Going beyond “Poor Journalism” that ignores the poor

Sri Lankan Media Fellows on Poverty and Development with their mentors and CEPA coordinators at orientation workshop in Colombo, 24 Sep 2016

Sri Lankan Media Fellows on Poverty and Development with their mentors and CEPA coordinators at orientation workshop in Colombo, 24 Sep 2016

“For me as an editor, there is a compelling case for engaging with poverty. Increasing education and literacy is related to increasing the size of my readership. Our main audiences are indeed drawn from the middle classes, business and policymakers. But these groups cannot live in isolation. The welfare of the many is in the interests of the people who read the Daily Star.”

So says Mahfuz Anam, Editor and Publisher of The Daily Star newspaper in Bangladesh. I quoted him in my presentation to the orientation workshop for Media Fellows on Poverty and Development, held in Colombo on 24 September 2016.

Alas, many media gatekeepers in Sri Lanka and across South Asia don’t share Anam’s broad view. I can still remember talking to a Singaporean manager of one of Sri Lanka’s first private TV stations in the late 1990s. He was interested in international development related TV content, he told me, “but not depressing and miserable stuff about poverty – our viewers don’t want that!”

Most media, in Sri Lanka and elsewhere, have narrowly defined poverty negatively. Those media that occasionally allows some coverage of poverty mostly skim a few selected issues, doing fleeting reporting on obvious topics like street children, beggars or poverty reduction assistance from the government. The complexity of poverty and under-development is hardly investigated or captured in the media.

Even when an exceptional journalist ventures into exploring these issues in some depth and detail, their media products also often inadvertently contain society’s widespread stereotyping on poverty and inequality. For example:

  • Black and white images are used when colour is easily available (as if the poor live in B&W).
  • Focus is mostly or entirely on the rural poor (never mind many poor people now live in cities and towns).

The Centre for Poverty Analysis (CEPA), a non-profit think tank has launched the Media Fellowship Programme on Poverty and Development to inspire and support better media coverage of these issues. The programme is co-funded by UNESCO and CEPA.

Under this, 20 competitively selected journalists – drawn from print, broadcast and web media outlets in Sinhala, Tamil and English languages – are to be given a better understanding of the many dimensions of poverty.

These Media Fellows will have the opportunity to research and produce a story of their choice in depth and detail, but on the understanding that their media outlet will carry their story. Along the way, they will benefit from face-to-face interactions with senior journalists and development researchers, and also receive a grant to cover their field visit costs.

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at orientation workshop for Media Fellows on Poverty and Development at CEPA, 24 Sep 2016

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at orientation workshop for Media Fellows on Poverty and Development at CEPA, 24 Sep 2016

I am part of the five member expert panel guiding these Media Fellows. Others on the panel are senior journalist and political commentator Kusal Perera; Chief Editor of Daily Express newspaper Hana Ibrahim; Chief Editor of Echelon biz magazine Shamindra Kulamannage; and Consultant Editor of Sudar Oli newspaper, Arun Arokianathan.

At the orientation workshop, Shamindra Kulamannage and I both made presentations on media coverage of poverty. Mine was a broad-sweep exploration of the topic, with many examples and insights from having been in media and development spheres for over 25 years.

Here is my PPT:

More photos from the orientation workshop:

 

 

Details of CEPA Media Fellowship Programme on Poverty and Development

List of 20 Media Fellows on Poverty and Development

ආපදා අවස්ථාවල මානුෂික ආධාර එකතු කිරීම හා බෙදීම මාධ්‍යවලට සුදුසුද? එසේ කළත් ඒ ගැන පම්පෝරි ගැසීම හරිද?

Disaster reporting, Sri Lanka TV style! Cartoon by Dasa Hapuwalana, Lankadeepa

Disaster reporting, Sri Lanka TV style! Cartoon by Dasa Hapuwalana, Lankadeepa

ආපදා අවස්ථාවල මාධ්‍යවලට ලොකු වගකීම් සමුදායක් හා තීරණාත්මක කාර්යභාරයක් හිමි වනවා. ඉතාම වැදගත් හා ප්‍රමුඛ වන්නේ සිදුවීම් නිවැරදිව හා නිරවුල්ව වාර්තා කිරීම. වුණේ මොකක්ද, වෙමින් පවතින්නේ කුමක්ද යන්න සරලව රටට තේරුම් කර දීම. එයට රාජ්‍ය, විද්වත් හා ස්වේච්ඡා ආයතනවල තොරතුරු හා විග්‍රහයන් යොදා ගත හැකියි.

ඉන් පසු වැදගත්ම කාරිය ආපදා ප්‍රතිචාරයට හැකි උපරිම ආවරණය සැපයීම. මෙයට බේරා ගැනීම්, තාවකාලික රැකවරණ, ආධාර බෙදා හරින ක්‍රම හා තැන්, ලෙඩරෝග පැතිරයාම ගැන අනතුරු ඇගවීම් ආදිය ඇතුළත්.

ආපදා කළමනාකරණය හා සමාජසේවා ගැන නිල වගකීම් ලත් රාජ්‍ය ආයතන මෙන්ම හමුදාවත්, රතු කුරුසය හා සර්වෝදය වැනි මහා පරිමාන ස්වේච්ඡා ආයතනත් පශ්චාත් ආපදා වකවානුවල ඉමහත් සේවයක් කරනවා. මාධ්‍යවලට කළ හැකි ලොකුම මෙහෙවර මේ සැවොම කරන කියන දේ උපරිම ලෙස සමාජගත් කිරීමයි. ඊට අමතරව අඩුපාඩු හා කිසියම් දූෂණ ඇත්නම් තහවුරු කරගත් තොරතුරු මත ඒවා වාර්තා කිරීමයි.

මේ සියල්ල කළ පසු මාධ්‍ය තමන් ආධාර එකතු කොට බෙදීමට යොමු වුණාට කමක් නැතැයි මා සිතනවා. එතැනදීත් තම වාර්තාකරණය සමස්ත ආපදා ප්‍රතිචාරය ගැන මිස තමන්ගේම සමාජ සත්කාරය හුවා දැක්වීමට නොකළ යුතුයි.

මාධ්‍ය සන්නාම ප්‍රවර්ධනයට ආපදා අවස්ථා යොදා ගැනීම නීති විරෝධී නොවූවත් සදාචාර විරෝධීයි. රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය කළත්, පුද්ගලික මාධ්‍ය කළත් වැඩේ වැරදියි.

සිවුමංසල කොලුගැටයා #285: ඩ්‍රෝන් තාක්ෂණය දැන් ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ. අප එයට සූදානම් ද?

Drones are coming: Are we ready?

Drones are coming: Are we ready?

For some, drones still conjure images of death and destruction – that has been their most widely reported use. But that reality is fast changing. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are being used for many peaceful purposes, from newsgathering and post-disaster assessments to goods delivery and smart farming.

Drones come in various shapes and sizes: as miniature fixed-wing airplanes or, more commonly, quadcopters and other multi-bladed small helicopters. All types are getting simpler, cheaper and more versatile.

Unlike radio-controlled model aircraft, which aviation hobbyists have used for decades, UAVs are equipped with an autopilot using GPS and a camera controlled by the autopilot. These battery operated flying machines can be manually controlled or pre-programmed for an entire, low altitude flight.

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala, appearing in the print issue of 25 Sep 2016), I survey the many civilian applications of drones – and the legal, ethical and technical challenges they pose.

Drones are already being used in Sri Lanka by photographers, TV journalists and political parties but few seem to respect public safety or privacy of individuals.

I quote Sanjana Hattotuwa, a researcher and activist on ICTs, who in August 2016 conducted Sri Lanka’s first workshop on drone journalism which I attended. I agree with his view: drones are here to stay, and are going to be used in many applications. So the sooner we sort out public safety and privacy concerns, the better for all.

See also my article in English (NOT a translation): Drones are coming: Are we ready? (Echelon magazine, Oct 2016)

Sanjana Hattotuwa showing drone operating controls to a participant at Sri Lanka's first journalists workshop on the topic - Mt Lavinia, Aug 2016

Sanjana Hattotuwa showing drone operating controls to a participant at Sri Lanka’s first journalists workshop on the topic – Mt Lavinia, Aug 2016

සිවිල් යුද්ධ සමයේ ශ්‍රී ලංකා ගුවන් හමුදාව ඔත්තු බැලීමට යොදා ගත් ”කේලමා” ඔබට මතක ද?

