Dreaming of a Truly Civilised Society in Sri Lanka…where everyone’s dignity is ensured!

Gay Rights are Human Rights!

When I spoke out on social media recently for the rights of sexual minorities in Sri Lanka, some wanted to know why I cared for these ‘deviants’ – one even asked if I was ‘also one of them’.

I didn’t want to dignify such questions with an immediate answer. However, in my mind, it is quite clear why I stand for the rights of the LGBTQ community and other minorities – who are marginalised, in some cases persecuted, for simply being different.

I stand with all left-handed persons, or ‘lefties’, not because I am one of them but because I support their right to be the way they were born.

I share the cause of the disabled, not because I am currently living with a disability, but because I support their right to accessibility and full productive lives.

I call for governmental and societal protection of all displaced persons – from wars, disasters or other causes – not because I am currently displaced, but because I believe in their right to such support with dignity.

I march with women from all walks of life not because I am a woman, but because I fully share their cause for equality and justice. In their case, they are not a minority but the majority – and yet, very often, oppressed.

Similarly, I raise my voice for all sexual minorities in the LGBTQ community not because I am one of them, but because I am outraged by the institutionalised discrimination against them in Sri Lanka. I uphold their right to equality and to lead normal lives with their own sexual orientations and identities.

How much longer do we have to wait for a Lankan state that treats ALL its citizens as equal?

How much further must we wait for a Lankan society that does not discriminate against some of its own members who just happen to be differently inclined or differently-abled?

Advertisements

LGBT Rights: සියලු මානවයන්ගේ අයිතීන් රකින ශිෂ්ට සමාජයක් කරා…

Gay Rights are Human Rights!

සමරිසි හා සෙසු ලිංගික සුලුතරයන්ගේ අයිතීන් වෙනුවෙන් මා විටින් විට පොදු අවකාශයේ කථා කරන්නේ මාත් එපිරිසේ සාමාජිකයකු නිසාදැයි අසන අයට දෙන්න හිතෙන (එහෙත් මෝඩයන්ට කථා කොට වැඩක් නැති නිසා නොකියා සිටින) උත්තරය මෙයයි:

මා පෙනී සිටින්නේ මාත් ඇතුලු මානව පවුලේ සියලුම සාමාජිකයන්ට සමාන මානව අයිතිවාසිකම් තහවුරු කිරීම යන පරමාදර්ශය වෙනුවෙන්.

මා වමත්කරුවන්ගේ අයිතීන් වැදගත් යයි පිළිගන්නේ මා වමත්කරුවකු නොවූවත් උපතින් එසේ වන අයට මට තරමටම අයිතීන් ඇති නිසා.

මා ආබාධිත අයිතීන් වෙනුවෙන් කථා කරන්නේ මේ මොහොතෙහි මා ආබාධිත නිසාද නොවෙයි. එහෙත් ආබාධිත වූ පමණට කිසිවකුගේ මානව අයිතීන් කප්පාදු කරන්නට ශිෂ්ට සමාජයකට ඉඩ දිය නොහැකි නිසා.

මා සරණාගතයන්ට සාධාරණය ඉටු විය යුතු යයි කියන්නේ මේ මොහොතේ  මා ද අවතැන් වී සිටින නිසා නොවෙයි (යම් දිනෙක එසේ වන්නටද ඉඩ තිබෙනවා). තම පාලනයෙන් බාහිර සාධක නිසා එසේ අවතැන් වූවන්ට ඇති අයිතීන්ට මා ගරු කරන නිසා.

මා කාන්තා අයිතීන් වෙනුවන් කථා කරන්නේ මා කාන්තාවක් නිසා නොවෙයි. නමුත් කාන්තාවන්ට සම අයිතීන් තිබිය යුතු බව මා තරයේ විශ්වාස කරන නිසා.

මා සමරිසි අය, ලිංගික සංක්‍රාන්තිකයන්, තම ලිංගිකත්වය අවිනිශ්චිත වූ හෝ එය ප්‍රතිවිග්‍රහ කරන්නට තැත් කරන යන සියල්ලන්ගේ අයිතීන් එකහෙලා පිලිගන්නේ මා ඔවුන්ගෙන් එක් අයකු නිසා නොවෙයි. නමුත් විෂමලිංගික අධිපතිවාදයට නතු නොවී, උපතින්ම තමන් ලද ලිංගික නැඹුරුවට අනුව ජීවත්වීමට ඔවුන්ට ඇති පරම අයිතියට මා ගරු කරන නිසා.

නිර්දය හා වැඩවසම් සමාජයකින් අත්මිදී, සමානාත්මතාව මත පදනම් වූ සමාජයක් බිහි කරන්නට නම් මෙකී නොකී සාධක කිසිවක් නිසා කිසිවකුත් අවමානයට හෝ අසාධාරණයන්ට ලක් වීමට ඉඩ නොදිය යුතුයි.

එවන් ශිෂ්ට සමාජයක් අපේ රටේ බිහි කරන්නට අප තව කොතෙක් දුර යා යුතුද?

තව කොපමණ කලක් බලා සිටිය යුතුද?

[Op-ed] Sri Lanka’s RTI ‘Glass’ is Slowly Filling Up

Op-ed published in Ceylon Today broadsheet newspaper on Sunday, 1 April 2018:

Sri Lanka’s RTI Glass is Slowly Filling Up

by Nalaka Gunawardene

In June 2016, Sri Lanka became the 108th country in the world to pass a law allowing citizens to demand information from the government. After a preparatory period of six months, citizens were allowed to exercise their newly granted Right to Information (RTI) by filing information applications from February 2017 onward.

