate involving all stakeholders. The executive branch of government and the defence establishment should NOT be deciding unilaterally on this – as was done in March 2018, when Facebook and Instagram were blocked for 8 days and WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (to text only) owing to concerns that a few individuals had used these services to instigate violence against Muslims in the Eastern and Central Provinces.

In this talk, I caution that social media regulation in the name of curbing excesses could easily be extended to crack down on political criticism and minority views that do not conform to majority orthodoxy.  An increasingly insular and unpopular government – now in its last 18 months of its 5-year term – probably fears citizen expressions on social media.

Yet the current Lankan government’s democratic claims and credentials will be tested in how they respond to social media challenges: will that be done in ways that are entirely consistent with the country’s obligations under international human rights laws that have safeguards for the right to Freedom of Expression (FOE)? This is the crucial question.

Already, calls for social media regulation (in unspecified ways) are being made by certain religious groups as well as the military. At a recent closed-door symposium convened by the Lankan defence ministry’s think tank, the military was reported to have said “Misinformation directed at the military is a national security concern” and urged: “Regulation is needed on misinformation in the public domain.”

How will the usually opaque and unpredictable public policy making process in Sri Lanka respond to such partisan and strident advocacy? Might the democratic, societal and economic benefits of social media be sacrificed for political expediency and claims of national security?

To keep overbearing state regulation at bay, social media users and global platforms can step up arrangements for self-regulation, i.e. where the community of users and the platform administrators work together to monitor, determine and remove content that violates pre-agreed norms or standards. However, the presentation acknowledges that this approach is fraught with practical difficulties given the hundreds of languages involved and the tens of millions of new content items being published every day.

What is to be done to balance the competing interests within a democratic framework?

I quote the views of David Kaye, the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression from his June 2018 report to the UN Human Rights Council about online content regulation. He cautioned against the criminalising of online criticism of governments, religion or other public institutions. He also expressed concerns about some recent national laws making global social media companies responsible, at the risk of steep financial penalties, to assess what is illegal online, without the kind of public accountability that such decisions require (e.g. judicial oversight).

Kaye recommends that States ensure an enabling environment for online freedom of expression and that companies apply human rights standards at all  stages of their operations. Human rights law gives companies the tools to articulate their positions in ways that respect democratic norms and

counter authoritarian demands. At a minimum, he says, global SM companies and States should pursue radically improved transparency, from rule-making to enforcement of  the rules, to ensure user autonomy as individuals increasingly exercise fundamental rights online.

We can shape the new cyber frontier to be safer and more inclusive. But a safer web experience would lose its meaning if the heavy hand of government tries to make it a sanitized, lame or sycophantic environment. Sri Lanka has suffered for decades from having a nanny state, and in the twenty first century it does not need to evolve into a cyber nanny state.

Advertisements

Debating Social Media Block in Sri Lanka: Talk show on TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Aluth Parlimenthuwa live talk show on Social Media Blocking in Sri Lanka – TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Sri Lanka’s first ever social media blocking lasted from 7 to 15 March 2018. During that time, Facebook and Instagram were completely blocked while chat apps WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (no images, audio or video, but text allowed).

On 7 March 2018, the country’s telecom regulator, Telecommunications Regulatory Commission (TRCSL), ordered all telecom operators to impose this blocking across the country for three days, Reuters reported. This was “to prevent the spread of communal violence”, the news agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying. In the end, the blocking lasted 8 days.

For a short while during this period, Internet access was stopped entirely to Kandy district “after discovering rioters were using online messaging services like WhatsApp to coordinate attacks on Muslim properties”.

Both actions are unprecedented. In the 23 years Sri Lanka has had commercial Internet services, it has never imposed complete network shutdowns (although during the last phase of the civil war between 2005 and 2009, the government periodically shut down telephone services in the Northern and Eastern Provinces). Nor has any social media or messaging platforms been blocked before.

I protested this course of action from the very outset. Restricting public communications networks is ill-advised at any time — and especially bad during an emergency when people are frantically seeking reliable situation updates and/or sharing information about the safety of loved ones.

Blocking selected websites or platforms is a self-defeating exercise in any case, since those who are more digitally savvy – many hate peddlers among them –can and will use proxy servers to get around. It is the average web user who will be deprived of news, views and updates.

While the blocking was on, I gave many media interviews to local and international media. I urged the government “to Police the streets, not the web!”.

At the same time, I acknowledged and explained how a few political and religious extremist groups have systematically ‘weaponised’ social media in Sri Lanka during recent years. These groups have been peddling racially charged hate speech online and offline. A law to deal with hate speech has been in the country’s law books for over a decade. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) Act No 56 of 2007 prohibits the advocacy of ‘religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence’. This law, fully compliant with international human rights standards, has not been enforced.

On 14 March 2018, I took part in the ‘Aluth Parlimenthuwa’ TV talk show of TV Derana on this topic, where I articulated the above and related views. The other panelists were Deputy Minister Karu Paranawithana, presidential advisor Shiral Lakthilaka, Bar Association of Sri Lanka chairman U R de Silva, and media commentator Mohan Samaranayake.

Part 1:

Part 2:

 

Comment: ආපදා කළමණාකරනය හරියට කරන්න නම් නිසි ආණ්ඩුකරණයක් ඕනැ

I have written about disaster early warnings on many occasions  during the past decade (see 2014 example). I have likened it to running a relay race. In a relay, several runners have to carry the baton and the last runner needs to complete the course. Likewise, in disaster early warnings, several entities – ranging from scientific to administrative ones – need to be involved and the message needs to be identified, clarified and disseminated fast.

Good communications form the life blood of this kind of ‘relay’. Warnings require rapid evaluation of disaster situation, quick decision making upon assessing the risks involved, followed by rapid dissemination of the decision made. Disaster warning is both a science and an art: those involved have to work with imperfect information, many variables and yet use their best judgement. Mistakes can and do happen at times, leading to occasional false alarms.

In the aftermath of the heavy monsoonal rains in late May 2017, southern Sri Lanka experienced the worst floods in 14 years. The floods and landslides affected 15 districts (out of 25), killed at least 208 and left a further 78 people missing. As of 3 June 2017, some 698,289 people were affected, 2,093 houses completely destroyed, and 11,056 houses were partially damaged.

Did the Department of Meteorology and Disaster Management Centre (DMC) fail to give adequate warnings of the impending hydro-meteorological hazard? There has been much public discussion about this. Lankadeepa daily newspaper asked me for a comment, which they published in their issue of 7 June 2017.

I was asked to focus on the use of ICTs in delivering disaster early warnings.

Infographic courtesy Sunday Observer, 4 June 2017

නව මාධ්‍ය සහ නව තාක්ෂණය යොදා ගෙන ආපදාවලට පෙර සාර්ථක අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් ක්‍රියාත්මක වීම ගැන ලෝකයේ උදාහරණ මොනවාද?

ආපදාවලින් සමස්ත සමාජය හැකි තරම් ප්‍රවේශම් කර ගැනීමට කරන ක්‍රමීය සැළසුම්කරණයට, ආපදා අවදානම් අවම කිරීම (disaster risk reduction) යයි කියනවා. එහි වැදගත් කොටසක් තමයි ආපදා අනතුරු ඇඟවීම්.

සොබාවික උවදුරු (hazards) මානව සමාජයන්ට හානි කරන විට එයට ආපදා (disasters) යයි කියනවා. ආපදාවකට පෙර, ආපදාව දිග හැරෙන විට ආ ඉන් පසුව ටික කලක් යන තුරු යන තුන් අදියරේදීම ප්‍රශස්ත සන්නිවේදනවලට මාහැඟි මෙහෙවරක් ඉටු කළ හැකියි.

ආපදා අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් (disaster early warnings) යනු මහජනයාගේ ආරක්ෂාව සැළසීමට රජයකට තිබෙන වගකීම් සමුදායෙන් ඉතා වැදගත් එකක්. රටක  ජාතික ආරක්ෂාව සළසනවාට සමාන්තර වැදගත්කමක් මා එහි දකිනවා.

අනතුරු ඇඟවීම හරිහැටි කිරීමට, බහුවිධ උවදුරු ගැන විද්‍යාත්මකව නිතිපතා දත්ත එකතු කිරීම, ඒවා ඉක්මනින් විශ්ලේෂණය කිරීම හා ඒ මත පදනම් වී තීරණ ගැනීම අයත් වනවා.

මෙරට විවිධ ආපදා පිළිබඳව අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් කිරීමේ වගකීම නොයෙක් රාජ්‍ය ආයතනවලට නිල වශයෙන් පවරා තිබෙනවා. සුනාමි හා කුණාටු ගැන නිල වගකීම ඇත්තේ කාලගුණ විද්‍යා දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවට.