”කේලමා” කියා නම පටබැඳුණේ නියමුවකු රහිතව ගුවන්ගත කොට දුරස්ථව ක්‍රියාත්මක කළ හැකි කුඩා ගුවන් යානයකට. කැමරා සවි කළ එය යම් තැනකට ගුවනින් යවා, හසුරුවා බිම ඡායාරූප ගත හැකි වුණා.

මේ යානා හඳුන්වන්නේ UAV (unmanned aerial vehicles) හෙවත් ඩ්‍රෝන් (drones) නමින්.

ඩ්‍රෝන් මුලින්ම නිපදවා යොදා ගනු ලැබුවේ මිලිටරි වැඩවලට. ඔත්තු බලන්නට පමණක් නෙවෙයි. දුර සිට යම් ඉලක්කයන්ට පහර දෙන්නට අවි ගෙන යා හැකි ඩ්‍රෝන් ද තිබෙනවා.

ඇෆ්ගනිස්ථානයේ හා පාකිස්ථානයේ අමෙරිකානු හමුදා ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගෙන ත්‍රස්ත ඉලක්කවලට පහරදීමේදී නිතරම පාහේ අහිංසක නිරායුධ වැසියන්ද මිය යනවා. තුවාල ලබනවා.

එහෙත් අද වන විට සාමකාමී භාවිතයන් රැසකට ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගැනීම ඇරඹිලා. බඩු ප්‍රවාහනයට, ආපදා හදිසි තක්සේරුවලට, ඡායාරූපකරණයට හා මාධ්‍යකරණයට ආදී වශයෙන්.

අප සමහරුන් කැමති වුණත්, නැති වුණත් ඩ්‍රෝන් තාක්ෂණය ලංකාවටත් ඇවිල්ලා!

දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයට ඩ්‍රෝන් හරහා ලබා ගත් වීඩියෝ හා ඡායාරූප යොදා ගැනීම ගිය වසරේ මහ මැතිවරණයේදී දක්නට ලැබුනා. මේ අතින් රාජපක්ෂ සන්නිවේදක කණ්ඩායම ඉදිරියෙන් සිටිනු පෙනෙනවා.

කොස්ගම සාලාව අවි ගබඩාව පුපුරා ගිය පසු එහි විනාශයේ තරම හරිහැටි පෙන්වන්න සමහර ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා ඩ්‍රෝන් මාර්ගයෙන් ගත් දර්ශන සාර්ථකව යොදා ගත්තා.

වියදම් අධික හෙලිකොප්ටර් භාවිත නොකර ගුවනින් යමක් පෙනෙන හැටි බලා ගන්න ලෙහෙසිම හා ලාබම ක්‍රමය මෙයයිග මූලික වියදමින් පසු නඩත්තු වියදම වන්නේ විදුලියෙන් බැටරි චාජ් කිරීම පමණයි.

අප මෙහිදී drone යනුවෙන් අදහස් කරන්නේ නියමුවන් රහිත, ස්වයංක්‍රීය කුඩා ගුවන්යානාවලට. මෙයට තවම සිංහල යෙදුමක් නැති නිසා ඩ්‍රෝන් යැයිම කියමු.

ගුවන්යානා තාක්ෂණය තරම්ව වාගේ දිගු ඉතිහාසයක් ඩ්‍රෝන් තාක්ෂණයට තිබෙනවා. 1903දී රයිට් සොහොයුරුන් නිපද වූ ගුවන්යානය වසර කිහිපයක් තුළ මිලිටරි භාවිතයන්ට යොදා ගත් අතර නියමුවන් අවදානමකට ලක් නොකර ස්වයංක්‍රීය ගුවන්යානා හරහා ඔත්තු බලන්නේ හා ප්‍රහාර දෙන්නේ කෙසේද යන්න 1920 පමණ පටන් විවිධ හමුදා අත්හදා බැලුවා.

මිලිටරි තාක්ෂණය තුළට මෑතක් වන තුරු සීමා වී තිබූ ඩ්‍රෝන්, සිවිල් ජන භාවිතයට ප්‍රචලිත වූයේ ජංගම දුරකථන කර්මාන්තය නිසයි. ස්මාට්ෆෝන් සඳහා දියුණු කරන ලද දෘෂ්ටිමය, පරිඝණකමය හා සන්නිවේදන උපාංග ඩ්‍රෝන්වලටද යොදා ගැනීම හරහා ඒවායේ මිළ සීඝ්‍රයෙන් පහත බැස තිබෙනවා.

අපේ අවධානය නිරායුධ වූත්, නියමුවන් රහිත වූත් ඩ්‍රෝන් යානා (unmanned and unarmed aerial vehicles) සාමකාමී භාවිතයන්ට යොදා ගැනීම ගැනයි.

මීට වසර කිහිපයකට පෙර ඩොලර් දහස් ගණනක් (රුපියල් ලක්ෂ ගණනක්) මිළ වූ ඩ්‍රෝන් අද වන විට මිළෙන් අඩු වී, තාක්ෂණික හැකියාවෙන් වැඩි වී විවිධ සමත්කම් ඇති යන්ත්‍ර පරාසයක් බවට පත්ව තිබෙනවා.

අද වන විට සංකීර්ණත්වයෙන් අඩු ඩ්‍රෝන් රුපියල් 35,000 – 40,000 අතර මිළකට කොළඹ විකිණෙනවා. වඩාත් හැකියාවන්  ඇති ඩ්‍රෝන් (උදා – Phantom IV) මේ වන විට රු. 180,000ක් පමණ වනවා.

මේවා බොහොමයක් අලෙවි කැරෙන්නේ සෙල්ලම් බඩු (electronic toys)  ලෙසයි. විදෙස්ගතව මෙහි එන අයට මීටත් වඩා අඩු මිළකට ඩ්‍රෝන ගෙන ආ හැකියි. එසේ මෙරටට ගෙන ඒමට කිසිදු තහනමක් නැහැ.

එහෙත් රටට ගෙනැවිත් භාවිත කරන විට මෑතදී හඳුන්වා දී ඇති සිවිල් ගුවන් සේවා ප්‍රමිතීන් හා නියාමනවලට අනුකූල විය යුතුයි.

තාක්ෂණය ලබා ගත්තට මදි. එය නිර්මාණශීලිව භාවිත කළ යුතුයි. එසේම එහිදී නීතිමය හා ආචාර ධර්මීය රාමුවක් තුළ ඩ්‍රෝන හැසිරවීම වැදගත්.

නව මාධ්‍ය හා නව තාක්ෂණයන් සමාජගත වීම ගැන පර්යේෂණ කරන සංජන හත්තොටුව, UAV සාමකාමී භාවිතය ගැන කලක සිට ගවේෂණය කරන්නෙක්. විශේෂයෙන්ම මානවහිතවාදී (humanitarian) ක්‍රියා සඳහාත්, ආපදාවලින් පසු කඩිනම් ප්‍රතිචාර දැක්වීමේදීත් ඩ්‍රෝන් කෙසේ යොදා ගත හැකිද යන්න ගැන ඔහු වසර කිහිපයකට සිට ජාත්‍යන්තර මට්ටමින් දැනුම ගවේෂණය කරනවා.

Peacekeepers in the Sky

Peacekeepers in the Sky

2015 සැප්තැම්බරයේ ICT4Peace Foundation නම් ආයතනය පළ කළ මේ පිළිබඳ විද්වත් පොතකට (Peacekeepers in the Sky: The Use of Unmanned Unarmed Aerial Vehicles for Peacekeeping) පෙරවදන ලියමින් සංජන මෙසේ කියනවා:

”මානහිතවාදී ආධාර ආයතනත්, පෞද්ගලික සමාගමුත් නිරායුධ ඩ්‍රෝන්වලින් විවිධ ප්‍රයෝජන ගන්නා සැටි අත්හදා බලනවා. ඒ අතර සාමයට ළැදි ක්‍රියාකාරීකයන් සහ පර්යේෂකයන් තැත් කරන්නේ යුධ අවියක් ලෙස වඩා ප්‍රකට වූ මේ තාක්ෂණය සාමය තහවුරු කරන්නත්, සාමකාමී භාවිතයන්ටත් විවිධාකාරයෙන් යොදා ගන්නයි.”

ඔහු කියන්නේ ඩ්‍රෝන් තව දුරටත් පර්යේෂණාත්මක මට්ටමට සීමා නොවී එදිනෙදා භාවිතයන්ට පිවිස ඇති බවයි.

ගුවන් තාක්ෂණයේ යොදා ගන්නා ඉලෙක්ට්‍රොනික් (avionics), වඩාත් දියුණු බැටරි හා  කැමරා තාක්ෂණයන් ආදිය ඒකරාශී කරමින් වැඩි වේලාවක් ගුවන්ගතව සිටිය හැකි වූත්, විවිධ සැරිසැරීම් සඳහා  ප්‍රෝග්‍රෑම් කළ හැකි වූත් ඩ්‍රෝන බිහි වී තිබෙනවා.