Just over a year later, the results are a mixed bag of successes, challenges and frustrations. There have been formidable teething problems – some sorted out by now, while others continue to slow down the new law’s smooth operation.

On the ‘supply side’ of RTI, several thousand ‘public authorities’ at central, provincial and local government level had to get ready to practise the notion of ‘open government’.  This includes the all government ministries, departments, state corporations, other stator bodies and companies that are wholly or majority state owned. Despite training programmes and administrative circulars, there remain some gaps in officials’ attitudes, capacity and readiness to process citizens’ RTI applications.

To be sure, we should not expect miracles in one year after we have had 25 centuries of closed government under all the Lankan monarchs, colonial rulers and post-independence governments. RTI is a major conceptual and operational ‘leap’ for some public authorities and officials who have hidden or denied information rather than disclosed or shared it with the public.

Owing to this mindset, some officials have been trying to play hide-and-seek with RTI applications. Others are grudgingly abiding by the letter of the law — but not its spirit. These challenges place a greater responsibility on active citizens to pursue their RTI applications indefatigably.

During the first year of operation, the independent RTI Commission had received a little over 400 appeals from persistent citizens who refused to take ‘No’ for an answer. In a clear majority of cases heard so far, the Commission has ordered disclosure of information that was initially declined. These rulings are sending a clear message to all public authorities: RTI is not a choice, but a legal imperative. Fall in line, or else…

To ensure all public authorities comply with this law, it is vital to sustain citizen pressure. This is where the ‘demand side’ of RTI needs a lot more work. Unlike most other laws of the land that government uses, RTI is a rare law that citizens have to exercise – government only responds. Experience across Asia and elsewhere shows that the more RTI is used by people, the sharper and stronger it becomes.

It is hard to assess current public awareness levels on RTI without doing a large sample survey (one is being planned). However, there is growing anecdotal evidence to indicate that more Lankans have heard about RTI even if they are not yet clear on specifics.

But we still have plenty to do on the demand side: citizens need to see RTI as a tool for solving their local level problems – both private and public grievances – and be motivated to file more RTI applications. For this, they must overcome a historical deference towards government, and start demanding answers more vociferously.

Citizens who have been denied clear or any answers to their pressing problems – on missing persons, land rights, subsidies or public spending – are using RTI as an additional tool. We need to sustain momentum. RTI is a marathon, not a sprint.

Even though some journalists and editors were at the forefront in advocating for RTI in Sri Lanka for over two decades, the Lankan media as a whole is yet to grasp RTI’s potential.

Promisingly, some younger journalists have been producing impressive public interest stories – on topics as varied as disaster responses, waste management and human rights abuses – based on what they uncovered with their RTI applications. One of them, working for a Sinhala language daily, has filed over 40 RTI applications and experienced a success rate of around 70 per cent.

Meanwhile, some civil society groups are helping ordinary citizens to file RTI applications. A good example is the Vavuniya-based youth group, the Association for Friendship and Love (AFRIEL), that spearheads a campaign to submit RTI applications across Sri Lanka’s Northern Province, seeking information on private land that has been occupied by the military during the civil war and beyond. Sarvodaya, Sri Lanka’s largest development organisation, is running RTI clinics in different parts of the country with Transparency International Sri Lanka to equip citizens to exercise this new right.

The road to open government is a bumpy one, but there is no turning back on this journey. RTI in Sri Lanka may not yet have opened the floodgates of public information, but the dams are slowly but surely breached. Watch this space.

Disclosure: The writer works with both government and civil society groups in training and promoting RTI. These views are his own.

ලක් ජනගහනයෙන් බාගයක්ම 1985ට පසු උපන් අයයි. මෙය වැදගත් ඇයි?

ජනගහනයක මධ්‍යස්ථ වයස (Median Age) කියන්නේ එම පිරිස වයස අනුව එක සමාන කාණ්ඩ දෙකකට බෙදිය හැකි වයසයි. එනම් ජනයාගෙන් හරි අඩක් එම වයසට වඩා බාල වන විට ඉතිරි අඩ එම වයසට වඩා වැඩිමහල්. මධ්‍යස්ථ වයස් අගය කාලයත් සමග ටිකෙන් ටික වෙනස් වනවා.

The median divides the age distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median age and one-half above the median.

2012දී අවසන් ජන සංගණනය කළ අවස්ථාවේ මෙරට මධ්‍යස්ථ වයස 31ක් වූවා. 2016 වන විට එය අවුරුදු 32.5 දක්වා ඉහළ ගිහින්. ජනගහනයක ළමා හා තරුණ ප්‍රතිශතය කෙමෙන් අඩු වන විට මධ්‍යස්ථ අගය වැඩි වනවා. (60ට වැඩි ජනගහනය ඉහළ ජපානයේ මේ අගය අවුරුඩු 46.9යි. ඉන්දියාවේ මධ්‍යස්ථ වයස අවුරුදු 27.6ක් වන අතර පාකිස්ථානයේ එය 23.4යි.)

අපේ ජනගහනය සම්බන්ධයෙන් බලන විට අද ලක් ජනයාගෙන් බාගයක්ම 1985 හෝ ඊට පසුව උපන් අයයි. ඒ කියන්නේ 1983 කළු ජූලියට පසුවයි. 1987-89 භීෂන සමය ගැනවත් මේ කිසිවකුට හරිහැටි මතකයන් තිබිය නොහැකියි.