යම් ආපදාවක් ළඟ එන බව සෑහෙන දුරට තහවුරු කර ගත් පසු, එයින් බලපෑමට ලක් වන ප්‍රජාවන් සියල්ලට එය හැකි ඉක්මනින් දැනුම් දී, අවශ්‍ය නම් ඉවත් වීමට නිර්දේශ කළ යුතුයි. මෙකී භාරදූර කාරය කළ හැක්කේ රජයට පමණයි. ස්වේච්ඡා ආයතනවලට එය ප්‍රතිරාවය කරන්න පුළුවන්. ඒත් මුල් තීරණ අදාල රාජ්‍ය ආයතනයක් විසින්ම ගත යුතුයි.

අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් බෙදා හරින විට මේ මූලික සාධක කිහිපයක් සළකා බැලිය යුතුයි.

අනතුරක සේයාව පහළ වූ විට මූලික දැනුම්දීමක් (alert) හා එය වඩාත් තහවුරු වූ විට අනතුරු ඇඟවීමක් (warning) කළ යුතුයි.

ඉවත්වීමේ තීරණය (evacuation) සාවධානව ගත යුත්තක්. ඉවත්ව යන මාර්ග හා එක් රැස් විය යුතු තැන් ගැන කල් තබා ප්‍රජාව දැනුවත් කර තිබිය යුතුයි. මේ සඳහා කලින් කලට ආපදා පෙරහුරු (disaster drills) පැවැත්වීම ඉතා ප්‍රයෝජනවත්.

ආපදා පිළිබඳව මූලික දැනුම්දීම් හා අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් කඩිනමිනුත් කාර්යක්ෂමවත් සමාජගත කරන්නට එක් සන්නිවේදන ක්‍රමයක් වෙනුවට එක වර සන්නිවේදන ක්‍රමවේද කීපයක් යොදා ගත යුතුයි. එකකින් මග හැරෙන ජනයා තව ක්‍රමයකින් හෝ ළඟා වීමට. ටෙලිවිෂන්, රේඩියෝ, ජංගම දුරකථන මෙයට යොදා ගත හැකියි.

අමෙරිකාව හා ජපානය වැනි රටවල සියලු රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් සේවාවන්වල එදිනෙදා විකාශයන් මදකට බාධා කොට, ඒවා හරහා රජයේ නිසි බලධරයන් විසින් එකවර ආපදා අනතුරු ඇඟවීම් විකාශ කිරීමේ තාක්ෂණමය හා පරිපාලනමය සූදානම තිබෙනවා.

මීට අමතරව cell broadcasting නම් තාක්ෂණයක් මෑතදී දියුණු කොට තිබෙනවා. එයින් ජංගම දුරකථන ජාලයක් හරහා නිශ්චිත ප්‍රදේශවල සිටින ජංගම ග්‍රාහකයන් පමණක් ඉලක්ක කොට ආපදාවක් ගැන SMS කෙටි පනිවුඩ ඉක්මනින් යැවිය හැකියි. හදිසි අවස්ථාවල ජංගම දුරකථන ජාලයට දරා ගන්න බැරි තරම් සන්නිවේදන වැඩි වූ විටෙක (network overload) පවා මේ ක්‍රමයට යවන පණිවුඩ අවසාන ඉලක්කයට යනවා. හැබැයි ඒවා ලබන ජංගම දුරකථනවල බැටරි බලය තිබිය යුතුයි.

මේ cell broadcasting ක්‍රමවේදය මෙරටට අදාල කරන සැටි ගැන ලර්න් ඒෂියා පර්යේෂනායතනය පර්යේෂන කොට තිබෙනවා.

4G දක්වා නූතන දුරකථන තාක්ෂණය යොදා ගැනෙන, මිලියන් 25කට වඩා සක්‍රිය ජංගම දුරකථන ගිනුම් තිබෙන අපේ රටේ මේ තාක්ෂණය ආපදා අවස්ථාවල මීට වඩා උපක්‍රමශීලී ලෙස යොදා ගත යුතුමයි.

අපේ රටේ තිබෙන්නේ නවීන තාක්ෂණය නැතිකමක් නොවේ. තිබෙන නවීන තාක්ෂණයන් කාර්යක්ෂමව හා නිසි පරිදි මෙහෙයවා වැඩ ගැනීමට පරිපාලනමය සූදානම හා තීරණ ගැනීමේ ධාරිතාව මදි වීමයි. මේවා ආණ්ඩුකරණය දුර්වලවීමේ ලක්ෂණ ලෙසයි මා දකින්නේ. ආපදා කළමණාකරනය හරියට කරන්න නම් නිසි ආණ්ඩුකරණයක් තිබීම තීරණාත්මකයි.

නාලක ගුණවර්ධන, විද්‍යා ලේඛක හා මාධ්‍ය පර්යේෂක

Sri Lanka State of the Media Report’s Tamil version released in Jaffna

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Journalists, academics, politicians and civil society representatives joined the launch of Tamil language version of Sri Lanka’s Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report in Jaffna on 24 January 2017.

The report, titled Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka, contains 101 recommendations for media sector reforms needed at different levels – in government policies, laws and regulations, as well as within the media industry, media profession and media teaching.

The report, for which I served as overall editor, is the outcome of a 14-month-long consultative process that involved media professionals, owners, managers, academics and relevant government officials. It offers a timely analysis, accompanied by policy directions and practical recommendations.

The original report was released on World Press Freedom Day (3 May 2016) at a Colombo meeting attended by the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition and Minister of Mass Media.

The Jaffna launch event was organised by the Department of Media Studies of the University of Jaffna, the Jaffna Press Club and the National Secretariat for Media Reforms (NSMR).

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Reginald Cooray, Governor of the Northern Province, in a message said: “I am sure that the elected leaders and the policy makers of this government of Good governance will seize the opportunity to make a professionally ethical media environment in Sri Lanka which will strengthen the democracy and good governance.”

He added: “The research work should be studied, appreciated and utilised by the leaders and the policy makers. Everyone who was involved in the work should be greatly thanked for their research presentation with clarity.”

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report's Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report’s Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Speaking at the event, Sinnadurai Thavarajah, Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Provincial Council, urged journalists to separate facts from their opinions. “Media freedom is important, but so is unbiased and balanced reporting,” he said.

Lars Bestle, Head of Department for Asia and Latin America at International Media Support (IMS), which co-published the report, said: “Creating a healthy environment for the media that is inclusive of the whole country is an essential part of ensuring democratic transition.”

He added: “This assessment points the way forward. It is now up to the local actors – government, civil society, media, businesses and academia – with support from international community, to implement its recommendations.”

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

I introduced the report’s key findings and recommendations. In doing so, I noted how the government has welcomed those recommendations applicable to state policies, laws and regulations and already embarked on law review and regulatory reforms. In sharp contrast, there has been no reaction whatsoever from the media owners and media gatekeepers (editors).

Quote from 'Rebuilding Public Trust' - State of Sri Lanka's media report

Quote from ‘Rebuilding Public Trust’ – State of Sri Lanka’s media report

Dr S Raguram, Head of Media Studies at the University of Jaffna (who edited the Tamil version) and Jaffna Press Club president Ratnam Thayaparan also spoke.

The report comes out at a time when the country’s media industry and profession face multiple crises stemming from an overbearing state, unpredictable market forces and rapid technological advancements.

Balancing the public interest and commercial viability is one of the media sector’s biggest challenges today. The report says: “As the existing business models no longer generate sufficient income, some media have turned to peddling gossip and excessive sensationalism in the place of quality journalism. At another level, most journalists and other media workers are paid low wages which leaves them open to coercion and manipulation by persons of authority or power with an interest in swaying media coverage.”

Notwithstanding these negative trends, the report notes that there still are editors and journalists who produce professional content in the public interest while also abiding by media ethics. Unfortunately, their work is eclipsed by media content that is politically partisan and/or ethnically divisive.

The result: public trust in media has been eroded, and younger Lankans are increasingly turning to entirely web-based media products and social media platforms for information and self-expression. A major overhaul of media’s professional standards and ethics is needed to reverse these trends.

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

The Tamil report is available for free download at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-media-assessment-sri-lanka-tamil-language-version/

The English original report is at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-assessment-media-industry-profession-sri-lanka/

Read my July 2010 op-ed: [Op-ed] Major Reforms Needed to Rebuild Public Trust in Sri Lanka’s Media

[Echelon column] Balancing Broadband and Narrow Minds

This column originally appeared in Echelon business magazine, March 2014 issue. It is being republished here (without change) as part of a process to archive all my recent writing in one place – on this blog.

Image courtesy Echelon magazine

Image courtesy Echelon magazine

Balancing Broadband and Narrow Minds

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Are we cyber-stunted?

I posed this question some weeks ago at Sri Lanka Innovation Summit 2013 organised by Echelon and News 1st. We were talking about how to harness the web’s potential for spurring innovation.