”අද වන විට ලොව බොහෝ රටවල පොදු කටයුතු සඳහා ඩ්‍රෝන් පාවිච්චි කරනවා. වනජීවී හා වනාන්තර නිරීක්ෂණයට, පොලිස් ආවේක්ෂණ ක්‍රියාවලට, (ගොඩබිම්)  දේශසීමා අධික්ෂණයට, ගොවිතැන්වල උදව්වලට හා චිත්‍රපට නිෂ්පාදනයට ආදී වශයෙන්. එහෙත් නිිසි වගකීමකින් යුතුව, මනා නියාමනයක් සහිතව ඩ්‍රෝන් භාවිත නොකළොත් එයින් යහපතට වඩා අයහපතක් වීමට ඉඩ තිබෙනවා.” සංජන කියනවා.

උදාහරණයක් ලෙස මාධ්‍යකරණය සඳහා ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගැනීම සළකා බලමු.

මෙරට සමහර ටෙලිවිෂන් ආයතන එළිමහන් දර්ශන වීඩියෝ කිරීමට ඒවා යොදා ගන්නවා. මගුල් ඡායාරූප ශිල්පීන්, වනජීවි හා සොබා ඡායාරූප ශිල්පීන් මින් පෙර නොතිබූ ගුවන් දැක්මක් ලබා ගන්නට ද ඩ්‍රෝන්ගත කැමරා භාවිත කරනවා.

මහජන පෙළපාළි, රැස්වීම්, පෙරහැර ආදී අවස්ථාවල ජනකාය හා ක්‍රියාකාරකම් ගැන අමුතු දෘෂ්ටිකෝණයක් ලබන්නට ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගැනීම ඇරඹිලා.

නමුත් මේ කී දෙනෙක් සුපරීක්ෂාකාරීව හා ආචාරධර්මීය ලෙසින් ඩ්‍රෝන් භවිත කරනවාද?

Fromer President Mahinda Rajapaksa visited the landslides victims at Arnayake in Kegalle on 20 May 2016 - Drone Photo

Fromer President Mahinda Rajapaksa visited the landslides victims at Arnayake in Kegalle on 20 May 2016 – Drone Photo

මෑතකදී කොච්චිකඩේ ශාන්ත අන්තෝනි මංගල්‍යයේදී එය රූපගත කළ ඩ්‍රෝන් ඉතා පහළින් ගමන් කළ බව වාර්තා වූණා. මෙහිදී මහජන ආරක්ෂාව පිළිබඳ ප්‍රශ්නයක් මතු වනවා. ජනාකීර්ණ තැනක පියාසර කරන ඩ්‍රෝන් හදිසියේ ඇද වැටුණොත් යම් අයට තුවාල විය හැකියි. ඒවා අධි බලැති විදුලි සම්ප්‍රේෂණ රැහැන්වල ගැටී අනතුරු සිදු කිරීමට ද හැකියි.

(විශේෂ ආරක්ෂිත ස්ථාන හැර) පොදු ස්ථානවල ඡායාරූප හා විඩියෝගත කිරීමට සාමකාමී රටක අවකාශය තිබිය යුතුයි. එහෙත් පෞද්ගලික නිවාස, කාර්යාල ආදියට ඉහළින් පියාසර කරමින් ඒ තුළ ඇති දර්ශන රූපගත කිරීම මඟින් පුරවැසියන්ගේ පෞද්ගලිකත්වය (privacy) උල්ලංඝනය වනවා.

රේඩියෝ තරංග හරහා දුරස්ථව පාලනය කරන සියලු උපකරණ සඳහා විදුලි සංදේශ නියාමන කොමිසමේ අනුමැතිය අවශ්‍යයි. එහෙත් ඔවුන් අධීක්ෂණ සීමා වන්නේ නිසි සංඛ්‍යාත භාවිතයට පමණයි.

2016 පෙබරවාරියේදී සිවිල් ගුවන්සේවා අධිකාරිය මෙරට UAV/ඩ්‍රෝන්  භාවිතය ගැන ප්‍රමිතීන් හා මග පෙන්වීම් සිය වෙබ් අඩවියේ ප්‍රකාශයට පත් කළා. http://www.caa.lk/images/stories/pdf/implementing_standards/sn053.pdf

මේ දක්වා ඉංග්‍රීසියෙන් පමණක් ඇති මේ ලේඛනයට අනුව කිලෝග්‍රෑම් 1ට වඩා බරින් අඩු ඩ්‍රෝන් සඳහා ලියාපදිංචියක් අවශ්‍ය නැහැ. එහෙත් ඒවා භාවිත කළ හැක්කේ විනෝදය හෝ අධ්‍යාපනික අරමුණු සඳහා යම් පෞද්ගලික ස්ථානයක එහි හිමිකරුගේ අනුමැතිය සහිතව, හා පොදු ස්ථානවල පමණයි. මෙකී ස්ථාන දෙවර්ගයේම මහජන සුරක්ෂිතබව හා දේපල  සුරක්ෂිත බවට අවධානය යොමු කළ යුතු යැයි කියැවෙනවා.

ක්‍රිලෝග්‍රෑම් 1 -25 අතර බර ඇති ඩ්‍රෝන් භාවිතයට සිවිල් ගුවන් සේවා අධිකාරිය සමඟ ලියාපදිංචි විය යුතුයි. එවන් ඩ්‍රෝන් පියාසර කිරීම සිදු කළ යුත්තේ සිවිල් ගුවන්සේවා අධ්‍යක්ෂ ජනරාල්ගේ අනුමැතිය සහිතව පමණයි.

එසේම සියලු ඩ්‍රෝන්වල එහි හිමිකරුගේ ජාතික හැඳුනුම්පත් අංකය හා දුරකථන අංකය සටහන් කර තිබිය යුතු වනවා. මීට අමතරව ඩ්‍රෝනයට විශේෂිත අංකයක්ද එය නිපදවන විටම එයට ලබා දී තිබෙනවා.

වාණිජ අරමුණු සඳහා ඩ්‍රෝන් භාවිත කරන විට ඒ සඳහා අධිකාරීයේ ලිඛිත අවසරයක් ලැබිය යුතු අතර එයට යම් ගෙවීමක් ද කළ යුතුයි.

Sanjana Hattotuwa demostrating a drone at drone journalism workshop

Sanjana Hattotuwa demostrating a drone at drone journalism workshop

සෑම විටම ඩ්‍රෝන් හසුරවන්නා සිය ඩ්‍රෝනය ඇසට පෙනෙන මානයේ (line of sight) තබා ගත යුතු බවත්, ඩ්‍රෝනය ගමන් කරන පරිසරය මනාව නිරීක්ෂණය කළ හැකි තැනෙක සිට එය කළ යුතු බවත් අධිකාරීය අවධාරණය කරනවා.

”අපේ රටේ ප්‍රසිද්ධ ස්ථානවල රූපගත කරද්දී දේශපාලන පක්ෂ සැමෙකක්ම මේ සිවිල් ගුවන්සේවා ප්‍රමිතීන් උල්ලංඝනය කරනවා.” යැයි සංජන කියනවා.

වඩාත් සංකීර්ණ ඩ්‍රෝන් තුළ ඇති පරිගණක පද්ධතියට ලෝකයේ සියලු ගුවන්තොටුපළවල පිහිටීම් දත්ත (location data) කවා තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා ගුවන්තොටුපළක් ආසන්නයේ ඒවා පියාසර කිරීම ඉබේම වැළකෙනවාග

එහෙත් චීනයෙන් එන ලාභ ඩ්‍රෝන් සැම එකකම මේ  ආරක්ෂිත විවිධිධානය නොතිබිය හැකියි.

රාත්‍රියේ ඩ්‍රෝන් පැදවීම හා ඩ්‍රෝන් අතර තරඟ රේස් යාමද සිවිල් ගුවන්සේවා අධිකාරීය අවසර නොදෙන තවත් ක්‍රියාවන් දෙකක්. කෙසේ වෙතත් දැනට වෙළදපොලේ ඇති කිසිදු ඩ්‍රෝනයකට රාත්‍රී පෙනීම නැහැ.

මාධ්‍යකරණයට ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගන්න විටත් මෙකී ප්‍රමිතීන් හා නියාමන සියල්ල අදාළයි. එහෙත් ඉන් ඔබ්බට යන ආචාර ධර්මීය රාමුවක් තුළ පමණක් මාධ්‍යකරුවන් ඩ්‍රෝන් හරහා රූප රැස් කළ යුතුයි.