1977 ආර්ථිකය විවෘත කිරීමට පෙර තිබූ සමාජවාදී විකාරයන් හෝ 1982 ජනමත විචාරණය හෝ අත්විඳ ඇත්තේ රටේ බාගයකට වඩා අඩු පිරිසක්. රටේ බහුතරයක් දෙනාට මහවැලිය හැරවීම, ඉන්දු- ලංකා ගිවිසුම ආදිය පොතපතින් කියවන සිදුවීම් පමණයි.

මෙය ප්‍රායෝගිකව වැදගත් වන්නේ මේ නිසයි: මෑත ඉතිහාසය ගැන නොයෙක් දෙනා මාධ්‍යවල හා දේශපාලන වේදිකාවල නොයෙක් විග්‍රහයන් කරනනවා. අමූලික බොරු මෙන්ම සත්‍යය විකෘති කිරීම් එමටයි.

මතක තබා ගත යුත්තේ 1990ට පමණ පෙර සිදු වූ කිසිවක් ගැන සෘජු මතකයන් හෝ අත්දැකීම් අද ලක් සමාජයෙන් බාගයකට නොමැති බවයි.

More data: http://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/median-age-by-country/

 

[Echelon column] Sri Lanka’s Dilemma: Open Economy, Closed Minds

Column appearing in December 2016 issue of Echelon business magazine, Sri Lanka

Echelon magazine, Dec 2016 issue - column by Nalaka Gunawardene

Echelon magazine, Dec 2016 issue – column by Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s Dilemma: Open Economy, Closed Minds

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Each time I see a Finance Minister struggling to deliver annual budget speeches, I remember Ronnie de Mel.

President J R Jayewardene’s Finance Minister from 1977 to 1988 was one of the most colourful and articulate persons to have held that portfolio. Ronnie was instrumental in creating the free market economy, ending years of socialist misadventures in the early 1970s.

In a recent economic policy speech, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe described the 1977-78 policy switch as the ‘first generation of economic and social reforms’.

Ronnie, now a nonagenarian, still keeps an eye on the transformative reforms he initiated. In a recent media interview (The Nation, 24 Sep 2016), he recalled the big challenges his government had faced in explaining to the people about the benefits of an open economy.

“The whole country…had all got so used to a closed economy that it was rather difficult to convince them that an open economy with certain restrictions would be better for Sri Lanka than the closed economy which had been in existence for a long period and was strongly supported by the leftist parties and by a powerful section of the Sri Lanka Freedom Party,” he said.

The hardest part, according to Ronnie, had been to get the media to support those reforms. “In fact, it took a long time to convince the press that the open economy would be better for Sri Lanka than the closed economy. As has always to be emphasized, it had to be an open economy which would safeguard the poor.”

Closed Minds

JR and Ronnie set in motion economic reforms that have since been sustained by successive governments, sometimes with minor modifications. We will soon be completing four full decades under free market policies.

Yet the market still seems a dirty word for some Lankans, especially those in their middle or advanced ages. Their mistrust of the country’s economic system occasionally rubs off on the younger generation too, as evidenced by university students’ political slogans.

There is a pervasive notion in our society that businesses are intrinsically damaging and exploitative. I attribute this to ‘residual socialism’: we have plenty of frustrated socialists who grudge the current system, even though they often benefit from it personally.

So we pursue free market economics only half-heartedly. We were never a communist state but we seem to be more ‘red’ than Marx, Lenin and Mao combined.

In other words, many among us have closed their minds about the open economy.

Yes, it’s a free country and everyone is entitled to own myths, beliefs and nostalgic fantasies. But collectively harking back to the bad old days – and romanticising them – does not help anyone, and can distort policy choices. Protectionism and monopolies can thrive in such a setting.

Anti-market attitudes also feed public apprehensions about entrepreneurship in general, and against certain economic sectors in particular.

Pervasive prejudices

Take, for example, the tourist industry. Half a century has passed since Sri Lanka adopted policies of tourism development and promotion, but large sections of society still harbour misgivings about it.

Never mind that nearly 320,000 persons had direct or indirect employment in the tourism sector in 2015, or how a large number of small and medium businesses depend on tourist income for survival. Certain ‘guardians of culture’ and a moralist media are obsessed with the sexual exploitation associated with (a relatively small number of) tourists.

A few years ago, I helped organise an environmental education programme for school children in the Negombo area. A leading hotel chain which originated from that city provided the venue and catering for free. Yet some accompanying teachers were rather uneasy over our venue choice: for them, all tourist hotels seemed to be ‘dens of vice’.

This perception, reinforced by prejudiced commentary in Sinhala language newspapers, extends to other sections of the leisure industry such as spas. I recently heard how a Lankan spa chain struggles to recruit female therapists. Because spas are demonised by media and society, few women apply despite the competitive salaries.

Societal prejudices might also be one reason why the country’s 12 industrial zones, administered by the Board of Investment (BOI), are struggling to fill some 200,000 vacancies from the domestic labour market. Many youth would much rather drive three-wheelers instead of working in factories. There are no sociological insights as yet on why they frown upon such work.

Media portrayal

To be sure, there are unscrupulous businessmen who cynically exploit our country’s poor governance and weak regulation. There are also some schemers and confidence tricksters. But our anti-biz media would make us believe that all entrepreneurs are corrupt and untrustworthy.

Study any Sinhala daily for about a week, and we are bound to find several headlines or news reports using the phrase Kotipathi Viyaparikaya (multi-millionaire businessman). In the peculiar worldview of Sinhala journalists, every businessman is a kotipathiya, and is usually presumed guilty until proven innocent! Often a Roomath Kanthawa (pretty woman) is linked to the businessman, suggesting some scandal.