We cannot innovate much as a society when our broadband is stymied by narrow minds. How many among the (at least) 3.5 million Lankans who regularly access the web have the right mindset for making the best use of the medium, I asked.

We didn’t get to discuss it much there, but this bothers me. Sri Lanka has now had 19 years of commercial Internet connectivity (the first ISP, Lanka Internet Services, started in April 1995). That’s a long time online: we have gone past toddler years and childhood (remember dial-up, anyone?) and been through turbulent ‘teen years’ as well.

Technology and regulation have moved on, imperfect though the latter maybe. But psychologically, as a nation we have yet to find our comfort level with the not-so-new medium.

There are various indicators for this. Consider, for example, the widespread societal apprehensions about social media, frequent web-bashing by editorialists in the mainstream media, and the apparent lack of public trust in e-commerce services. These and other trends are worth further study by social scientists and anthropologists.

Another barometer of cyber maturity is how we engage each other online, i.e. the tone of comments and interactions. This phenomenon is increasingly common on news and commentary websites; it forms the very basis of social media.

Agree to disagree?

‘Facts are sacred, comment is free’ is a cherished tenet in journalism and public debates. But expressing unfashionable opinions or questioning the status quo in Lankan cyber discussions can attract unpleasant reactions. Agreeing to disagree rarely seems an option.

Over the years, I have had my share of online engagement – some rewarding, others neutral and a few decidedly depressing. These have come mostly at the multi-author opinion platforms where I contribute, but sometimes also through my own blogs and twitterfeed.

One trend seems clear. In many discussions, the ‘singer’ is probed more than the ‘song’. I have been called unkind names, my credentials and patriotism questioned, my publishers’ bona fides doubted, and my (usually moderate) positions attributed to personality disorders or genetic defects! There have been a few threats too (“You just wait – we’ll deal with traitors soon!”).

I know those who comment on mainstream political issues receive far more invective. Most of this is done under the cover of anonymity or pseudonymity. These useful web facilities – which protect those criticising the state or other powerful interests – are widely abused in Lankan cyberspace to malign individuals expressing uncommon views.

There are some practical reasons, too, why our readers may misunderstand what we write, or take offence needlessly.

Poor English comprehension must account for a good share of web arguments. Many fail to grasp (or appreciate) subtlety, intentional rhetoric and certain metaphors. Increasingly, readers react to a few key words or phrases in longer piece — without absorbing its totality.

A recent example is my reflective essay ‘Who Really Killed Mel Gunasekera?’. I wrote it in early February shortly after a highly respected journalist friend was murdered in her suburban home by a burglar.

I argued that we were all responsible, collectively, for this and other rising incidents of violence. I saw it as the residual product of Lankan society’s brutalisation during war years, made worse by economic marginalisation. Rather than barricading ourselves and living in constant fear, we should tackle the root causes of this decay, I urged.

The plea resonated well beyond Mel’s many friends and admirers. But some readers were more than miffed. They (wrongly) reduced my 1,100 words to a mere comparison of crime statistics among nations.

I aim to write clearly, and also probe beyond headlines and statistics. But is such nuance a lost art when many online readers merely scan or speed-read what we labour on? In today’s fast-tracked world, can reflective writing draw discerning readers and thoughtful engagement any longer? I wonder.

Too serious

Then there is the humour factor – or the lack of it. Many among us don’t get textual satire, as Groundviews.org discovered with its sub-brand called Banyan News Reporters (BNR). Their mock news items and spoofs were frequently taken literally – and roundly condemned.

The web is a noisy place, but some stand out in that cacophony because of their one-tracked minds. They are those who perceive and react to everything through a pet topic or peeve. That ‘lens’ may be girls vs boys, or lions vs tigers, or capitalism vs socialism or something else. No matter what the topic, such people will always sing same old tune!

Tribal divisions are among the most entrenched positions, and questioning matters of faith assures a backlash. It seems impossible to discuss secularism in Sri Lanka without seemingly offending all competing brands of salvation! (The last time I tried, they were bickering among themselves long after I quietly left the platform…)

Oh sure, everybody is entitled to a bee or two in her bonnet. But what to do with those harbouring an entire bee colony — which they unleash at the slightest provocation?

I just let them be (well, most of the time). I used to get affected by online abuse from cloaked detractors but have learnt to take it with equanimity. This is what economist and public intellectual W A Wijewardena also recommends.

“You must treat commentators as your own teachers; some make even the most stupid comment in the eyes of an intelligent person, but that comment teaches us more than anything else,” he wrote in a recent Facebook discussion.

He added: “Individual wisdom and opinions are varied and one cannot expect the same type of intervention by all. I always respect even the most damaging comment made by some on what I have written!”

Moderating extreme comments is a thankless and challenging job for those operating opinion platforms. If they are too strict or cautious, they risk diluting worthwhile public debates for which space is shrinking in the mainstream media. At the same time, hate speech peddlers cannot be allowed free license in the name of free speech.

Where to draw the line? Each publisher must evolve own guidelines.

Groundviews.org, whose vision is to “enable civil, progressive and inclusive discussions on democracy, rights, governance and peace in Sri Lanka” encourages “a collegial, non-insulting tone” in all contributors. It also reminds readers that “comments containing hate speech, obscenity and personal attacks will not be approved.”

Colombo Telegraph, another popular opinion and reporting website, “offers a right to reply for any individual or organisation who feels they have been misreported”. Sadly, this courtesy is not available in many online news and commentary websites carrying Lankan content.

In the end, even the most discerning publishers and editors can do only so much. As more Lankans get online and cyber chatter increases, we have to evolve more tolerant and pluralistic ways of engagement.

An example of cyber intolerance and name-calling: one of many...

An example of cyber intolerance and name-calling from December 2014, during the campaign for Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election (when Bollywood’s Salman Khan was brought to Sri Lanka to promote then incumbent Mahinda Rajapalksa’s election campaign)

 

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #276: අසාර්ථක වූ තුර්කි කුමන්ත්‍රණයෙන් මතු වන නවීන සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 24 July 2016), I discuss the role of new communications technologies and social media during the coup d’état that was attempted in Turkey against the government on the night of on 15 July 2016.

The attempt was carried out by a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves under a council called the Peace at Home Council. Reasons for its failure have been widely discussed.

Citizen resistance to Turkey coup on 16 July 2016 - wire service photos

Citizen resistance to Turkey coup on 16 July 2016 – wire service photos

As Zeynep Tufekci, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science, described in a New York Times op-ed on 20 July 2016: “In the confusing hours after the coup attempt began, the country had heard from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan — and even learned that he was alive — when he called a television station via FaceTime, an easy-to-use video chat app. As the camera focused on the iPhone in the anchor’s hand, the president called on the people of Turkey to take to the streets and guard the airports. But this couldn’t happen by itself. People would need WhatsApp, Twitter and other tools on their phones to mobilize. The president also tweeted out the call to his more than eight million followers to resist the coup.”

She added: “The journalist Erhan Celik later tweeted that the public’s response had deterred potential coup supporters, especially within the military, from taking a side…Meanwhile, the immediacy of the president’s on-air appeal via FaceTime was an impetus for people to take to the streets. The video link protected the government from charges that it was using fraud or doctoring — both common in the Turkish news media — to assure the public that the president was safe. A phone call would not have worked the same way.”

I discuss the irony of a leader like Erdogan, who has been cracking down on independent media practitioners and social media users, had to rely on these very outlets in his crucial hour of need.

I echo the views of Zeynep Tufekci for not just Turkey but other countries where autocratic rulers are trying to censor the web and control the media: “The role of internet and press freedoms in defeating the coup presents a significant opportunity. Rather than further polarization and painting of all dissent as illegitimate, the government should embrace real reforms and reverse its censorship policies.”

See also: How the Internet Saved Turkey’s Internet-Hating President

Photo from The Daily Beast

Photo from The Daily Beast

කුමන හෝ හේතුවක් නිසා රටක දේශපාලන බලය බලහත්කාරයෙන් අත්කර ගැනීමට එරට හමුදාවට නීතිමය හෝ සදාචාරාත්මක අයිතියක් නැහැ.

එහෙත් විටින් විට ලෝකයේ විවිධ රටවල හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණ සිදුවනවා. දකුණු ආසියානු කලාපයේ බංග්ලාදේශය හා පාකිස්ථානය මේ අමිහිරි අත්දැකීම් රැසක් ලබා තිබෙනවා.

යුරෝපය හා ආසියාව හමු වන තැන පිහිටි තුර්කියේ මීට දින කීපයකට පෙර අසාර්ථක වූ හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණයට මා අවධානය යොමු කළේ නවීන සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් එහි වැදගත් භූමිකාවක් ඉටු කළ නිසායි.