ඩ්‍රෝන් කියන්නේ සරුංගල් මෙන් අහිංසක සරල උපාංගයක් නොවෙයි. ඉතා ඉහළ රූපමය අගයක් ^image resolution) සහිත විඩියෝ හා ඡායාරූප ගැනීමේ හැකියාව ඇති නිසා ඩ්‍රෝන් මිනිසුන්ගේ පෞද්ගලික ජීවිතවලට අනවසරයෙන් එබී බලන්නට හොඳටම ඉඩ තිබෙනවා.

අධිකාරීයේ ප්‍රමිතීන්ට අනුව පෞද්ගලික ඉඩම් උඩින් හිමිකරුවන්ගේ අවසරයෙන් තොරව ඩ්‍රෝන් පියාසර කරන්නට ඉඩ නැහැ.

”යම් කාලීන සිදුවීමක පරිමාණය ගැන ඉක්මනින් හොඳ අවබෝධයක් ලබා දීමට ඩ්‍රෝන් හරහා ලබා ගන්න රූප මාධ්‍යවලට ඉතා ප්‍රයෝජනවත් වනවා. එහෙත් තරඟකාරී මාධ්‍ය කර්මාන්තයේදී මහජන සුරක්ෂිතබව හා සියලු දෙනාගේ පෞද්ගලිකත්වය රැකෙන පරිදි පමණක් එවන් රූප ලබා ගැනීම ඉතා වැදගත්,” යයි සංජන අවධාරණය කරනවා.

යුද්ධ කාලේ කේලමා කළ ඔත්තු බලන වැඩ සාමකාමී අද කාලේ හිතුමතයට ඕනෑ කෙනකුට කිරීමට ඉඩ නොතිබිය යුතුයි.

 තම නිවාස හා කාර්යාල තුළ තමන්ගේ පාඩුවේ සිටීමට කාටත් අයිතියක් තිබෙනවා. මෙය අතික්‍රමණය කිරීමට ඩ්‍රෝන්වලට ඉඩ දිය නොහැකියි.

ඩ්‍රෝනයක් හැසිරවීම සඳහා යම් අවම හැකියාවක් හා සංයමයක් අවශ්‍යයි. මේ වන විට ළමයින් පවා ඩ්‍රෝන් පාලනය කරනු මා දැක තිබෙනවා. එය සංකීර්ණ ක්‍රියාවක් නොවූවත් සංයමය නැති වූවොත් අනතුරු සිදු විය හැකියි.

ඩ්‍රෝන් නිසි පරිදි භාවිතය ගැන මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ට මෙරට පැවැත්වූ මූල්ම වැඩමුළුවට මීට සති කිහිපයකට පෙර මාද සහභාගි වූණා. ඉන්ටර්නිවුස් ආයතනය වෙනුවෙන් ගල්කිස්සේ පැවති එය මෙහෙයවූයේ සංජන හත්තොටුවයි.

ඩ්‍රෝන් භාවිතය මෙරට රාජ්‍ය, පෞද්ගලික හා විද්වත් ක්ෂේත්‍ර හැම එකකම කෙමෙන් මතුව එනවා. මිනින්දෝරු දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව හා ජාත්‍යන්තර ජල කළමනාකරණ පර්යේෂණායතනය (IWMI) දැනටමත් ප්‍රායෝගීකව ඩ්‍රෝන් යොදා ගන්නවා. ගොවිතැනට ඩ්‍රෝන් හරහා නව දත්ත සේවාවක් හඳුන්වා දෙන බව CIC සමාගම 2016 අගෝස්තුවේ ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

ඩ්‍රෝන් භාවිතය වැඩිවත්ම අපේ සමහරු ඒවා ගැනත් භීතිකාවක් පැතිරවිය හැකියි. ඩ්‍රෝන් තාක්ෂණයේ නිසි ඵල නෙළා ගන්නා අතර ඒවා ප්‍රවේශමින්, ආචාර ධර්මීයව හා නිසි නියාමන රාමුවක් තුළ භාවිතයයි අවශ්‍ය වන්නේ.

ඇත්තටම සිවිල් ගුවන්සේවා අධිකාරීයේ ප්‍රමිතීන් ගැන බොහෝ දෙනා තවම දන්නේ නැහැ. ඉංග්‍රීසියෙන් පවා මේවා ලියා ඇත්තේ අතිශ්‍ය නීතිමය බසකින්. එය සරලව මෙරට භාවිත වන තිබසින්ම සමාජගත කිරීම හදිසි අවශ්‍යතාවක්.

Journalists getting used to drone control unit at Sri Lanka's first workshop on drone journalism, Aug 2016

Journalists getting used to drone control unit at Sri Lanka’s first workshop on drone journalism, Aug 2016

 

[Op-ed] Investigative Journalists uncover Asia, one story at a time

Op-ed written for Sri Lanka’s Weekend Express newspaper, 23 September 2016

Investigative Journalists uncover Asia, one story at a time

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference: Kathmandu, Nepal, 23-25 September 2016

Second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference: Kathmandu, Nepal, 23-25 September 2016

The second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference in opens in Kathmandu, Nepal, on September 23.

Themed as ‘Uncovering Asia’ it is organized jointly by the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN), Centre for Investigative Journalism in Nepal, and the German foundation Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (2016.uncoveringasia.org).

Founded in 2003, GIJN is the world’s leading international association of investigative reporters’ and their organizations. Its membership includes more than 100 non-profits and NGOs in 45 countries. They are committed to expanding and supporting quality investigative journalism worldwide. This is done through sponsoring global and regional conferences, including the every-two-year Global Investigative Journalism Conference. GIJN also does training, links journalists together worldwide, and promotes best practices in investigative and data journalism.

For three days in Kathmandu, reporters from across Asia and beyond – including several from Sri Lanka – will swap stories, cheer each other, and take stock of their particular craft.

It is true that all good journalism should be investigative as well as reflective. Journalism urges its practitioners to follow the money and power — two factors that often lead to excesses and abuses.

At the same time, investigative journalism (IJ) is actually a specialized genre of the profession of journalism. It is where reporters deeply investigate a single topic of public interest — such as serious crimes, political corruption, or corporate wrongdoing. In recent years, probing environmental crimes, human smuggling, and sporting match fixing have joined IJ’s traditional topics.

Investigative journalists may spend months or years researching and preparing a report (or documentary). They would consult eye witnesses, subject experts and lawyers to get their story exactly right. In some cases, they would also have to withstand extreme pressures exerted by the party being probed.

This process is illustrated in the Academy award winning Hollywood movie ‘Spotlight’ (2015). It is based on The Boston Globe‘s investigative coverage of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. The movie reconstructs how a small team systematically amassed and analyzed evidence for months before going public.

Spotlight: investigative journalism at work

Spotlight: investigative journalism at work

Nosing Not Easy

Investigative journalism is not for the faint-hearted. But it epitomizes, perhaps more than anything else, the public interest value of an independent media.

The many challenges investigative journalists face was a key topic at the recent International Media Conference of the Hawaii-based East-West Center, held in New Delhi, India, from 8 to 11 September 2016.

In mature democracies, freedom of expression and media freedoms are constitutionally guaranteed and respected in practice (well, most of the time). That creates an enabling environment for whistle-blowers and journalists to probe various stories in the public interest.

Many Asian investigative journalists don’t have that luxury. They persist amidst uncaring (or repressive) governments, intimidating wielders of authority, unpredictable judicial mechanisms and unsupportive publishers. They often risk their jobs, and sometimes life and limb, in going after investigative stories.

Yet, as participants and speakers in Delhi confirmed, and those converging in Kathmandu this week will no doubt demonstrate, investigative journalism prevails. It even thrives when indefatigable journalists are backed by exceptionally courageous publishers.

Delhi conference panel: investigative journalists share experiences on how they probed Panama Papers

Delhi conference panel: investigative journalists share experiences on how they probed Panama Papers

Cross-border Probing

 As capital and information flows have become globalized, so has investigative journalism. Today, illicit money, narcotics, exotic animals and illegal immigrants crisscross political borders all the time. Journalists following such stories simply have to step beyond their own territories to get the bigger picture.

Here, international networking helps like-nosed journalists. The Delhi conference showcased the Panama Papers experience as reaffirming the value of cross-border collaboration.

Panama Papers involved a giant “leak” of more than 11.5 million financial and legal records exposing an intricate system that enables crime, corruption and wrongdoing, all hidden behind secretive offshore companies.