Tele drama makers love to portray businessmen as villains. Newspaper editorials frequently highlight unethical biz practices, condemning all businesspersons in the process. Bankers and telecom operators get more than their fair share of bashing in letters to the editor.

And even our usually perceptive cartoonists caricaturise entrepreneurs almost always negatively – either as pot-bellied black market mudalalis, or as bulging men in black suits and dark glasses, complete with a sinister smile. These images influence how society thinks of business.

Lankan industrialists vs the country's first environment minister Vincent Perera. Cartoon by W R Wijesoma, circa 1991

Lankan industrialists vs the country’s first environment minister Vincent Perera. Cartoon by W R Wijesoma, circa 1992

Rebuilding Trust

So what is to be done?

Teaching business and commerce in schools is useful — but totally insufficient to create a nation of entrepreneurs and a business friendly public. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can help soften society’s harsh judgement of business and enterprise. But that too needs a careful balancing act, as a lot of CSR is self-serving or guilt-assuaging and not particularly addressing the real community needs.

More ethically driven businesses and less ostentatious biz conduct would go a long way in winning public trust. As would more sensitive and thoughtful brand promotion.

The biggest challenge now, as it was to Ronnie a generation ago, is to nurture a media that appreciates and critically cheers entrepreneurship.

Paradoxically, media’s own revenues rely critically on advertising from other businesses. No, we are not asking media to compromise their editorial independence under advertiser pressure. But simply toning down media’s rampant and ill-founded prejudices against entrepreneurship would be progress.

The open economy’s legacy must be rigorously debated, and the policy framework needs periodic review. Let’s hope that it can be done with more open minds.

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene is on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com.

Social Media in Sri Lanka: Do Science and Reason Stand a Chance?

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on "Using Social Media for Discussing Science" at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on “Using Social Media for Discussing Science” at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka’s first Science and Technology for Society (STS) Forum took place from 7 to 10 September in Colombo. Organized by the Prime Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Research, it was one of the largest gatherings of its kind to be hosted by Sri Lanka.

Modelled on Japan’s well known annual STS forums, the event was attended by over 750 participants coming from 24 countries – among them local and foreign scientists, inventors, science managers, science communicators and students.

I was keynote speaker during the session on ‘Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics’. I used it to highlight how social media have become both a boon and bane for scientific information and thinking in Sri Lanka. This is due to peddlers of pseudo-science, anti-science and superstition being faster and better to adopt social media platforms than actual scientists, science educators and science communicators.

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka takes justified pride in its high literacy levels and equally high coverage of vaccination against infectious diseases. But we cannot claim to have a high level of scientific literacy. If we did, it would not be so easy for far-fetched conspiracy theories to spread rapidly even among educated persons. Social media tools have ‘turbo-charged’ the spread of associated myths, superstitions and conspiracy theories!

I cautioned: “Unless we make scientific literacy an integral part of everyone’s lives, ambitious state policies and programmes to modernize the nation could well be jeopardized. Progress can be undermined — or even reversed — by extremist forces of tribalism, feudalism and ultra-nationalism that thrive in a society that lacks the ability to think critically.”

It is not a case of all doom and gloom. I cited examples of private individuals creatively using social media to bust myths and critique all ‘sacred cows’ in Lankan society – including religions and military. These voluntary efforts contrast with much of the mainstream media cynically making money from substantial advertising from black magic industries that hoodwink and swindle the public.

My PowerPoint presentation:

 

Video recording of our full session:

 

The scoping note I wrote for our session:

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016. L to R - Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti & Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016.
L to R – Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti &
Smriti Daniel

Session: Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics

With 30 per cent of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people regularly using the Internet, web-based social media platforms have become an important part of the public sphere where myriad conversations are unfolding on all sorts of topics and issues. Facebook is the most popular social media outlet in Sri Lanka, with 3.5 million users, but other niche platforms like Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are also gaining ground. Meanwhile, the Sinhala and Tamil blogospheres continue to provide space for discussions ranging from prosaic to profound. Marketers, political parties and activist groups have discovered that being active in social media is to their advantage.

Some science and technology related topics also get discussed in this cacophony, but given the scattered nature of conversations, it is impossible to grasp the full, bigger picture. For example, some individuals or entities involved in water management, climate advocacy, mental health support groups and data-driven development (SDG framework) are active in Sri Lanka’s social media platforms. But who is listening, and what influence – if any – are these often fleeting conservations having on individual lifestyles or public policies?

Is there a danger that self-selecting thematic groups using social media are creating for themselves ‘echo chambers’ – a metaphorical description of a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an “enclosed” system, where different or competing views are dismissed, disallowed, or under-represented?

Even if this is sometimes the case, can scientists and science communicators afford to ignore social media altogether? For now, it appears that pseudo-science and anti-science sentiments – some of it rooted in ultra-nationalism or conspiracy theories — dominate many Lankan social media exchanges. The keynote speaker once described this as Lankan society permanently suspending disbelief. How and where can the counter-narratives be promoted on behalf of evidenced based, rational discussions? Is this a hopeless task in the face of irrationality engulfing wider Lankan society? Or can progressive and creative use of social media help turn the tide in favour of reason?

This panel would explore these questions with local examples drawn from various fields of science and skeptical enquiry.

 

 

සිවුමංසල කොලුගැටයා #282: ඇනුම් බැනුම් මැද මහ බරක් දරන අපේ සෞඛ්‍ය සේවය

ඇනුම් බැනුම් මැද මහ බරක් දරන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවය. http://ravaya.lk/?p=17269

ඇනුම් බැනුම් මැද මහ බරක් දරන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවය.
http://ravaya.lk/?p=17269

The South-East Asia Region of the World Health Organization (WHO-SEARO) held its 69th Regional Committee meeting in Colombo from 5 to 9 September 2016. The meeting of 15 ministers of health from the region took a close look at Sri Lanka’s public health system – which has been able to provide substantial value over the decades.