නව මාධ්‍යයන් හරහා කුමන්ත්‍රණයට එරෙහිව මහජනයා පෙළ ගැස්වීමට එරට නායකයා සමත් වුණා. විශාල අවි හා සෙබල බල පරාක්‍රමයක් සතු හමුදාවක් ජන බලය හා සන්නිවේදන හැකියාව හරහා ආපසු බැරැක්කවලට යැවීමට හැකි වීම විමසා බැලිය යුතු සංසිද්ධියක්.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය මාස ගණනක් සිට සූක්ෂ්ම ලෙසින් සැලසුම් කරන ලද බව හෙළි වී තිබෙනවා. රටට සාමය සඳහා සභාව (Peace at Home Council) ලෙසින් සංවිධානය වූ තුර්කි හමුදාවේ කොටසක් තමයි මේ උත්සාහයේ යෙදුණේ.

එහි අක්මුල් තවමත් හරිහැටි පැහැදිලි නැහැ. එහෙත් 2016 ජූලි 15-16 දෙදින තුළ ඔවුන් රටේ බලය අල්ලා ගන්නට ප්‍රචණ්ඩව තැත් කළා.

තුර්කි ජනාධිපති රෙචෙප් ටයිප් අර්ඩොගන් (Recep Tayyip Erdoğan) කෙටි නිවාඩුවකට අගනුවරින් බැහැරව, මර්මාරිස් නම් පිටිසර නිවාඩු නිකේතනයේ සිිටියා. ජූලි 15-16 මධ්‍යම රාත්‍රියට ආසන්නව යුද්ධ ටැංකි එරට අගනුවර අන්කාරා, විශාලතම නගරය වන ඉස්තාන්බුල් හා තවත් ප්‍රධාන නගරවලට ඇතුළු වුණා. ප්‍රහාරක ගුවන් යානා පහළින් පියාසර කළා.

තම බලය පෙන්වීමට හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවෝ කිහිප පොළක ප්‍රහාර දියත් කළා. රටේ පාර්ලිමේන්තු මන්දිරයට හා ජනාධිපති මැදුරට හානි සිදු කෙරුණා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන්ගේ එක් ඉලක්කයක් වූයේ ජනාධිපතිවරයා අත්අඩංගුවට ගැනීම හෝ මරා දැමීමයි. එහෙත් කුමන්ත්‍රණය ගැන දැන ගත් වහාම ඔහුගේ ආරක්ෂක පිරිස ඔහු නැවතී සිටි නිවාඩු නිකේතනයෙන් රහසිගත තැනකට ගෙන ගියා.

මැදියම් රැය පසු වූ විගස රාජ්‍ය රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් (TRT) ආයතනයට ඇතුලු වූ හමුදා පිරිසක්, එහි සිටි නිවේදකයන්ට ප්‍රකාශයක් කියවන මෙන් බලකර සිටියා. ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය හා නිර්ආගමික පාලනය රටේ යළි ස්ථාපිත කිරීමට හමුදාව බලය පවරා ගන්නා බව එහි සඳහන් වුණා. තාවකාලිකව මාෂල් නීතිය ක්‍රියාත්මක කරන බවත්, නව ව්‍යවස්ථාවක් ළඟදීම හඳුන්වා දෙන බවත් හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවෝ රටට ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

The Turkish president spoke to local television with his office unwilling to confirm his location, simply saying he is safe

The Turkish president spoke to local television with his office unwilling to confirm his location, simply saying he is safe

පාන්දර 3.10 වනවිට තමන් රටේ සමස්ත පාලන බලය සියතට ගෙන ඇති බව කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් ලොවට කීවත් එය එසේ වූයේ නැහැ. ජනාධිපති අර්ඩොගන් හා අගමැති බිනාලි යිල්දිරිම් (Binali Yıldırım) ඒ තීරණාත්මක අලුයම පැය කිහිපයේ තීක්ෂණ ලෙසින් සිය ප්‍රතිරෝධය දියත් කළා.

හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් දේශපාලනික හා සම්ප්‍රදායික රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය මර්මස්ථාන මුලින් ඉලක්ක කළ නමුත් නව සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් හා නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන අවධානයක් යොමු කළේ නැහැ. පළපුරුදු හා සටකපට දේශපාලකයකු වන තුර්කි ජනාධිපතිවරයා මේ දුර්වලතාව සැනෙකින් වටහා ගත්තා.

තුර්කිය විශාල රටක්. ලෝක බැංකු දත්තවලට අනුව එරට මිලියන 80කට ආසන්න ජනගහනයෙන් බාගයකට වඩා (58%) ඉන්ටනෙට් භාවිත කරනවා. මෙයින් බහුතරයක් ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හිමිකරුවන්. 2015 අග වනවිට එරට ජංගම දුරකථන සක්‍රීය ගිණුම් මිලියන 73ක් තිබුණා.

හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණය ගැන දැන ගත් වහාම ජනාධිපතිවරයා තමාට හිතවත් හමුදා ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ නිලධාරීන් ගැන තක්සේරු කරන අතරම සන්නිවේදන ජාල හරහා තුර්කි ජනයා වෙත ආයාචනා කිරීමට තීරණය කළා. මේ සඳහා අවශ්‍ය වූ ව්‍යාපාරික සබඳතා හා තාක්ෂණික දැනුම ඔහුගේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය සතුව තිබුණා.

සියල්ල පාන්දර යාමයේ සිදු වුණත් ඉක්මනින් ක්‍රියාත්මක වීමේ වැදගත්කම ජනාධිපතිගේ හිතවත් පිරිස දැන සිටියා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා, ටෙලිකොම් සමාගම් හෝ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල සියතට ගැනීමට මුල් වටයේ කිසිදු උත්සාහයක් ගත්තේ නැහැ. මහජන ඡන්දයෙන් පත්වූ තම රජය රැක ගන්නට වීදි බසින්න යැයි ජනාධිපතිවරයා මේ මාධ්‍ය හරහා යළි යළිත් ඉල්ලා සිටියා.

මුලින්ම රටේ සියලුම ජංගම දුරකථන ග්‍රාහකයන් වෙත කෙටි පණ්වුඩයක් යවමින් ජනපති අර්ඩොගන් කීවේ හැකි සෑම අයුරකින්ම කුමන්ත්‍රණයට විරෝධය දක්වන්න කියායි.

NINTCHDBPICT000252431176

ඒ අනුව ඉස්ලාම් බහුතර (96.5%) එරටෙහි ආගමික ස්ථාන ලවුඩ්ස්පීකර් හරහා විශේෂ යාඥා විසුරු වන්නට පටන් ගත්තා. අවේලාව නොබලා බොහෝ ජනයා වීදි බැස්සා.

ප්‍රධාන නගරවල වීදිවලට පිරුණු ජනයා බහුතරයක් පාලක පක්ෂයේ අනුගාමිකයන් වුවද සියලු දෙනා එසේ වූයේ නැහැ. කොතරම් අඩුපාඩු හා අත්තනෝමතික හැසිරීම් තිබුණද බහුතර ඡන්දයකින් පත් වූ රජයක් පෙරළීමට හමුදාවට කිසිදු වරමක් හෝ අවසරයක් නැතැයි විශ්වාස කළ අයද එහි සිටියා.

තුර්කියේ හමුදාව යනු බලගතු ආයතනයක්ග එම හමුදාව රාජ්‍ය පාලනයට මැදිහත් වීමේ කූප්‍රකට ඉතිහාසයක් තිබෙනවා. 1960 මැයි මාසයේ, 1971 මාර්තුවේ හා 1980 සැප්තැම්බරයේ හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණ සාර්ථක වී මිලිටරි පාලන බිහි වුණා. 1995දී ඡන්දයෙන් පත් වූ හවුල් රජයට 1977දී හමුදාව ‘නිර්දේශ’ ගණනක් ඉදිරිපත් කොට ඒවා පිළි ගන්නට බලපෑම් කළා. මේ මෑත ඉතිහාසය ජනතාවට මතකයිග

තුර්කි රාජ්‍යය නිර්ආගමිකයි (secular state). එහෙත් මෑත කාලයේ ඉස්ලාමීය දේශපාලන පක්ෂ වඩාත් ජනප්‍රිය වීම හරහා රාජ්‍ය පාලනයේ ඉස්ලාමීය නැඹුරුවක් හට ගෙන තිබෙනවා.