This biggest act of whistle blowing in history contained information on some 214,488 offshore entities. The documents had all been created by Panamanian law firm and corporate service provider Mossack-Fonseca since the 1970s.

A German newspaper, Süddeutsche Zeitung, originally received the leaked data. Because of its massive volume, it turned to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), a Washington-anchored but globally distributed network of journalists from over 60 countries who collaborate in probing cross-border crimes, corruption and the accountability of power.

Coordinated by ICIJ, journalists from 107 media organizations in 80 countries analyzed the Panama Papers. They were sworn to secrecy and worked on a collective embargo. Within that framework, each one was free to pursue local angles on their own.

After more than one year of analysis and verifications, the news stories were first published on 3 April 2016 simultaneously in participating newspapers worldwide. At the same time, ICIJ also released on its website 150 documents themselves (the rest being released progressively).

Registering offshore business entities per se is not illegal in some countries. Yet, reporters sifting through the records found that some offshore companies have been used for illegal purposes like fraud, tax evasion and stashing away money looted by dictators and their cronies.

Strange Silence

 In Delhi, reporters from India, Indonesia and Malaysia described how they went after Panama leaks information connected to their countries. For example, Ritu Sarin, Executive Editor (News and Investigation) of the Indian Express said she and two dozen colleagues worked for eight months before publishing a series of exposes linking some politicians and celebrities to offshore companies.

Listening to them, I once again wondered why ICIJ’s sole contact in Sri Lanka (and his respected newspaper) never carried a single word about Panama Leaks. That, despite nearly two dozen Lankan names coming to light.

Some of our other mainstream media splashed the Lankan names associated with Panama Papers (often mixing it up with earlier Offshore Leaks), but there has been little follow-up. In this vacuum, it was left to civic media platforms like Groundviews.org and data-savvy bloggers like Yudhanjaya Wijeratne (http://icaruswept.com) to do some intelligent probing. Their efforts are salutary but inadequate.

Now, Panama Leaks have just been followed up by Bahamas Leaks on September 22. The data is available online, for any nosy professional or citizen journalist to follow up. How many will go after it?

Given Sri Lanka’s alarming journalism deficit, investigative reporting can no longer be left to those trained in the craft and their outlets.

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com, and is on Twitter as @NalakaG.

One Sri Lanka Journalism Fellowship: Rebuilding Lankan Media, one journalist at a time…

In May 2016, the major new study on the media sector I edited titled Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka, noted:

“The new government faces the daunting task of healing the wounds of a civil war which lasted over a quarter of a century and left a deep rift in the Lankan media that is now highly polarised along ethnic, religious and political lines. At the same time, the country’s media industry and profession face their own internal crises arising from an overbearing state, unpredictable market forces, rapid technological advancements and a gradual erosion of public trust.”

The report quoted Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, who worked in the print media (Sinhala and English) and later served as Director General of Sri Lanka Press Institute, as saying:

“The ethnically non-diverse newsrooms of both sides have further fuelled the polarisation of society on ethnic lines, and this phenomenon has led the media in serving its own clientele with ‘what it wants to know’ than ‘what it needs to know’.”

This is precisely what the One Sri Lanka Journalism Fellowship Program (OSLJF) has addressed, in its own small way. An initiative of InterNews, an international media development organisation, OSLJF was a platform which has brought together Sinhala, Tamil and Muslim working journalists from across the country to conceptualize and produce stories that explored issues affecting all ordinary Lankans.

From December 2015 to September 2016, some 30 full-time or freelance journalists reporting for the country’s mainstream media were supported to engage in field-based, multi-sourced stories on social, economic and political topics of public interest. They worked in multi-ethnic teams, mentored by senior Lankan journalists drawn from the media industry who gave training sessions to strengthen the skills and broaden the horizons of this group of early and mid-career journalists.

As the project ends, the participating journalists, mentors and administrators came together at an event in Colombo on 20 September 2016 to share experiences and impressions. This was more than a mere award ceremony – it also sought to explore how the learnings can be institutionalized within the country’s mainstream and new media outlets.

I was asked to host the event, and also to moderate a panel of key media stakeholders. As a former journalist who remains a columnist, blogger and media researcher, I was happy to accept this as I am committed to building a BETTER MEDIA in Sri Lanka.

Panel on Future of Sri Lankan Journalism in the Digital Age. L to R – Nalaka Gunawardene (moderator); Deepanjali Abeywardena; Dr Ranga Kalansooriya; Dr Harini Amarasuriya; and Gazala Anver

Panel on Future of Sri Lankan Journalism in the Digital Age. L to R – Nalaka Gunawardene (moderator); Deepanjali Abeywardena; Dr Ranga Kalansooriya; Dr Harini Amarasuriya; and Gazala Anver

Here are my opening remarks for the panel:

“If you don’t like the news … go out and make some of your own!” So said Wes (‘Scoop’) Nisker, the US author, radio commentator and comedian who used that line as the title of a 1994 book.

Instead of just grumbling about imperfections in the media, more and more people are using digital technologies and the web to become their own reporters, commentators and publishers.

Rise of citizen journalism and digital media start-ups are evidence of this.

BUT we cannot ignore mainstream media (MSM) in our part of the world. MSM – especially and radio broadcasters — still have vast reach and they influence public perceptions and opinions. It is VITAL to improve their professionalism and ethical conduct.

In discussing the Future of Journalism in the Digital Age today, we want to look at BOTH the mainstream media AND new media initiatives using web/digital technologies.

BOTTOMLINE: How to uphold timeless values in journalism: Accuracy, Balance, Credibility and promotion of PUBLIC INTEREST?

I posed five broad questions to get our panelists thinking:

  • What can be done to revitalize declining quality and outreach of mainstream media?
  • Why do we have so little innovation in our media? What are the limiting factors?
  • What is the ideal mix and balance of mainstream and new media for Lanka?
  • Can media with accuracy, balance and ethics survive in our limited market? If so, how?
  • What can government, professionals and civil society to do to nurture a better media?

 The panel comprised:

  • Dr Harini Amarasuriya, Senior Lecturer, Social Studies Department, Open University
  • Deepanjali Abeywardena, Head of Information and Intelligence Services at Verité Research. Coordinator of Ethics Eye media monitoring project.
  • Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, Director General, Department of Information. Former Director General, Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI).
  • Gazala Anver, editor, Roar.lk a new media platform for all things Sri Lanka
Panel on Future of Sri Lankan Journalism in the Digital Age. L to R – Nalaka Gunawardene (moderator); Deepanjali Abeywardena; Dr Ranga Kalansooriya; Dr Harini Amarasuriya; and Gazala Anver

Panel on Future of Sri Lankan Journalism in the Digital Age. L to R – Nalaka Gunawardene (moderator); Deepanjali Abeywardena; Dr Ranga Kalansooriya; Dr Harini Amarasuriya; and Gazala Anver

සිවුමංසල කොලුගැටයා #284: දකුණු ආසියානු රජයන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයේ සියුම් මුහුණුවර හඳුනා ගනිමු

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala, appearing in the print issue of 18 Sep 2016), I discuss new forms of media repression being practised by governments in South Asia.

The inspiration comes from my participation in the Asia Media Conference organized by the Hawaii-based East-West Center in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016. Themed “South Asia Looking East”, it drew over 350 participants from across Asia and the United States.

Speeches and discussions showed how governments are more concerned about international media rights watch groups tracking the imprisonment and physical harassment of media and journalists. So their tactics of repression have changed to unleash bureaucratic and legal harassment on untamed and unbowed journalists. And also to pressurising advertisers to withdraw.

Basically this is governments trying to break the spirit and commercial viability of free media instead of breaking the bones of outspoken journalists. And it does have a chilling effect…

In this column, I focus on two glaring examples that were widely discussed at the Delhi conference.

In recent months, leading Bangladeshi editor Mahfuz Anam has been sued simultaneously across the country in 68 cases of defamation and 18 cases of sedition – all by supporters of the ruling party. Anam was one of six exceptional journalists honoured during the Delhi conference “for their personal courage in the face of threats, violence and harassment”.

In August, an announcement was made on the impending suspension of regional publication of Himal Southasian, a pioneering magazine promoting ‘cross-border journalism’ in the South Asian region. The reason was given as “due to non-cooperation by regulatory state agencies in Nepal that has made it impossible to continue operations after 29 years of publication”.

Bureaucracy is pervasive across South Asia, and when they implement commands of their political masters, they become formidable threats to media freedom and freedom of expression. Media rights watch groups, please note.