Yet, the public health system rares gets the credit it deserves: the media and citizens alike often highlight its shortcomings without acknowledging what it delivers, year after year.

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala, appearing in the print issue of 4 Sep 2016), I salute the public health system of Sri Lanka that has accomplished much amidst various challenges.

Sri Lanka’s public hospitals and related field programmes – like public health inspectors, family health workers and specific disease control efforts — provide a broad range of preventive and curative services. In most cases, these are provided free to recipients, irrespective of their ability to pay.

This is sustained by taxes: Sri Lanka’s public health sector annually receives allocations equal to around 2% of the country’s GDP.

I quote from the recently released Sri Lanka National Health Accounts (2013) report. Its data analysis shows that the Government of Sri Lanka accounts for 55% of the total health care provision of the country. Considering all financial sources (public and private), the per capita current health expenditure of Sri Lanka in 2013 amounted to LKR 12,636 (97.2 US$).

L to R - Dr Palitha Mahipala, Director General of Health Services, and Dr Jacob Kumaresan, WHO Representative to Sri lanka [WHO Photo]

L to R – Dr Palitha Mahipala, Director General of Health Services, and Dr Jacob Kumaresan, WHO Representative to Sri lanka [WHO Photo]

කොතරම් කළත් ලෙහෙසියෙන් හොඳක් නොඅසන රාජ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයන් තිබෙනවා. එයින් එකක් තමයි අපේ මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාව.

බැනුම් අසමින්, පම්පෝරිවලින් තොරව නිහඬව ලොකු වැඩ කරන මේ සේවය එළඹෙන සතියේ ආසියානු කලාපීය අවධානයට හා ඇගැයීමට ලක් වනවා. ඒ ලෝක සෞඛ්‍ය සංවිධානයේ (WHO) අග්නිදිග ආසියාතික කලාපයේ රටවල් 11ක සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යවරුන් සැප්තැම්බර් 5-9 දිනවල ඔවුන්ගේ වාර්ෂික රැස්වීම කොළඹදී පවත්වන නිසයි.

ලක් රජය සාමාජිකත්වය දරන අන්තර් රාජ්‍ය සංවිධානයක් වන WHO මෙරට ක්‍රියාත්මකවීම ඇරඹුණේ 1952දී. එනම් අප එක්සත් ජාතීන්ගේ සාමාජිකත්වය ලබන්නටත් වසර තුනකට පෙර.

වසර 65ක පමණ කාලයක් තිස්සේ මෙරට සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා නගා සිටුවීමට තාක්ෂණික උපදෙස් දෙන මේ ආයතනයේ මෙරටින් බිහිවූ වෛද්‍ය විශේෂඥයන් ගණනාවක්ද සේවය කරනවා.

ආදර්ශමත් සෞඛ්‍ය සේවයක් ලෙස WHO අප රට හඳුනා ගන්නේ ඇයි?

ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ දේශීය වෙදකම් හා ප්‍රතිකාරවලට දිගු ඉතිහාසයක් තිබෙනවා. මේ ගැන සංක්ෂිප්ත විස්තරයක් වෛද්‍ය සී. ජී. ඌරගොඩ 1987දී ලියූ ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ වෛද්‍ය විද්‍යාවේ ඉතිහාසය නම් පොතෙහි හමු වනවා. goo.gl/qBwMP6

එම මූලාශ්‍රයට අනුව නූතන, බටහිර වෛද්‍ය විද්‍යාව මෙරට ස්ථාපිත වන්නේ ලන්දේසි හා බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පාලන යුගවලයි. ස්වදේශිකයන්ට ක්‍රමවත් මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවක් ලබා දීමේ ප්‍රතිපත්තිමය තීරණ රැසක් ගනු ලැබුවේ බ්‍රිතාන්‍ය පාලකයන් විසින්.

වෛද්‍ය පර්යේෂණ විධිමත් ලෙස ඇරඹුණේද 1800න් පසුවයි. සිවිල් වෛද්‍ය දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව ලෙස 1801දී ඇරඹි රාජ්‍ය ආයතනය සෞඛ්‍ය දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවේ පූර්වගාමියා ලෙස දැකිය හැකියි. වසූරියට එරෙහිව එන්නත් කිරීම 1802දී ඇරඹුනා.

ප්‍රාථමික සෞඛ්‍ය කටයුතු සඳහා සෞඛ්‍ය ඒකක පිහිටුවීම ඇරඹුණේ 1926දී කළුතරින්. අද වන විට සෞඛ්‍ය නිලධාරී හෙවත් MOH කාර්යාල බවට පරිණාමය වී ඇත්තේ මේවායි.

මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාව යනු විවිධ වෘත්තිකයන් හා සේවකයන් රාශියකින් සමන්විත, දැවැන්ත ආයතනික ව්‍යුහයක්. වෛද්‍යවරුන්, හෙද සේවකයන්, රසායනාගාර තාක්ෂණවේදීන්, පරිපාලකයන්, පවුල් සෞඛ්‍ය සේවිකාවන්, සහකාර වෛද්‍ය සේවා, විශේෂිත බෝවන රෝග මර්දන එකක (මැලේරියා, ඩෙංගු. HIV ආදී) වැනි බොහොමයක් එයට අයත්.