හමුදාව මෙයට කැමති නැහැ. ව්‍යවස්ථාවෙන්ම ප්‍රකාශිත පරිදි රාජ්‍යය තව දුරටත්  නිර්ආගමික විය යුතු බවත්, ඉස්ලාම්වාදීන් බලගතු වීම සීමා කළ යුතු බවත් හමුදාවේ මතයයි. මෙය මතවාදී අරගලයකට සීමා නොවී දේශපාලන බල අරගලයකට තුඩු දී තිබෙනවා. 2016 කුමන්ත්‍රණයේ පසුබිම සංකීර්ණ වුවද ආගමික-නිර්ආගමික ගැටුමද එහි එක් වැදගත් සාධකයක්.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් නිවාඩු නිකේතනයට පහර දීමට කලින් එතැනින් පලා ගිය ජනාධිපති අර්ඩොගන්, සැඟවී නොසිට  හිරු උදා වන විට එරට විශාලතම ජාත්‍යන්තර ගුවන් තොටුපළ වන ඉස්තාන්බූල් ගුවන් තොටුපළට සිය නිල ගුවන් යානයෙන් පැමිණියා. මැදියම් රැයේ ටික වේලාවකට කුමන්ත්‍රණකාරීන් අත්පත් කර ගත් ගුවන් තොටුපළ ඒ වන විට යළිත් හිතවත් හමුදා අතට පත්ව තිබුණා.

ගුවන් තොටුපළේ සිට මාධ්‍යවේදියකුගේ ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එකක් හරහා ජනාධිපතිවරයා එරට පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවක් වූ CNN Turkට සජීව ලෙසින් සම්බන්ධ වුණා.

‘ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය රැක ගන්න නගරවල වීදි හා චතුරස්‍රවලට එක් රොක් වන්න. මේ කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් අපට ඉක්මනින් ඉවත් කළ හැකි වේවි. ඔවුන්ට නිසි පිළිතුර දෙන්න ඕනෑ අපේ මහජනතාවයි’ ඔහු ආයාචනා කළා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් නොසිතූ විලසින් මේ පණිවුඩ ඉතා ඉක්මනින් එරට ජනයා අතර පැතිර ගියා. ෆේස්බුක්, ට්විටර් හා අනෙක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල මෙයට මහත් සේ දායක වුණා.

මේ අතර ජනපති කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගනිමින් ජනපතිවරයා ආරක්ෂිත බවත්, ඔහු කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන්ට එරෙහිව කරන අරගලයට ඍජුව නායකත්වය දෙන බවත්, ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට හා විදෙස් රටවලට දැනුම් දුන්නා.

හමුදාව බලය ඇල්ලීමට තැත් කිරීම කෙතරම් තුර්කි වැසියන් කුපිත කළාද කිවහොත් සමහර ස්ථානවල යටත් වූ කුමන්ත්‍රණකාමී හමුදා සෙබලුන් හා නිලධාරීන්ට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා වට කර ගෙන පහර දෙනු ලැබුවා. ඔවුන් ප්‍රසිද්ධ නිග්‍රහවලට ලක් වුණා.

CncnmhQXEAApKN0

යම් අවස්ථාවක කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් CNN Turk පෞද්ගලික නාලිකාව නිහඬ කිරීමට ද තැත් කළා. ඇමරිකානු CNN මාධ්‍ය ජාලය හා තුර්කි සමාගමක් හවුලේ කරන මේ නාලිකාව හමුදා බලපෑම් ප්‍රතික්ෂේප කළා. දිගටම සිය සජීව විකාශයන් කර ගෙන ගියා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය දියත් කොට පැය 24ක් ගතවීමට පෙර රටේ පාලන බලය යළිත් ඡන්දයෙන් පත් වූ රජය යටතට මුළුමනින්ම ගැනීමට ජනපති-අගමැති දෙපළ සමත් වුණා.

ඉන් පසුව කුමන්ත්‍රණයට සම්බන්ධ දහස් ගණනක් හමුදා නිලධාරීන් හා සිවිල් වැසියන් අත්අඩංගුවට ගනු ලැබුවා. මේ අය අධිකරණ ක්‍රියාදාමයකට ලක්වනු ඇති. මේ බොහෝ දෙනකු නොමඟ ගිය හමුදා නිලධාරීන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ හිතවත් පරිපාලන නිලධාරීන් බව පසුව හඳුනාගනු ලැබුවා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය අසාර්ථක වීමට හේතු දේශපාලන විචාරකයෝ තවමත් සමීපව අධ්‍යයනය කරනවා. ඔවුන් පිළිගන්නා එක් දෙයක් තිබෙනවා. 20 වන සියවසේ බොහෝ අවස්ථාවල විවිධ රටවල සාර්ථක වූ බලය ඇල්ලීමේ ආකෘතියක් මෙවර තුර්කියේදී ව්‍යර්ථ වූයේ 21 වන සියවසේ සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් නිසා බවයි.

‘කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් පොතේ හැටියට සියල්ල සැලසුම් කොට ක්‍රියාත්මක වුණා. රාජ්‍ය නායකයා අගනුවරින් බැහැරව සිටි, සිකුරාදා රැයකයි ඔවුන් බලය අල්ලන්න තැත් කළේ. ඒත් ඔවුන්ගේ අවාසියට ඔවුන් භාවිත කළ වට්ටටෝරුව යල් පැන ගිහින්.’ යයි ඉස්තාන්බුල් නුවර පර්යේෂකයකු වන ගැරත් ජෙන්කින්ස් කියනවා.

මේ සමස්ත සිදුවීම් දාමයේ ඉතාම උත්ප්‍රාසජනක පැතිකඩ මෙයයි. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාතික ආරක්ෂාවට තර්ජනයක් යයි කියමින් ඒවා හෙළි දැකීමට හා විටින් විට ඒවා බ්ලොක් කිරීමට පුරුදුව සිටි අර්ඩොගන් ජනපතිවරයාට තීරණාත්මක මොහොතේ ඒවා ඉමහත් ලෙස ප්‍රයෝජනවත් වීමයි.

මේක ඇත්තටම කන්නට ඕනෑ වූ විට කබරගොයාත් තලගොයා වීමේ කතාවක්.

A man stands in front of a Turkish army tank at Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey July 16, 2016. REUTERS/IHLAS News Agency

A man stands in front of a Turkish army tank at Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey July 16, 2016. REUTERS/IHLAS News Agency

2003-2014 කාලයේ තුර්කි අගමැතිව සිටි අර්ඩොගන් 2014දී ජනාධිපතිවරණයට ඉදිරිපත් වී ප්‍රකාශිත ඡන්දවලින් 51.79%ක් ලබමින් ජය ගත්තා. ඔහු තමා වටා විධායක බලය කේන්ද්‍ර කර ගනිමින්, විපක්ෂවලට හිරිහැර කරමින් ඒකාධිපති පාලනයක් ගෙන යන බවට චෝදනා නැගෙනවා. මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට හා පුරවැසියන්ට ප්‍රකාශන නිදහසටත් ඔහුගේ රජයෙන් නිතර බාධා පැමිණෙනවා.

නිල මාධ්‍ය වාරණයක් හා නොනිල මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයක් පවත්වා ගෙන යාම නිසා තුර්කිය ජාත්‍යන්තර ප්‍රජාවේ හා මාධ්‍ය නිදහස පිළිබඳ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයන්ගේ දැඩි දෝෂ දර්ශනයට ලක්ව සිටින රටක්.

තමන්ගේ අධිපතිවාදය ප්‍රශ්න කරන, විකල්ප මතවලට ඉඩ දෙන දෙස් විදෙස් මාධ්‍ය අර්ඩොගන් සලකන්නේ සතුරන් ලෙසයි. එහෙත් රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය පැය කිහිපයකට ඔහුගේ පාලනයෙන් ගිලිහී ගිය විට ඔහුගේ උදව්වට ආවේ ඔහු නිතර දෙස් තබන පෞද්ගලික විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය හා විදෙස් මාධ්‍යයි.

2014දී ඔහු නව නීතියක් හඳුන්වා දුන්නේ ඕනෑම මොහොතක වෙබ් අඩවි බ්ලොක් කිරීමේ බලය රජයට පවරා ගනිමින්.

එසේම අර්ඩොගන් දෙබිඩි පිළිවෙතක් අනුගමනය කරන්නෙක්. සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට නිතර දෙවේලේ බැණ වදින ඔහු තමාගේ ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා. ට්විටර් නිල ගිණුමට මේ වන විට මිලියන 8කට වඩා අනුගාමිකයන් සිටිනවා. කුමන්ත්‍රණය දිග හැරෙන අතර සිය ජනයාට හා ලෝකයට කතා කරන්නට ඔහු ට්විටර් ගිණුමද යොදා ගත්තා.

මේ දෙබිඩි හැසිරීම අපේත් එක්තරා හිටපු පාලකයෙක් සිිහිපත් කරනවා!