”බලවත් රජයක් හා ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය අතර ගැටුමකදී නිරන්තරයෙන්ම පාහේ මුල් වට කිහිපය ජය ගන්නේ රජයයි. බලපෑම් හා පීඩන කළ හැකි යාන්ත්‍රණ රැසක් රජය සතු නිසා. එහෙත් අන්තිමේදී ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය ජය ලබනවා!”

”කියවන විට ලිවීම සිය මාධ්‍ය කලාව ලෙස නිර්වචනය කර ගත් කීකරු මාධ්‍යවලට නම් කිසිදු රටක රජයකින් හෝ වෙනත් බල කේන‍ද්‍රවලින් තාඩන පීඩන එල්ල වන්නේ නැහැ. එහෙත් එසේ නොකරන, පොදු උන්නතිය වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටින මාධ්‍යවලට (free press) පන්න පන්නා හිරිහැර කරන සැටි දේශපාලකයන් මෙන්ම නිලධාරී තන්ත්‍රය හොඳහැටි දන්නවා. හීලෑ කර ගත නොහැකි මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හා කතුවරුන් හිරේ දැමීම, ඔවුන්ට පහරදීම හෝ මරා දැමීම බරපතළ ලෝක විවේචනයට ලක් වන නිසා ඊට වඩා සියුම් අන්දමින් මාධ්‍යවලට හිරිහැර කිරීමට දකුණු ආසියානු ආණ්ඩු දැන් නැඹුරු වී සිටිනවා, මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට එල්ල වන ප්‍රකට තර්ජන (භෞතික ප්‍රහාර හා නිල ප්‍රවෘත්ති පාලනයන්) ගැන ඇස යොමා ගෙන සිටින ජාත්‍යන්තර ආයතනවලට පවා මේවා හරිහැටි ග්‍රහණය වන්නේ නැහැ!”

මේ වටිනා විග්‍රහයන්ට මා සවන් දුන්නේ 2016 සැප්තැම්බර් 8-11 දින කිහිපය තුළ ඉන්දියාවේ නවදිල්ලියේ පැවති ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍ය සමුළුවකදී (East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference).  අමෙරිකාවේ හවායිහි පිහිටි ඊස්ට්-ටෙස්ට් කේන‍ද්‍රය තවත් කලාපීය හා ඉන්දීය පාර්ශ්වකරුවන් සමග සංවිධානය කළ මේ සමුළුවට රටවල් හතළිහකින් පමණ 350කට වැඩි මාධ්‍යවේදී පිරිසක් සහභාගි වුණා.

මා එහි ගියේ ආරාධිත කථීකයෙක් හා එක් සැසි වාරයක මෙහෙයවන්නා ලෙසින්.

තොරතුරු අයිතිය, විද්‍යුත් ආවේක්ෂණය, සමාජ මාධ්‍ය, ගවේෂණාත්මක මාධ්‍යකරණය, පාරිසරික වාර්තාකරණය ආදී විවිධ තේමා යටතේ සැසිවාර හා සාකච්ඡා රැසක් තිබුණත් වැඩිපුරම අවධානය යොමු වුණේ මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට එල්ල වන පීඩන හා තර්ජන ගැනයි.

මෙය දේශපාලන සංවාදයකට සීමා නොවී මාධ්‍යවල වෘත්තියභාවය, ආචාරධර්මීය ක්‍රියා කලාපය හා මාධ්‍ය-රජය තුලනය ආදී පැතිකඩද කතාබහ කෙරුණා.

Mahfuz Anam speaks at East West Center Media Conference in Delhi

Mahfuz Anam speaks at East West Center Media Conference in Delhi

සමුළුවේ ප්‍රධාන භූමිකාවන් රඟපෑවේ (සහ මාධ්‍ය නිදහස උදෙසා අරගල කිරීම සඳහා පිරිනැමුණු විශේෂ සම්මානයක් හිමි කර ගත්තේ) මෆූස් අනාම් (Mahfuz Anam) මාධ්‍යවේදියායි.ඔහු බංග්ලාදේශයේ අද සිටින ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨතම එසේම ලොව පිළිගත් පුවත්පත් කතුවරයෙක්. කලක් යුනෙස්කෝ සංවිධානයේ තනතුරක් හෙබ වූ ඔහු සියරට ආවේ මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත්‍රයේ සක්‍රිය වීමටයි.

ඔහු එරට මුල්පෙළේ පුවත්පතක් වන Daily Star කතුවරයා මෙන්ම ප්‍රකාශකයාද වනවා. ඩේලි ස්ටාර් බංගල්දේශයේ වඩාත්ම අලෙවි වන ඉංග්‍රීසි පුවත්පතයි. එය මීට වසර 25කට පෙර අනාම් ඇරඹුවේ එරට මිලිටරි පාලනයකින් යළිත් ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදී මාවතට පිවිසි පසුවයි.

ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය, පුරවැසි අයිතිවාසිකම්, විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණය හා රාජ්‍ය විනිවිදභාවය වැනි පරමාදර්ශයන් වෙනුවෙන් ඔහුත්, ඔහුගේ පුවත්පතත් කවදත් පෙනී සිටිනවා.

බංග්ලාදේශයේ අතිශයින් ධ්‍රැවීකරණය වී ඇති පක්ෂ දේශපාලනය ඔහු විවෘතවම විවේචනය කරනවා. මේ නිසා දේශපාලකයන් ඔහුට කැමති නැහැ. මීට පෙරද නොයෙක් පීඩනයන් එල්ල වුවත් ඔහුගේ මාධ්‍ය කලාවට ලොකුම තර්ජනය මතු වී ඇත්තේ ෂේක් හසීනා වත්මන් අගමැතිනියගේ රජයෙන්.

බලයේ සිටින ඕනෑම රජයක් සහේතුකව විවේචනය කිරීම අනාම්ගේ ප්‍රතිපත්තියයි. අධිපතිවාදී රාජ්‍ය පාලනයක් ගෙන යන හසීනා අගමැතිනියට මෙය කිසිසේත් රුස්සන්නේ නැහැ. ඇය, ඇගේ ආන්දෝලනාත්මක පුත්‍රයා හා දේශපාලන අනුගාමිකයන් ඩේලි ස්ටාර් පත්‍රයට හිරිහැර කිරීමට පටන් ගත්තේ මීට වසර 3කට පමණ පෙරයි.

එහෙත් එය උත්සන්න වූයේ 2016 පෙබරවාරියේ. එරට ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවක් සමඟ කළ සාකච්ඡාවකදී අනාම් එක්තරා පාපෝච්චාරණයක් කළා. වත්මන් අගමැතිනිය 2007දී විපක්ෂ නායිකාව ලෙස සිටියදී ඇයට එරෙහිව මතු වූ දුෂණ චෝදනා සිය පුවත්පතේ පළ කිරීම ගැන ඔහු කණගාටුව ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

එවකට එරට පාලනය කළේ හමුදාව විසින් පත් කළ,  ඡන්දයකින් නොතේරුණු රජයක්. එම රජය හසීනා අගමැතිනියට එරෙහිව මතු කළ දූෂණ චෝදනා, නිසි විමර්ශනයකින් තොරව සිය පත්‍රයේ පළ කිරීම කර්තෘ මණ්ඩල අභිමතය අනිසි ලෙස භාවිත කිරීමක් (poor editorial judgement) බව ඔහු ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පිළිගත්තා.

එම දූෂණ චෝදනා එරට වෙනත් බොහෝ මාධ්‍යද එවකට පළ කරන ලද නමුත් මෙසේ කල් ගත වී හෝ ඒ ගැන පසුතැවීමක් සිදු කර ඇත්තේ ඩේලි ස්ටාර් කතුවරයා පමණයි.

කතුවරුන් යනු අංග සම්පූර්ණ මිනිසුන් නොවෙයි. ඔවුන් අතින් ද වැරදි සිදු වනවා. ඒවා පිළිගෙන සමාව අයැද සිටීම අගය කළ යුත්තක්.

එහෙත් මේ  පාපොච්චාරණයෙන් හසීනා පාක්ෂිකයෝ දැඩි කෝපයට පත් වූවා. මහජන ඡන්දයෙන් නොව බලහත්කාරයෙන් බලයේ සිටි රජයක් එකල විපක්ෂ නායිකාවට කළ චෝදනා පත්‍රයේ පළ කිරීම ඇය දේශපාලනයෙන් ඉවත් කිරීමට කළ කුමන්ත්‍රණයක කොටසක් බව ඔවුන් තර්ක කළා.