ලක් සමාජය නිරෝගීව පවත්වා ගන්නට සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාව ප්‍රතිකාර මට්ටමින් (curative) හා වළක්වා ගැනීමේ මට්ටමින් (preventive) දිවා රාත්‍රී කරන මහා ව්‍යායාමයට ඇති තරම් අගය කිරීමක් නොලැබෙන බව මගේ අදහසයි.

එසේම මේ සද්දන්තයාගේ ක්‍රියාකාරීත්වය ගැන ඇතුළත දැක්මකින් සමාජයට තතු හෙළි කරන පිරිස ද අල්පයි. කලක් සෞඛ්‍ය සේවයේ සිට විශ්‍රාමික වෛද්‍ය ආරියසේන යූ. ගමගේ ලියන පුවත්පත් ලිපි හා පොත් හරහා අපට යම් ඉඟියක් ලද හැකියි.

රටේ ආදායම් මට්ටමට වඩා ඉහළ සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා දර්ශකයන් ලබා ගැනීමට සියවස් දෙකකට වැඩි කාලයක් ලද රාජ්‍ය අනුග්‍රහය හා ප්‍රමුඛතාව දායක වී තිබෙනවා.

උදාහරණයකට 2012 වන විට අපේ රටේ වයස අවුරුද්දට අඩු ළදරු මරණ අනුපාතිකය සජීව උපත් 1,000කට 8යි.  වයස 5ට අඩු ළමා මරණ අනුපාතිකය 12යි (2012). දරුවන් ලැබීම ආශ්‍රිතව සිදුවන මාතෘ මරණ සංඛ්‍යාව සජීව දරු උපත් ලක්ෂයකට 30යි.

මේ වන විට අපේ රටේ උපතේ දී අපේක්ෂා කළ හැකි ආයු කාලය පිරිමින්ට වසර 72ක්ද, ගැහැනුන්ට වසර 78.6ක්ද වනවා.

මෙකී නොකී මානව සංවර්ධන සාධක අතින් ශ්‍රී ලංකාව සිටින්නේ අපට වඩා වැඩි දළ ජාතික ආදායමක් ඇති බොහෝ රටවලට ඉදිරියෙන්.

එහෙත් සෞඛ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයේ අභියෝග කාලයත් සමග වෙනස් වනවා.

සමාජයක් ලෙස අපට තිබෙන ලොකු සෞඛ්‍ය අභියෝගයක් නම් ජීවත් වන කාලය තුළ හැකි තාක් දෙනෙකුට හැකි තාක් සෞඛ්‍යසම්පන්න, ඵලදායක ජීවන මට්ටම් ලබා දීමයි. වයස්ගත වීමේදී යම් අබල දුබලවීම් සිදුවීම ස්වාභාවික වුවත් නිදන්ගත රෝග හට ගැනීම අවම කර ගත යුතුව තිබෙනවා.

මෑතදී කොළඹ පැවති මාධ්‍ය හමුවකදී සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා අධ්‍යක්ෂ ජනරාල් වෛද්‍ය පාලිත මහීපාල අද ලක් සමාජය මුහුණදෙන සෞඛ්‍ය අභියෝග ගැන මනා විග්‍රහයක් කළා.

ඔහු කීවේ වත්මන් ශ්‍රී ලංකාව සංක්‍රාන්තීන් ගණනාවකට මැදිව සිටින බවයි.

  • ජන විකාසමය සංක්‍රාන්තිය (demographic transition)( අති බහුතරයක් ළමයින් හා තරුණ තරුණියන්ගෙන් සමන්විතව තිබූ ජනසංයුතියක සිට අප කෙමෙන් මැදිවියේ හා වයස 60 ඉක්මවූවන් බහුතරයක් සිටින ජන සංයුතියකට යොමු වෙමින් සිටිනවා. 2012දී වයස 60ට වැඩි ප්‍රතිශතය 5%යි. 2031 වන විට මෙය 25%ක් වීමට ප්‍රක්ෂේපිතයිග මේ අයට බෝනොවන රෝග ඇතිවීමේ ප්‍රවණතාව වැඩියි.
  • රෝග තත්ත්ව සංක්‍රාන්තිය (epidemiological transition)( බහුතරයක් රෝග තත්ත්ව (හා මරණ) බෝවන රෝග නිසා හට ගත් යුගයේ සිට සමාජය කෙමෙන් ගමන් කරන්නේ බහුතරයක් බෝ නොවන රෝග හටගැනීමටයි.
  • පෝෂණ විද්‍යාත්මක සංක්‍රාන්තිය (nutritional transition)( කලකට පෙර වඩාත් සිරුරට හිතකර හා සමබර ආහාර ගත් අපේ ජනයාගේ ආහාර පරිභෝජන රටා ශීඝ්‍රයෙන් වෙනස් වෙමින් තිබෙනවා. දුවන ගමන් ගන්නා බොහෝ ආහාර දිගු කාලීනව අහිතකරයි. මේවා බෝ නොවන රෝගවලට දායක වනවා.
  • ආර්ථීක සංක්‍රාන්තිය (economic transition): අඩු ආදායම්ලාභී රටක සිට මධ්‍යම ආදායම් ලබන රටක තත්ත්වයට අප පිවිස සිටිනවා. දුප්පත්කම මුළුමනින් තුරන් කර නැතත් මීට වසර 20කට පෙර තිබුණාට වඩා අද රටේ ජනයා අත මුදල් ගැවසෙනවා.
  • ඩිජිටල් සංක්‍රාන්තිය (digital transition)( රටේ සමස්ත ජන සංඛ්‍යාව ඉක්මවා යන ජංගම දුරකතන සක්‍රිය ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය විහිදයාමත් පුළුල්. මින් පෙර නොතිබූ ලෙස තොරතුරු ගලා යාමේ මාර්ග තිබෙනවා. ලෙඩරෝග හා ප්‍රතිකාර ගැන වැඩියෙන් දැන ගැනීම හරහා වඩාත් ඉහළ මට්ටමේ සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවක් පුරවැසියෝ ඉල්ලා සිටිනවා.