කුමන්ත්‍රණයට එරෙහිව අර්ඩොගන් රජයට උපකාර වූ තවත් සාධකයක් පසුව හෙළි වුණා. කුමන්ත්‍රණය ඇරඹී ටික වේලාවකින් එරට ප්‍රධානම ජංගම දුරකථන ජාලය සියලුම ග්‍රාහකයන්ට නොමිලයේ දත්ත සම්ප්‍රේෂණ පහසුකම් ලබා දුන්නා. නූතන දේශපාලන ක්‍රියාකාරකම්වලදී ටෙලිවිෂන් හා රේඩියෝවලට වඩා ටෙලිකොම් සේවාවන් වැදගත් වන බව මේ හරහා අපට පෙනී යනවා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණයේ සන්නිවේදන සාධකය විග්‍රහ කරමින් නිව්යෝර්ක් ටයිම්ස් පත්‍රයට ජූලි 20 වනදා ලිපියක් ලියූ තුර්කි සම්භවය සහිත ඇමරිකානු සරසවි ඇදුරු සෙයිනප් ටුෆෙකි (Zeynep Tufekci) මෙසේ කියනවා.

‘කුමන්ත්‍රණය පරදවන්න ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය හා වෙබ්ගත නව මාධ්‍ය ලබා දුන් දායකත්වය ජනපති අර්ඩොගන් අගය කළ යුතුයි. දැන්වත් මාධ්‍ය වාරණය, මර්දනය හා නවමාධ්‍ය හෙළා දැකීම නතර කොට ප්‍රකාශන නිදහසට ගරු කරන දේශපාලන ප්‍රතිසංස්කරණවලට යොමු විය යුතුයි… ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යයන් හා විවෘත ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සංස්කෘතියක් පැවතීම රටක ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදයට මහත් සවියක් බව මේ අත්දැකීමෙන් අපට හොඳටම පෙනී යනවා.’

How the Internet Saved Turkey’s Internet-Hating President

People stand on a Turkish army tank in Ankara on July 16 - Reuters

People stand on a Turkish army tank in Ankara on July 16 – Reuters

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #274: මාධ්‍ය හිමිකරුවන් හා කතුවරුන් දේශපාලනයට පිවිසි බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය ජනමත විචාරණය

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 10 July 2016), I explore the role played by newspapers in the UK’s referendum on continuing membership in the European Union, held on 23 June 2016.

This column is based on first hand impressions – I spent 10 days in the UK just prior to the referendum, commonly known as the Brexit Vote, meeting journalists, academics and activists.

As the New York Times said in an op-ed article on 20 June 2016, “For decades, British newspapers have offered their readers an endless stream of biased, misleading and downright fallacious stories about Brussels.”

Written by Martin Fletcher, a former foreign and associate editor of The Times of London, the articke added: “British newspapers’ portrayal of the European Union in the lead-up to the referendum on June 23 has likewise been negative. The Financial Times and The Guardian have backed the Remain campaign, but they have relatively small circulations and preach largely to the converted. The Times has been evenhanded, though it finally declared on June 18 that it favored staying in the European Union. But the biggest broadsheet (The Telegraph), the biggest midmarket paper (The Daily Mail) and the biggest tabloid (The Sun) have thrown themselves shamelessly behind Brexit.

“They have peddled the myths that Britain pays 350 million pounds a week (about $500 million) to the European Union; that millions of Turks will invade Britain because Turkey is about to be offered European Union membership; that immigrants are destroying our social services; and that post-Brexit, Britain will enjoy continued access to Europe’s single market without automatically allowing in European Union workers.”

As Fletcher concluded: “It is often said that newspapers no longer matter. But they do matter when the contest is so close and shoppers see headlines like “BeLeave in Britain” emblazoned across the front pages of tabloids whenever they visit their supermarket. They matter if they have collectively and individually misled their readers for decades.”

British newspaper front pages on 23 June 2016, day of the Referendum on EU membership (Brexit Vote)

British newspaper front pages on 23 June 2016, day of the Referendum on EU membership (Brexit Vote)

බහුතරයක් ඡන්දදායකයන්ගේ තේරීමට හිස නැමීම ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදයේ මූලික ලක්ෂණයක්. මැතිවරණයක් හෝ ජනමත විචාරණයක් වෙත යොමු වන පාලක පක්ෂයක් එහි තීරණය පිළිගැනීමට නීතියෙන් මෙන්ම සදාචාරාත්මකවද බැඳී සිටිනවා.

2016 ජුනි 23 වනදා බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයේ පැවැති ජනමත විචාරණය ලෝක අවධානයට යොමු වුණා. එරට යුරෝපා සංගමයේ (European Union, EU) සාමාජිකත්වයේ තව දුරටත් රැඳී සිටිය යුතුද නැත්නම් ඉවත්විය යුතුද යන්න ඡන්දදායකයන්ගෙන් විමසනු ලැබුවා.

ලියාපදිංචි ඡන්දදායකයන්ගෙන් 72.21%ක් ඡන්දය ප්‍රකාශ කළ මෙහි අවසන් ප්‍රතිඵලය වූයේ 51.89%ක් ඉවත්වීමට කැමැත්ත පළ කිරීමෙන්. රැඳී සිටීමට පක්ෂව ලැබුණේ ඡන්ද 48.11%යි. සමස්ත වලංගු ඡන්ද සංඛ්‍යාව 33,551,993ක් වූවා.

මේ ප්‍රතිඵලය එරට රජය, විපක්ෂය හා සමස්ත පාලන තන්ත්‍රයම දේශපාලන අර්බුදයකට පත් කොට තිබෙනවා.

පාලක කොන්සර්වෙටිව් පක්ෂය මෙන්ම ප්‍රධාන විපක්ෂය වන ලේබර් පක්ෂයත් මේ ප්‍රශ්නය හමුවේ දෙකට බෙදුණා. දෙපක්ෂයේම ප්‍රබලයන් පිරිසක් යුරෝපා සංගමයෙන් ඉවත්වීම උදෙසා ප්‍රබලව කැම්පේන් කළා.

කැම්පේන් විවාදයන් අතිශයින් උණුසුම් හා ආවේගශීලී වූයේ ‘පිටස්තරයින්’ බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයේ රැකියා කිරීමට, පදිංචියට හා සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා නොමිලයේ ලැබීමට දහස් ගණනින් පැමිණීම සම්බන්ධයෙන්.

මේ පිටස්තරයන් අතර මැද පෙරදිගින් එන සිරියානුවන් ප්‍රමුඛ සරණාගතයන් සිටියද වැඩිපුරම අවධානය යොමු වූයේ බහුතරයක් වූ සෙසු යුරෝපීයයන්ගේ පැමිණීම ගැනයි.

රාජ්‍යයන් 28ක් සාමාජිකත්වය දරන යුරෝපා සංගමයට සාපේක්ෂව මෑතදී බැඳුණු, ඉසුරුමත් බවින් අඩු (රුමේනියාව, බල්ගේරියාව, ස්ලොවාකියාව, ක්‍රොයේෂියාව, පෝලන්තය වැනි) නැගෙනහිර යුරෝපීය රටවල ජනයාට වීසාවලින් තොරව බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයට පැමිණීමට හා එරට පහසුකම් ලැබීමට හැකියි. රැකියා කිරීමටද හැකියි. (මේ හා සමාන වරප්‍රසාද එම රටවලට යන බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය ජාතිකයකුටද ලැබෙන නමුත් එබඳු රටවලට යන්නට කිසිවකුත් කැමති නැහැ.)

තමන්ගේ රැකියා අවස්ථා රෝහල් හා පාසල් පහසුකම් මේ විජාතිකයන් මහා පරිමාණයෙන් අත්පත් කර ගැනීම ගැන වැඩ කරන පන්තියේ බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය ජනයා අතර කලෙක සිට දැඩි අප්‍රසාදයක් පැවතුණා. මෙය පිටස්තර විරෝධී ආවේගයක් බවට කැම්පේන් කාලය තුළ මතුව ආවා.

මීට අමතරව යුරෝපා සංගමයේ අධික නිලධාරිවාදය ගැන ඔවුන් බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයේ ස්වාධීනත්වය අනිසි බලපෑම් කරනවාද යන්න ගැන මේ ජනමත විචාරණ කාලයේ බහුලව විවාද කරනු ලැබුවා.

Cartoon by Patrick Chappatte, International New York Times

Cartoon by Patrick Chappatte, International New York Times

යුරෝපා සංගමයට බ්‍රිතාන්‍යය බැඳුණේ 1973දි. එවකට යුරෝපීය ආර්ථීක හවුල (European Economic Community, EEC) ලෙස හැඳින්වුණු එහි සාමාජිකත්වයේ දිගටම සිටිය යුතුද යන්න ගැන 1975දි එරට ජනමත විචාරණයක් පැවැත්වුණා.

එවර ඡන්දදායකයන්ගෙන් 67%ක් රැඳී සිටීමට පක්ෂව ඡන්දය ප්‍රකාශ කළා. වසර 41කට පසු ජනමතය සැලකිය යුතු අන්දමින් වෙනස්ව තිබෙනවා.