අනාම් මේ තර්කය ප්‍රතික්ෂේප කරනවා. 2007-8 හමුදාමය රජයට එරෙහිව තමන් කතුවැකි 203ක් ලියමින් ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය යළි ස්ථාපිත කරන මෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටි බව ඔහු මතක් කරනවා. එසේම දූෂණ චෝදනා මත හසීනා අත්අඩංගුවට ගත් විට එයට එරෙහිව ප්‍රබල විරෝධතා මතු කළේත් තම පත්‍රය බව ඔහු කියනවා. (2008දී හසීනාගේ අවාමි ලීගය යළි බලයට පත් වූ විට එම චෝදනා සියල්ල කිසිදු  විභාග කිරීමකින් තොරව අත්හැර දමනු ලැබුවා.)

Mahfuz Anam, center, the editor of The Daily Star, Bangladesh’s most popular English-language newspaper, outside a court in Rangpur District, March 2016

Mahfuz Anam, center, the editor of The Daily Star, Bangladesh’s most popular English-language newspaper, outside a court in Rangpur District, March 2016 [Photo courtesy The New York Times]

පෙබරවාරි ටෙලිවිෂන් සාකච්ඡාවෙන් පසු සති කිහිපයක් තුළ රටේ විවිධ ප්‍රදේශවල උසාවිවල අනාම්ට එරෙහිව අපහාස නඩු හා රාජ්‍ය ද්‍රෝහිත්වය (sedition) අරභයා නඩු දුසිම් ගණනක් ගොනු කරනු ලැබුවා. මේ එකම නඩුවකටවත් බංග්ලාදේශ රජය සෘජුව සම්බන්ධ නැහැ. නඩු පැමිණිලිකරුවන් වන්නේ හසීනාගේ පාක්ෂිකයෝ.

මේ වන විට අපහාස නඩු 68ක් හා රාජ්‍ය ද්‍රෝහිත්වයට එරෙහි  නඩු 18ක් විභාග වෙමින් තිබෙනවා. මේවාට පෙනී සිටීමට රට වටේ යාමටත් වග උත්තර බැඳීමටත් ඔහුට සිදුව තිබෙනවා.

නඩු පැවරීමට අමතරව වෙනත් උපක්‍රම හරහාද තම පත්‍රයට හිරිහැර කරන බව අනාම් හෙළි කළා. පත්‍රයට නිතිපතා දැන්වීම් ලබා දෙන ප්‍රධාන පෙළේ සමාගම් රැසක් රාජ්‍ය බලපෑම් හමුවේ නොකැමැත්තෙන් වුවත් එය නතරකොට තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා ඩේලිස්ටාර් දැන්වීම් ආදායම 40%කින් පහත වැටිලා.

”එහෙත් මධ්‍යම හා කුඩා පරිමානයේ දැන්වීම්කරුවන් දිගටම අපට දැන්වීම් දෙන බවට ප්‍රතිඥා දී තිබෙනවා. මේ ව්‍යාපාරිකයන්ගේ කැපවීම අගය කළ යුතුයි. ආණ්ඩු බලයට නතු නොවී, බිය නොවී, ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යවලට අනුග්‍රහය දක්වන ව්‍යාපාර ඉතිරිව තිබීම අපට ලොකු සවියක්” අනාම් ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

කුඩා හා මධ්‍යම පරිමාන දැන්වීම් කරුවන්ට අමතරව බංගලාදේශයේ වෘත්තිකයන්, බුද්ධිමතුන් හා කලාකරුවන්ද ඩේලිස්ටාර් හා එහි කතුවරයා වෙනුවෙන් කථා කරනවා. සෙසු (තරඟකාරී) මාධ්‍ය කෙසේ වෙනත් මහජනයා මෙසේ ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යවල නිදහස වෙනුවෙන් කථා කිරීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

මාධ්‍ය නිදහස රැකීමට වීදි උද්ඝෝෂණ කළාට පමණක් මදි. අන්තවාදීන්ගේ හා මර්දනකාරී ආණ්ඩුවල පීඩනයට ලක් වන මාධ්‍ය ආයතනවලට ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ සහාය දැක්වීම ද අවශ්‍යයි.

නවදිල්ලි සමුළුවේ අවධානයට ලක් වූ තවත් මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයක් නම් නේපාලයේ කත්මණ්ඩු අගනුවරින් පළ කැරෙන හිමාල් (Himal) සඟරාවේ අර්බුදයයි.

Kanak Mani Dixit (left) and Kunda Dixit struggling to save Himal South Asian magazine

Kanak Mani Dixit (left) and Kunda Dixit struggling to save Himal South Asian magazine

හිමාලයට සාමුහිකව හිමිකම් කියන භූතානය, ඉන්දියාව, නේපාලය, ටිබෙටය, පකිස්ථානය හා චීනය යන රටවල් කෙරෙහි මුලින් අවධානය යොමු කළ මේ ඉංග්‍රීසි සඟරාව, වසර කිහිපයකින් සමස්ත දකුණු ආසියාවම ආවරණය කැරෙන පරිදි Himal Southasian නමින් යළි නම් කළා.

සාක් කලාපයේ රටවල (විශේෂයෙන් ඉන්දියාවේ) හොඳ කාලීන පුවත් සඟරා ඇතත් දකුණු ආසියාව ගැන පොදුවේ කථා කරන එකම වාරික ප්‍රකාශනය මෙයයි. ජාතික දේශසීමාවලින් ඔබ්බට ගොස් සංසන්දනාත්මකව හා තුලනාත්මකව සමාජ, ආර්ථීක, දේශපාලනික හා සංස්කෘතික ප්‍රශ්න ගවේෂණය කිරීම දශක තුනක් තිස්සේ හිමාල් සඟරාව ඉතා හොඳින් සිදු කරනවා.

2016 අගෝස්තු 24 වනදා හිමාල් සඟරාවේ ප්‍රකාශකයන් වන දකුණු ආසියානු භාරය (Southasia Trust) විශේෂ නිවේදනයක් නිකුත් කරමින් කියා සිටියේ නේපාල රජයේ ආයතනවලින් දිගින් දිගටම මතුව ඇති බාධක හා අවහිර කිරීම් නිසා කණගාටුවෙන් නමුත් සඟරාව පළ කිරීම නතර කරන බවයි.

”හිමාල් නිහඬ කරනු ලබන්නේ නිල මාධ්‍ය වාරණයකින් හෝ සෘජු භෞතික පහරදීමකින් හෝ නොවෙයි. නිලධාරිවාදයේ දැඩි හස්තයෙන් අපට හිරිහැර කිරීමෙන්. කිසිදු දැනුම් දීමකින් හෝ චෝදනාවකින් තොරව අපට ලැබෙන ආධාර සියල්ල අප කරා ළඟා වීම වළක්වා තිබෙනවා. අපේ සියලු ගිණුම් වාර්තා ඉහළ මට්ටමක ඇති බවත්, සියලු කටයුතු නීත්‍යනුකූල බවත් රාජ්‍ය ආයතන සහතික කළත්, අපට එල්ල වන පරිපාලනමය බාධක අඩු වී හෝ නතර වී නැහැ” එම නිවේදනයේ සඳහන් වුණා.

වෘත්තීය කර්තෘ මණ්ඩලයක් මඟින් සංස්කරණය කැරෙන, ලිපි ලියන ලේඛකයන්ට ගරුසරු ඇතුව ගෙවීම් කරන, දැන්වීම් ඉතා සීමිත මේ සඟරාවේ නඩත්තු වියදම පියවා ගත්තේ දෙස් විදෙස් දානපති ආධාරවලින්. සඟරාවට ආධාර ළඟා වීම වැළැක්වීම හරහා එය හුස්ම හිරකර මරා දැමීම එහි විරද්ධවාදීන්ගේ උපක්‍රමයයි.

මෙසේ කරන්නේ ඇයි? හිමාල් සඟරාවේ ආරම්භකයා හා අද දක්වාත් සභාපතිවරයා නේපාල ක්‍රියාකාරීක හා මගේ දිගු කාලීන මිත්‍ර කනක් මානි ඩික්සිත් (Kanak Mani Dixit). 2012 අගෝස්තු 12 මගේ තීරු ලිපියෙන් සිංහල පාඨකයන්ට ඔහුගේ ප්‍රතිපත්තිමය අරගලයන් මා හඳුන්වා දුන්නා.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #78: කනක් මානි ඩික්සිත් – හිමාල කඳු සොළවන පුංචි වැඩකාරයා

කනක්ගේ මාධ්‍ය විවේචන හමුවේ දැඩි ලෙසි උරණ වී ඔහුට නිලබලයෙන් පහර දීමට මූලිකව සිටින්නේ නේපාලයේ බලය අයථා ලෙස භාවිත කිරීම විමර්ශනය කරන රාජ්‍ය කොමිසමේ ප්‍රධානියා වන ලෝක්මාන් සිං කාර්කි.

2013 දී කාර්කි මේ තනතුරට පත් කරන විට ඔහු එයට නොසුදුසු බව කනක් ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පෙන්වා දුන්නා. එහෙත් දේශපාලකයන් පත්වීම ස්ථීර කළ අතර එතැන් පටන් මේ නිලධාරීයා නිල බලය අයථා ලෙස යොදා ගනිමින් සිය විවේචකයන්ට හිරිහැර කිරීම ඇරඹුවා.

2016 අප්‍රේල් මාසයේ දූෂණ චෝදනා මත කනක් ඩික්සින් අත් අඩංගුවට ගෙන ටික දිනක් රඳවා තැබුණා. මේ ගැන එරට හා විදෙස් මාධ්‍ය හා මානව හිමිකම් සංවිධාන දැඩි විරෝධය පළ කළා. අන්තිමේදී කනක් සියලු චෝදනාවලට නිදොස් කොට නිදහස් කරනු ලැබුවේ නේපාල ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය විසින්.

කනක්ට සෘජුව හිරිහැර කිරීම ඉන් පසු අඩු වූවත් ඔහු සම්බන්ධ මාධ්‍ය ප්‍රකාශන, ස්වේච්ඡා ආයතන හා සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධානවලට නොයෙක් බලපෑම් කිරීම දිගටම සිදු වනවා.

හිමාල් සඟරාවට හා දකුණු ආසියාව භාරයට හිරිහැර කිරීම මේ ප්‍රහාරයන්ගේ එක් පියවරක්. මේ අත්තනෝමතික නිලධාරියාට දේශපාලන බලයද ඇති නිසා අන් නිලධාරීන්  ඔහුට එරෙහි වීමට බියයි.

රාජ්‍ය තන්ත්‍රයේ මුළු බලය යොදා ගෙන පුංචි (එහෙත් නොනැමෙන) සඟරාවකට හිරිහැර කරන විට එයට එරෙහිව හඬක් නැගීමට බොහෝ නේපාල මාධ්‍ය ආයතන  පැකිලෙනවා. එයට හේතුව මර්දකයා තමන් පසුපස ද එනු ඇතැයි බියයි. මේ අතින් නේපාල තත්ත්වය බංග්ලාදේශයට වෙනස්.

පොදු උන්නතිය වෙනුවෙන් නිර්ව්‍යාජව පෙනී සිටින මාධ්‍ය ආයතනයක් හා කතුවරයෙක් මර්දනයට ලක් වූ විට ඔවුන් වෙනුවෙන් හඬ නැගීම ශිෂ්ඨ සමාජයක කාගේත් වගකීමක්. හිමාල් සඟරාව හා කනක් ඩික්සින් වෙනුවෙන් මේ හඬ වැඩිපුරම මතුව ආයේ ඔහුගේ මෙහෙවර අගයන සෙසු දකුණු ආසියාතික රටවලින්.

මේ ලිපිය ආරම්භයේ මා උපුටා දැක්වූ පලමු උධෘතය මෆූස් අනාම්ගේ. ඊළඟ උධෘතය කනක්ගේ  සොහොයුරු කුන්ඩා ඩික්සිත්ගේ. මෆූස්, කනක් හා කුන්ඩා වැනි කතුවරුන්ට සහයෝගිතාව දැක්වීම නවදිල්ලි සමුළුව පුරාම දැකිය හැකි වුණා.

අවසානයේ මාධ්‍ය ජය ගන්නා තුරු මර්දනයට ලක් වන මාධ්‍ය ආයතන හා මාධ්‍යවේදීන් සමඟ සහයෝගයෙන් සිටීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

Media innovation in Sri Lanka: Responding then to tyranny, and now to opportunity

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

The Hawaii-based East-West Center held its 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016. Themed “South Asia Looking East”, it drew over 350 participants from across Asia and the United States.

On September 11, I took part in a breakout session that discussed media innovation in Asia and the United States. While my fellow panelists spoke mainly about digital media innovation of their media outlet or media sector, I opted to survey the bigger picture: what does innovation really mean when media is under siege, and how can the media sector switch from such ‘innovation under duress’ to regular market or product innovation?

Here are my remarks, cleaned up and somewhat expanded:

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Innovation has been going on in media from the beginning. Faced with major challenges from advancing technologies and changing demography, innovation is now an imperative for market survival.

We can discuss this at different levels: product innovation, process innovation and systemic innovation. I like to add another kind for our discussion: innovation for physical survival.

With forces social and market Darwinism constantly at work, you might ask, shouldn’t the most adaptable and nimble players survive – while others perish?

Yes and No. Sometimes the odds against independent and progressive media organisations are disproportionately high – they should not be left to fend for themselves. This is where media consumers and public spirited groups need to step in.

Let me explain with a couple of examples from South Asia.

They say necessity is the mother of invention or innovation. I would argue that tyranny – from the state and/or extremist groups – provides another strong impetus for innovation in the media.

In Nepal, all media came under strict control when King Gyanendra assumed total control in February 2005. Among other draconian measures, he suspended press freedom, imposing a blanket ban on private or community broadcasters carrying news, thus making it a monopoly of state broadcasters.

The army told broadcasters that the stations were free to carry music, but not news or current affairs. Soldiers were sent to radio and TV stations to ensure compliance.

When the king’s siege of democracy continued for weeks and months, some media started defying censorship – they joined human rights activists and civil society groups in a mass movement for political reforms, including the restoration of parliamentary democracy.

Some of Nepal’s many community radio stations found creative ways of defying censorship. One station started singing the news – after all, there was no state control over music and entertainment! Another one in central Nepal went outside their studio, set up an impromptu news desk on the roadside, and read the news to passers-by every evening at 6 pm.

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R - Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R – Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

The unwavering resolve of these and other media groups and pro-democracy activists led to the restoration of parliamentary democracy in April 2006 and the subsequent abolition of the Nepali monarchy.

My second example is from Sri Lanka where I live and work.

We are recovering from almost a decade of authoritarian rule that we ended in January 2015 by changing that government in an election. The years preceding that change were the darkest for freedom of expression and media freedom in Sri Lanka – the country, then nominally a democracy, was ranked 165th among 183 countries in the World Press Freedom Index for 2014.

In June 2012, Sri Lanka was one of 16 countries named by the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression for “attacks against journalists during coverage of street protests and demonstrations, such as arbitrary arrests and detention, verbal and physical attacks, confiscation or destruction of equipment, as well as killings.”

Threats of attacks and actual incidents of physical violence in recent years led to a climate of fear and widespread self-censorship among journalists in Sri Lanka. This is slowly changing now, but old habits die hard.

At the height of media repression by the former regime, we saw some of our media innovating simply for physical survival. One strategy was using satire and parody – which became important forms of political commentary, sometimes the only ones that were possible without evoking violent reprisals.

Three years ago, I wrote a column about this phenomenon which I titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter (Ceylon Today, 5 May 2013).

What I wrote then, while still in the thick of crackdown, is worth recalling:

“For sure, serious journalism can’t be fully outsourced to satirists and stand-up comics. But comedy and political satire can play a key role in critiquing politicians, businessmen and others whose actions impact the public.

“There is another dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

“In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

“Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis is actually gossip.”

For years, cartoonists and political satirists fulfilled a deeply felt need in Sri Lanka for the media to check the various concentrations of power — in political, military, corporate and religious domains.

They still continue to perform an important role, but there is more space today for journalists and editors to report things as they are, and to comment on the key stories of the day.

During the past decade, we have also seen the rise of citizen journalism and vibrant blogospheres in the local languages of Sinhala and Tamil. Their advantage during the dark years was that they were too numerous and scattered for the repressive state to go after each one (We do know, however, that electronic surveillance was attempted with Chinese technical assistance.)

Of course, Sri Lanka’s media still face formidable challenges that threaten their market survival.

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

A new assessment of Sri Lanka’s media, which I edited earlier this year, noted: “The economic sustainability of media houses and businesses remains a major challenge. The mainstream media as a whole is struggling to retain its consumer base. Several factors have contributed to this. Many media houses have been slow in integrating digital tools and web-based platforms. As a result, there is a growing gulf between media’s production models and their audiences’ consumption patterns.”

Innovation and imagination are essential for our media to break out of 20th century mindsets and evolve new ways of content generation and consumption. There are some promising new initiatives to watch, even as much of the mainstream continues business as usual – albeit with diminishing circulations and shrinking audience shares.

Innovate or perish still applies to our media. We are glad, however, that we no longer have to innovate just to stay safe from goon squads.