මේ විග්‍රහයට මා මුළුමනින් එකඟයි. එයට තවත් එක් සංක්‍රාන්තියක් මා එකතු කරනවා. එනම් ජන ආකල්පමය සංක්‍රාන්තියයි (attitudinal transition).

දේශපාලකයන් හා නිලධාරීන් කියන දේ දොහොත් මුදුන් දී පිළිගෙන අනුගමනය කිරීමට අද  පරපුර සූදානම් නැහැ. පෙරට වඩා බෙහෙවින් සංවාදශීලී සමහර විට ආවේගශීලී පොදු අවකාශයක් බිහි වෙමින් තිබෙනවා.

තවමත් දියුණු වෙමින් පවතින ශ්‍රී ලංකාව වැනි රටවල් මුහුණ දෙන ප්‍රධාන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා අභියෝගයක් ද්විත්ව බර ඉසිලීමක් හෙවත් Double Burden ලෙස හැඳින් වෙනවා.

එහි සරල අරුත නම් නැතිබැරිකම් නිසා වැඩිපුරම හට ගන්නා, වළක්වා ගත හැකි බෝවන රෝග එක් පසෙකිනුත්, සාපේක්ෂව වඩාත් ඉසුරුබර ජීවන රටා නිසා හට ගන්නා බෝ නොවන රෝග තවත් පසෙකිනුත් එක වර දරා ගන්නට සෞඛ්‍ය සේවයට සිදු වීමයි.

Dr Palitha Mahipala (left) and Prof Ravindra Fernando

Dr Palitha Mahipala (left) and Prof Ravindra Fernando

බෝ නොවන රෝග වර්ග (Non-communicable Diseases, NCD) මූලික වශයෙන් ප්‍රභේද හතරක් තිබෙනවා: හෘදය රෝග හෙවත් කන්තු‍-වාහිනී ආබාධ (cardiovascular diseases) මුල් තැන ගන්නවා. ඊළඟට පිළිකා රෝගත්, ඉන් පසුව ශ්වසනාබාධ හා දියවැඩියාවත් මිලියන ගණන් ජනයාගේ සෞඛ්‍ය තත්ත්වය දුර්වල කරනවා. අකාලයේ මිය යෑමට හේතු වනවා.

මේ ද්විත්ව බර ගැන මා මුල් වරට විද්‍යා ලිපියක සාකච්ඡා කළේ 1999දී. (Sri Lanka’s Double Burden kills Rich and Poor Alike, May1999). ඒ සඳහා මා උපුටා දැක්වූ එක් විද්වතකු වූයේ ධූලකවේදය පිළිබඳ මහාචාර්ය වෛද්‍ය රවීන්ද්‍ර ප්‍රනාන්දුයි.

1990 දශකයේ සෞඛ්‍ය සංඛ්‍යා ලේඛන විග්‍රහ කරමින් ඔහු කීවේ ප්‍රජා සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා සඳහා එවකට වියදම් කරනු ලැබුවේ සමස්ත සෞඛ්‍ය ප්‍රතිපාදනවලින් 17%ක් පමණක් බවයි. එහෙත් බෝවන රෝග මෙන්ම බෝ නොවන රෝග ද වළක්වා ගැනීමේ ලොකුම විභවය ඇත්තේ ප්‍රජා මට්ටමින් ජනයා දැනුවත් කිරීම හරහායි.

‘ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ අපේක්ෂා කළ හැකි ආයු කාලයන් දිගු වීම සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවන්හි දිගු කාලීන ප්‍රතිඵලයක්. එහෙත් ප්‍රමාද වී මරණයට පත් වීම සැබෑ ජයග්‍රහණයක් වන්නේ ජීවත් වන කාලයේ යහපත් සෞඛ්‍යයෙන් සිටියහොත් පමණයි’ ඔහු පැහැදිලි කළා.

ජීවන රටා හා නොයෙක් පුරුදු හරහා දිගු කාලීනව හට ගන්නා බෝ නොවන නිදන්ගත රෝගාබාධ මතුවීමේ ඉඩකඩ වැඩියෙන් ඇත්තේ වයස්ගත වන විටයි. එහෙත් සමහර බෝ නොවන රෝග දැන් තරුණයන්ට හා ළමුන්ටද හට ගැනීම නිසා සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවන්ට ලොකු පීඩනයක් ඇති කරනවා.

2016දීද අපේ සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවට ද්විත්ව බර තවමත් බලපාන බව වෛද්‍ය මහීපාල කියනවා. එහෙත් ඒ බර දරමින්ම මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය ජයග්‍රහණයන් ලබා ගෙන තිබෙනවා.

සෞඛ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයේ නිතිපතා දත්ත කන්දරාවක් එකතු කැරෙනවා. වාර්ෂිකව සෞඛ්‍ය දත්ත වාර්තාවක් නිකුත් කරනවා. සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශයේ වෙබ් අඩවියෙන් එය ලද හැකියි.