මෙයට සමාජ-ආර්ථීක හා දේශපාලන සාධක රැසක් බලපෑවා. එසේම එරට මාධ්‍ය මගින් ජනමතය හැසිරවීමට මෙවර ජනමත විචාරණයේ ප්‍රතිඵලවලට තීරණාත්මකව බලපාන ලද බව මාධ්‍ය විචාරකයන්ගේ මතයයි.

මෙවර ජනමත විචාරණයට දින දහයකට පෙර බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයට ගිය මා එම මැතිවරණ ක්‍රියාදාමය හමාර වන තුරුම එහි ගත කරමින් මාධ්‍යවල භූමිකාව සමීපව නිරීක්ෂණය කළා. බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ට පර්යේෂකයන්ට කතා කළා. අද බෙදා ගන්නේ එයින් ලැබූ අදහස් හා විග්‍රහයන්ගේ සම්පිණ්ඩනයක්.

ලන්ඩනයේ ෆ්ලීට් වීදිය (Fleet Street) ඓතිහාසිකව මුද්‍රණ කර්මාන්තයට හා පුවත්පත් ප්‍රකාශනයට ප්‍රකටයි. 1702දි එරට මුල්ම දිනපතා පත්‍රය පටන් ගත්තේද එහි පිහිටි කාර්යාලයකින්. තව දුරටත් බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පුවත්පත් එහි සංකේන්ද්‍රණය වී නැතත්, බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පත්‍ර කර්මාන්තයට පොදු යෙදුමක් ලෙස ෆ්ලීට් වීදිය යන්න යෙදෙනවා.

සියවස් ගණනක් පැවැති ෆ්ලීට් වීදියේ බලපෑම් කිරීමේ හැකියාව ගෙවී ගිය වසර 25 තුළ සෑහෙන තරමට අඩු වෙලා. දැවැන්තයන්ව සිටි සමහර පුවත්පත් වැසී ගිහින්. පොදුවේ පුවත්පත් අලෙවිය අඩු වීම වාර්ෂිකව දිගින් දිගටම සිදු වනවා. අලුත් පරම්පරාව ඩිජිටල්/වෙබ් මාධ්‍ය හරහා ප්‍රවෘත්ති ලබා ගැනීමත්, බහුතරයක් බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයන් (තුනෙන් දෙකක්ම) ටෙලිවිෂන් තමන්ගේ ප්‍රමුඛ පුවත් මූලාශ්‍රය ලෙස සැලකීමත් මේ පසුබෑමට හේතුවී තිබෙනවා.

The Sun and Daily Mail were both strongly for Leaving the EU

The Sun and Daily Mail were both strongly for Leaving the EU

එසේ තිබියදීත් මෙවර ජනමත විචාරණයේදී යුරෝපා සංගමයෙන් ඉවත්වීමට යයි ඡන්දදායකයන්ට දැඩි බලපෑම් කිරීමට සමහර පුවත්පත් සමත් වුණා.

ඕස්ටේලියාවේ ඉපිද දැන් ඇමරිකානු පුරවැසි බව දරන මාධ්‍ය ව්‍යාපාරික රූපට් මර්ඩොක්ගේ (Rupert Murdoch) හිමිකාරීත්වයෙන් යුතු පුවත්පත් මේ අතර කැපී පෙනුණා.

දැන් 85 හැවිරිදි මර්ඩොක් බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පුවත්පත් කර්මාන්තයට පිවිසුනේ 1969දී. මුලින් ජනප්‍රිය රැල්ලේ ටැබ්ලොයිඩ් පත්‍ර (News of the World, The Sun) පටන් ගත් ඔහු ඓතිහාසිකව බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පාලක පන්තියේ පත්‍රය වූ The Times 1981දී මිලට ගත්තා.

මර්ඩොක්ගේ පත්තර බ්‍රිතාන්‍යය යුරෝපා සංගමයෙන් ඉවත් විය යුතු යැයි තර්ක කිරීමට පටන් ගත්තේ 1990දි. ඒ කාලයේ The Sun පත්තරය දිනකට පිටපත් මිලියන 3.6ක් අලෙවි වුණා. දැන් අලෙවිය එයින් බාගයකටත් වඩා අඩුයි.

මර්ඩොක්ගේ මේ යුරෝපා විරෝධයට හේතුවක් ලෙස ඔහුගේ විරුද්ධවාදීන් දකින්නේ යුරෝපා දේශපාලකයන් අල්ලේ නැටවීමට ඔහුට නොහැකි වීමයි. (පත්තරවලට අමතරව ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාද හිමි මර්ඩොක්ට බ්‍රිතානයේ හැම පක්ෂයකම දේශපාලකයෝ බියයි.)

මෙවර ජනමත විචාරණයේදී මර්ඩොක්ගේ The Sun පත්‍රය ප්‍රබල ලෙසම ඉවත්වීම වෙනුවෙන් කැම්පේන් කළා. ඡන්දදායකයන් බහුතරයක් අයත් වැඩ කරන පන්තියේ පාඨකයන් අතර මේ පත්‍රය තාමත් ජනප්‍රියයි.

The Sun front page, 23 June 2016

The Sun front page, 23 June 2016

ජූනි 23දා The Sun පත්‍රයේ මුල්පිටුව මුළුමනින් පෙන්වූයේ (අලුතින් ආ හොලිවුඩ් චිත්‍රපටයක ප්‍රචාරක රූප තරමක් වෙනස් කරමින්) එදින බ්‍රිතාන්‍යයේ නිදහස් දිනය විය යුතු බවයි!

ඒ අතර මර්ඩොක්ගේම The Times පත්‍රය ඊට වඩා මැදහත් ලෙස දෙපාර්ශ්වයටම යම් ආවරණයක් ලබා දුන්නා. මෙය මර්ඩොක්ගේ සටකපට බව තහවුරු කරන බව සමහරුන් කියනවා.

යුරෝපා සංගමයෙන් ඉවත්වීමට යයි විවෘතවම කැම්පේන් කළ තවත් ප්‍රකට පත්තරයක් වූයේ ඩේලි මේල් Daily Mail. මර්ඩොක් ප්‍රකාශන මෙන්ම මෙයද අන්ත දක්ෂිණාංශික දේශපාලන මතවාදයන් වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටිනවා.

මේ ගැන විග්‍රහයක් කළ ගාඩියන් (The Guardian) පත්‍රයේ සහාය කතුවර මාටින් කෙට්ල් කීවේ තම දේශපාලනික අරමුණු වෙනුවෙන් ඕනෑම දුරක් යාමට ඩේලි මේල් නොපැකිලෙන බවයි.

1924 ඔක්තෝබර් මහමැතිවරණයට දින හතරකට පෙර මුළුමනින්ම ගොතන ලද, අසත්‍ය ලියුමක් මේ පත්‍රය පළ කළ බව ඔහු සිහිපත් කළා. එවකට බලයේ සිටි වාමාංශික ලේබර් පක්ෂයේ අගමැති රැම්සේ මැක්ඩොනල්ඩ් වෙත යොමු කෙරුණු ලෙසින් ප්‍රබන්ධිත මේ ලියුමෙන් සෝවියට් කොමියුනිස්ට් පක්ෂ ප්‍රධානියකු ඉල්ලා සිටියේ බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය කම්කරුවන් බොල්ෂෙවික්කරණයට උදව් වන ලෙසයි.

1924 මැතිවරණයෙන් ලේබර් පරාජය වීමට මේ මාධ්‍ය ප්‍රෝඩාව ප්‍රබල හේතුවක් වූවා.

එදා මෙදාතුර වාමාංශික මෙන්ම සමහර දක්ෂිණාංශික (කොන්සර්වෙටිව්) රජයන්ද පෙරළා දැමීමට සූක්ෂ්ම අන්දමින් ඩේලි මේල් ක්‍රියා කොට ඇති සැටි ලේඛනගතයි.

මේවා රහස් නොවේ. එසේම තම දේශපාලන න්‍යාය පත්‍රයන් ක්‍රියාත්මක කිරීමට මාධ්‍ය කලාවේ ආචාර ධර්ම අමු අමුවේම උල්ලංඝනය කළ එකම පත්‍රයද ඔවුන් පමණක් නොවෙයි. මෙය බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයට වැළඳි බරපතළ ව්‍යාධියක් බව මාටින් කෙට්ල් කියනවා.

මාධ්‍ය ආචාරධර්මවලට ගරු කරන, බහුවිධ මතයන්ට ඉඩ සළසන ගාඩියන් හා ඔබ්සර්වර් (The Observer) පත්‍ර වෙනදා මෙන්ම මෙවරද වඩා තුලනාත්මක පුවත් ආවරණයකට හා කර්තෘ මණ්ඩල අදහස් දැක්වීමක නිරත වූවා. යුරෝපා සංගමයේ බ්‍රිතාන්‍යය දිගටම රැඳී සිටිමින් වඩාත් හිතකර කොන්දේසි සාකච්ඡා මගින් ලබාගත යුතු බව මේ පත්‍රවල මතය වූවා.

The Times on 23 Jun2 2016

The Times on 23 June 2016

එහෙත් මේ පත්‍ර දෙකට විශාල අලෙවියක් නැහැ. ඔවුන්ගේ ප්‍රමිතිගත හා සම්භාවනීය මාධ්‍යකරණය සමාජයේ ගෞරවයට පාත්‍ර වුවත් එම මාධ්‍ය සමාගම් පාඩු ලබමින් අමාරුවෙන් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා. (හොඳ මාධ්‍යවලට වෙළඳපොළ ඉල්ලුම අඩු වීම ලොව බොහෝ රටවල දැකිය හැකියි.)

තවත් සම්භාව්‍ය, මැදහත් පුවත්පතක් වන ෆයිනෑන්ෂල් ටයිම්ස් (Financial Times) – පත්‍රයේ විග්‍රහයක් ලියූ මාණ්ඩලික ලේඛක ජෝන් ගැපර් මෙසේ කියා සිටියා. ‘දේශපාලනයට ප්‍රබල බලපෑම් කිරීමට බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පුවත්පත් හිමියන් බොහෝ දෙනකුට වුවමනායි. එහෙත් පත්තර බහුතරයක අලෙවිය ක්ෂීණ වීම නිසා එම බලපෑම් කිරීමේ හැකියාව අඩුව ඇති බව ද ඔවුන් දන්නවා. මීට වසර 25කට පෙර බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය සමාජය සොලවන්න හා ආණ්ඩු පෙරළන්න සමහර පත්තරවලට බලයක් තිබුණා. දැන් ඒ පත්තර නංවන්නේ ඔවුන්ගේ අවසාන ගෙරවුම් නාදය විය හැකියි. තව වසර 25කින් ෆ්ලීට් වීදියේ බලපුළුවන්කාරයන් එක් අයකුවත් ඉතිරි වේදැයි සැක සහිතයි!’

ආවේගශීලී වාර්තාකරණයේ හා සීමාන්තික දේශපාලන මතවාද ප්‍රවර්ධනයේ යෙදුණු පත්‍රවල කතුවරුන් එය සාධාරණීකරණය කිරීමටද තැත් කළා.

Mail Online වෙබ් අඩවි ප්‍රකාශක මාටින් ක්ලාක් කීවේ ‘අපි ජනතාවගේ සිත් තුළ බිය සැක අළුතින් බිහි කරන්නේ නැහැ. අපි කරන්නේ පවතින එම ආවේගයන් පිළිබිඹු කරනවා පමණයි. ඇත්තටම යුරෝපා සංගමය ගැන අපේ සාමාන්‍ය ජනයාට ලොකු ගැටලු තිබෙනවා. දේශපාලන තන්ත්‍රය මේ ජන හඬට සංවේදී විය යුතුයි.’

මේ ජන ආවේගයන් උසි ගැන්වීමේ ආන්තික හා ඛේදජනක ප්‍රතිඵලයක් වූයේ විපක්ෂ ලේබර් පාක්ෂික තරුණ මන්ත්‍රීවරියක් වූ ජෝ කොක්ස් (Jo Cox) 2016 ජූනි 16දා මහ දවාලේ සාහසිකයකු විසින් ඝාතනය කිරීමයි.

2015දී පාර්ලිමේන්තුවට තේරී පත් වූ ප්‍රගතිශීලී හා ජනප්‍රිය මන්ත්‍රීවරියක් වූ ඇය සිරියානු සරණාගතයන් හා වෙනත් ගෝලීය මෙන්ම දේශය සමාජ සාධාරණත්වයන් සඳහා දිගටම පෙනී සිටි, කතා කළ කෙනෙක්.

ඇගේ ඝාතකයා ඇගේ ඡන්ද කොට්ඨාශයේම විසූ, මේ පරමාදර්ශී ප්‍රතිපත්ති බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය ස්වාධීනත්වය කෙළසනවා යයි විශ්වාස කළ අයෙක්. ඔහු මේ මානසිකත්වයට පත් කළේ අන්තවාදී දේශපාලකයෝද. නැත්නම් ජන ආවේග අවුස්සා අමු ගෝත්‍රිකත්වය මතු කළ ජනමාධ්‍යයද? මෙය ඉදිරි අධිකරණ ක්‍රියාදාමයේදී විමර්ශනයට ලක් වේවි.

ජෝ කොක්ස්ගේ ඝාතනය සමස්ත බ්‍රිතාන්‍යය දැඩි කම්පනයට ලක් කළා. ජනමත විචාරණ කැම්පේන් සියල්ල දින තුනකට නතර කරනු ලැබුවා. එහෙත් අවසානයේදී ජනමතය හැරුණේ ඇය පෙනී සිටි පැත්තට නොවෙයි. ආවේගශීලී පාර්ශවයන් පෙනී සිටි යුරෝපා සංගමය හැර යාමටයි.

මාධ්‍ය සදාචාරය ගැන විමර්ශනය කරන්නට 2011 ජූලි මාසයේ බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය අගමැති ඩේවිඩ් කැමරන්, ලෙවිසන් (Lord Leveson) නම් විනිසුරුවරයාගේ ප්‍රධානත්වයෙන් අධිකරණ ස්වරූපයේ විමර්ශනයක් ආරම්භ කළා. එය මාස ගණනක අදහස් විමසීම්වලින් හා විභාග කිරීම්වලින් පසු නිර්දේශ කළේ ස්වාධීන, අලුත් මාධ්‍ය පැමිණිලි කොමිසමක් අවශ්‍ය බවයි.

පුවත්පත් ප්‍රකාශකයන් හා කතුවරුන් පවත්වා ගෙන යන ස්වේච්ඡා පුවත්පත් පැමිණිලි කොමිසම නොසෑහෙන බවත්, එය අකාර්යක්ෂම බවත් පෙන්වා දෙනු ලැබුවා. එහෙත් අගමැති කැමරන් නව නීතියක් හරහා මාධ්‍ය පැමිණිලි කොමිසමක් පිහිටුවීමට මේ දක්වා ක්‍රියා කොට නැහැ. දැන් ජනමත විචාරණයෙන් පසු ඔහු තනතුර අත්හැර යාමට තීරණට කොට තිබෙනවා.

Financial Times (FT) cover - 25 - 26 June 2016

Financial Times (FT) cover – 25 – 26 June 2016

බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය සමාජය මාධ්‍ය නිදහස ඉහළින් අගය කරනවා. මාධ්‍යවලින් නිර්දය ලෙස විවේචනය කරනු ලබන දේශපාලකයන් පවා මාධ්‍ය නිදහස සීමා කිරීමට විරුද්ධයි.

 එහෙත් මාධ්‍ය නිදහස අවභාවිත කරමින් ජනයා නොමඟ යැවීමට, ප්‍රචණ්ඩකාරී ආවේගයන් උසි ගැන්වීමට හා අන්තවාදී දේශපාලන මතවාද ප්‍රවර්ධනයට සමහරක් බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය මාධ්‍ය යොමු වීම කලක සිට පෙනෙන ප්‍රවණතාවක්. මෙවර ජනමත විචාරණයේ එය පැහැදිලිව තහවුරු වුණා.

වැරදි තොරතුරු හා පක්ෂග්‍රාහී විග්‍රහයන් හරහා ජනමතය අයාලේ ගෙන යාමට මාධ්‍යවලට අසීමිත නිදහසක් තිබිය යුතුද? ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදයේ මුර දෙවියකු වන ජනමාධ්‍ය, දේවාලයේ තක්කඩි කපුරාල බවට පත්වීම වළක්වා ගත හැකිද?

මහජන ඡන්දයෙන් පත්වන දේශපාලන නායකයන් ධුර කාලයට පෙර පැරදවීමට කිසිදු පත්‍ර හිමියකුට හෝ කතුවරයකුට හෝ ඉඩ තිබිය යුතුද? ව්‍යාපාරික හා දේශපාලන අරමුණු උදෙසා මාධ්‍ය වගකීම් හා ආචාර ධර්ම මඟහැර යාමට මාධ්‍යවලට දැනට තිබෙන නිදහස සාධාරණ ලෙස සීමාවකට නතු කළ හැකිද?

මේ ප්‍රශ්න වඩාත් උනන්දුවෙන් බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය සමාජය විවාද කරන්නට පටන් අරන්. මේ සංවාද ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට හා ලක් සමාජයටත් ඍජුවම අදාළයි.

See also:

The Guardian, 24 June 2016: Did the Mail and Sun help swing the UK towards Brexit?