Sri Lanka Annual Health Bulletins http://www.health.gov.lk/moh_final/english/others.php?pid=110

එයට අමතරව සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා වියහියදම් විශ්ලේෂණය කරන ජාතික සෞඛ්‍ය මූල්‍ය වාර්තාවක්ද සම්පාදනය කරනවා : (Sri Lanka National Health Accounts).

Sri Lanka's Per Capita Health Expenditure 2013 – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

Sri Lanka’s Per Capita Health Expenditure 2013 – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

මෑතදී නිකුත් වූ 2013 සෞඛ්‍ය මූල්‍ය වාර්තාවට අනුව එම වසරේ සෞඛ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රය වෙනුවෙන් මෙරට වියදම් කරන ලද සමස්ත මුදල රුපියල් බිලියන් 281ක්. (ප්‍රාග්ධන ආයෝජන බිලියන් 21ක් හා පුනරාවර්තන වියදම් බිලියන් 260ක් ඇතුළත්.) මේ සමස්තය රටේ දළ ජාතික නිෂ්පාදිතයෙන් 3.2%ක් වනවා.

මේ කතා කරන්නේ රටේ සමස්ත සෞඛ්‍ය වියදම් ගැනයි. එයට රාජ්‍ය හා පෞද්ගලික දෙඅංශයේම සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා ඇතුළත්.

පුනරාවර්තන සෞඛ්‍ය වියදම් රු. බිලියන් 260න් සියයට 55%ක් රජය (එනම් මහජනයාගෙන්ම එකතු කර ගත් බදු මුදල්වලින්) දරන ලද අතර ඉතිරි 45% රක්ෂන ක්‍රම මගින්, සේව්‍යයන් විසින්, පුන්‍යායතන හරහා හෝ පුරවැසියන් ඍජුවම ගෙවා තිබෙනවා.

2013දී බෝ නොවන රෝග සඳහා සමස්ත සෞඛ්‍ය වියදමින් 35%ක් යොමු වී තිබෙනවා. බෝවන රෝග මර්දනයට හා ප්‍රතිකාරවලට 22%ක් වැය වුණා.

සාම්ප්‍රදායික හා විකල්ප ප්‍රතිකාර ක්‍රමවලට වැය කර ඇත්තේ බිලියන් 2.3ක් පමණයි. බහුතරයක් ප්‍රතිපාදන ලැබූ බටහිර වෛද්‍ය ක්‍රමයේ වුවද 91%ක් රෝග ප්‍රතිකාර සඳහා වැයවූ අතර වළක්වා ගැනීමට වැය කළේ 4.5%ක් පමණයි.

සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා සඳහා රජය වැය කරන ප්‍රමාණය දළ ජාතික නිෂ්පාදනයෙන් 2%ක් පමණ වනවා. මෙය ඉදිරි දෙවසර තුළ 3% දක්වා වැඩි කිරීමට රජයට වුවමනා බව වෛද්‍ය මහීපාල කියනවා.

Distribution of Sri Lanka's current health expenditure 2013 by Broader Categories of illnesses (LKR million, %) – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

Distribution of Sri Lanka’s current health expenditure 2013 by Broader Categories of illnesses (LKR million, %) – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

2005-2016 අතර දශකය තුළ සෞඛ්‍ය ප්‍රතිපාදන 9 ගුණයකින් ඉහළ ගොස් ඇති බවත්, මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය සේවයේ ගුණාත්මක බව නැංවීම ප්‍රධාන ඉලක්කයක් බවත් ඔහු සඳහන් කළා.

සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාවේ අඩුපාඩු දකින්නෝ එහි ඵලදායීතාව ඇති තරම් නොදැකීම කනගාටුවට කරුණක්.

සෞඛ්‍යයට කරන සමස්ත වියදම සුවිසල් සේ පෙනුණත් 2013දී එක් පුරවැසියකුට කරන ලද සාමාන්‍ය වියදම රු. 12,636යි. අපට සමාන සෞඛ්‍ය දර්ශක ලබාගැනීම සඳහා වෙනත් බොහෝ රටවල මීට වඩා බෙහෙවින් වියදම් කරන බව වෛද්‍ය මහීපාල පෙන්වා දෙනවා.

රටේ පුනරාවර්තන සෞඛ්‍ය වියදමින් 24%ක්ම බෙහෙත්වලට වැය වීම අවධානයට ලක් විය යුත්තක්ග අත්‍යවශ්‍ය බෙහෙත් ප්‍රතිපත්තිය නිසි ලෙස ක්‍රියාත්මක කිරීමෙන් මෙය සීමා කර ගත හැකියි.

එසේම ඉදිරි වසරවලදී අධ්‍යාපනයට හා මහජන දැනුවත් කිරීම්වලට වැඩි ප්‍රමුඛත්වයක් දීම අවශ්‍යයි.

වැඩියෙන් රෝහල් ඉදි කර, නව තාක්ෂණය භාවිතයට ගත්තාට පමණක් මදි. ශාරීරික හා මානසික සුවතාවය රටේ සැමට ලබා දීමට තව කළ යුතු බොහෝ දේ තිබෙනවා. රජය හා සමාජය මේ වෙනුවන් අත්වැල් බැද ගත යුතුයි.

Distribution of CHE 2013 according to different Health Care Functions (LKR millions, %) – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

Distribution of CHE 2013 according to different Health Care Functions (LKR millions, %) – Source: National Health Accounts 2013

Posted in children, Communicating development, Health, HIV/AIDS, Poverty, public interest, Ravaya Column, South Asia, Sri Lanka, Sustainable Development, United Nations, women, youth. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »