Night of Ideas in Colombo: Panel on Freedom of Expression and Cartooning

L to R - Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

L to R – Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

On 26 January 2017, the Alliance Française de Kotte with the Embassy of France in Sri Lanka presented the first ever “Night of Ideas” held in Colombo. During that event, participants were invited to engage in discussions on ‘‘A World in common – Freedom of Expression (FOE)” in the presence of French and Sri Lankan cartoonists, journalists and intellectuals.

I was part of the panel that also included: Kianoush Ramezani, Founder and President of United Sketches (Paris), an Iranian artist and activist living and working in Paris since 2009 as a political refugee; and Gihan de Chickera, Political cartoonist at the Daily Mirror newspaper in Sri Lanka. The panel was moderated by Amal Jayasinghe, bureau chief of Agence France Presse (AFP) news agency.

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

In my opening remarks, I paid a special tribute to Sri Lanka’s cartoonists and satirists who provided a rare outlet for political expression during the Rajapaksa regime’s Decade of Darkness (2005-2014).

I referred to my 2010 essay, titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter’ where I had highlighted this vital aspect of FOE. Here is the gist of it:

A useful barometer of FOE and media freedom in a given society is the level of satire that prevails. Satire and parody are important forms of political commentary that rely on blurring the line between factual reporting and creative license to scorn and ridicule public figures.

Political satire is nothing new: it has been around for centuries, making fun of kings, emperors, popes and generals. Over time, satire has manifested in many oral, literary and theatrical traditions. In recent decades, satire has evolved into its own distinctive genre in print, on the airwaves and online.

Satire offers an effective – though not always fail-safe – cover for taking on authoritarian regimes that are intolerant of criticism, leave alone any dissent. No wonder the former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc inspired so much black humour.

This particular dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest political commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis in the media is actually gossip.

A good summary of our panel discussion reported by Daily News, 30 January 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Night of Ideas in Colombo - promotional brochure

Night of Ideas in Colombo – promotional brochure

 

Media innovation in Sri Lanka: Responding then to tyranny, and now to opportunity

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

The Hawaii-based East-West Center held its 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016. Themed “South Asia Looking East”, it drew over 350 participants from across Asia and the United States.

On September 11, I took part in a breakout session that discussed media innovation in Asia and the United States. While my fellow panelists spoke mainly about digital media innovation of their media outlet or media sector, I opted to survey the bigger picture: what does innovation really mean when media is under siege, and how can the media sector switch from such ‘innovation under duress’ to regular market or product innovation?

Here are my remarks, cleaned up and somewhat expanded:

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Innovation has been going on in media from the beginning. Faced with major challenges from advancing technologies and changing demography, innovation is now an imperative for market survival.

We can discuss this at different levels: product innovation, process innovation and systemic innovation. I like to add another kind for our discussion: innovation for physical survival.

With forces social and market Darwinism constantly at work, you might ask, shouldn’t the most adaptable and nimble players survive – while others perish?

Yes and No. Sometimes the odds against independent and progressive media organisations are disproportionately high – they should not be left to fend for themselves. This is where media consumers and public spirited groups need to step in.

Let me explain with a couple of examples from South Asia.

They say necessity is the mother of invention or innovation. I would argue that tyranny – from the state and/or extremist groups – provides another strong impetus for innovation in the media.

In Nepal, all media came under strict control when King Gyanendra assumed total control in February 2005. Among other draconian measures, he suspended press freedom, imposing a blanket ban on private or community broadcasters carrying news, thus making it a monopoly of state broadcasters.

The army told broadcasters that the stations were free to carry music, but not news or current affairs. Soldiers were sent to radio and TV stations to ensure compliance.

When the king’s siege of democracy continued for weeks and months, some media started defying censorship – they joined human rights activists and civil society groups in a mass movement for political reforms, including the restoration of parliamentary democracy.

Some of Nepal’s many community radio stations found creative ways of defying censorship. One station started singing the news – after all, there was no state control over music and entertainment! Another one in central Nepal went outside their studio, set up an impromptu news desk on the roadside, and read the news to passers-by every evening at 6 pm.

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R - Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R – Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

The unwavering resolve of these and other media groups and pro-democracy activists led to the restoration of parliamentary democracy in April 2006 and the subsequent abolition of the Nepali monarchy.

My second example is from Sri Lanka where I live and work.

We are recovering from almost a decade of authoritarian rule that we ended in January 2015 by changing that government in an election. The years preceding that change were the darkest for freedom of expression and media freedom in Sri Lanka – the country, then nominally a democracy, was ranked 165th among 183 countries in the World Press Freedom Index for 2014.

In June 2012, Sri Lanka was one of 16 countries named by the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression for “attacks against journalists during coverage of street protests and demonstrations, such as arbitrary arrests and detention, verbal and physical attacks, confiscation or destruction of equipment, as well as killings.”

Threats of attacks and actual incidents of physical violence in recent years led to a climate of fear and widespread self-censorship among journalists in Sri Lanka. This is slowly changing now, but old habits die hard.

At the height of media repression by the former regime, we saw some of our media innovating simply for physical survival. One strategy was using satire and parody – which became important forms of political commentary, sometimes the only ones that were possible without evoking violent reprisals.

Three years ago, I wrote a column about this phenomenon which I titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter (Ceylon Today, 5 May 2013).

What I wrote then, while still in the thick of crackdown, is worth recalling:

“For sure, serious journalism can’t be fully outsourced to satirists and stand-up comics. But comedy and political satire can play a key role in critiquing politicians, businessmen and others whose actions impact the public.

“There is another dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

“In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

“Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis is actually gossip.”

For years, cartoonists and political satirists fulfilled a deeply felt need in Sri Lanka for the media to check the various concentrations of power — in political, military, corporate and religious domains.

They still continue to perform an important role, but there is more space today for journalists and editors to report things as they are, and to comment on the key stories of the day.

During the past decade, we have also seen the rise of citizen journalism and vibrant blogospheres in the local languages of Sinhala and Tamil. Their advantage during the dark years was that they were too numerous and scattered for the repressive state to go after each one (We do know, however, that electronic surveillance was attempted with Chinese technical assistance.)

Of course, Sri Lanka’s media still face formidable challenges that threaten their market survival.

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

A new assessment of Sri Lanka’s media, which I edited earlier this year, noted: “The economic sustainability of media houses and businesses remains a major challenge. The mainstream media as a whole is struggling to retain its consumer base. Several factors have contributed to this. Many media houses have been slow in integrating digital tools and web-based platforms. As a result, there is a growing gulf between media’s production models and their audiences’ consumption patterns.”

Innovation and imagination are essential for our media to break out of 20th century mindsets and evolve new ways of content generation and consumption. There are some promising new initiatives to watch, even as much of the mainstream continues business as usual – albeit with diminishing circulations and shrinking audience shares.

Innovate or perish still applies to our media. We are glad, however, that we no longer have to innovate just to stay safe from goon squads.

 

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #163: අභීත පෑනෙන් භාරතය කිති කැවූ කුෂ්වාන්ත් සිං

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala), I pay tribute to Khushwant Singh (1915-2014), writer and journalist who died on 20 March 2014 aged 99. He is best remembered for his satire, humour and trenchant secularism. I make special mention of his defiance of death threats from Sikh fundamentalists in the 1980s, and his vocal stand against all organised religions.

Khushwant Singh (1915-2014)

Khushwant Singh (1915-2014)

මොන යකකුට, දෙවියකුට හෝ රජයකටවත් බිය නොවී අභීතව දශක ගණනක් ලේඛන කලාවේ යෙදුණු ඉන්දීය ලේඛක කුෂ්වාන්ත් සිං (Khushwant Singh) 99 හැවිරිදිව 2014 මාර්තු 20 වනදා මිය ගියා.

ඔහුගේ දැඩි විවේචනවලට නිතර හසු වූ දේශපාලකයන්, කලාකරුවන් හා වෙනත් නාමධාරී ඉන්දියානුවන් හැම කෙනකු ම පාහේ මතභේද පසෙක ලා මේ ලේඛකයාට ප‍්‍රණාමය පුද කළා.

ඉංග‍්‍රීසිය මවුබස ලෙස හැසරවීමේ හපන්කම තිබූ ඉන්දීය ලේඛකයන් අතර මුල් තැන ගත් ඔහු තමන්ටම ආවේණික ශෛලියක් බිහි කළේ උපහාසය, කථාන්තර කීමේ හැකියාව හා සැමට ‘ටිකිරි ටොකු’ දීමේ දක්‍ෂකම හරහායි.

‘‘මා ඉන්දියානුවකු වන්නේ ඇයි?’’ යයි වරක් ලිපියක් ලියමින් ඔහු එයට මෙසේ පිළිතුරු දුන්නා. ‘‘මට ඒ ගැන අභිමතයක් තිබුණේ නැහැ. මා උපන්නේ මෙරටයි. හැබැයි උපදින්නට කලින් මගෙන් ඇසුවා නම් මීට වඩා ඉසුරුබර, මෙතරම් ජනාකීර්ණ නොවූ, කන බොන දේ ගැන මේ තරම් බොරු සීමා පනවා නොගත්, ආගම් අන්ධ ලෙස නොඅදහන වෙන රටක් මා තෝරා ගන්නවා!’’

ඔහුගේ ජීවන දර්ශනය මේ උත්තරයේ කැටි වී තිබුණා යයි කිව හැකියි. මවු රට, තමන්ගේ ජාතිය, සංස්කෘතික උරුමය හා බලයේ සිටින රජයන් හා පාලකයන් අදීනව හා තර්කානුකූලව විවේචනය කිරීමට සමත් වූ ඔහු කිසිදු තරාතිරමක් නොබලා ඕනෑ ම ජගතකු නිර්දය ලෙස උපහාසයට ලක් කිරීමට ද මැලි වූයේ නැහැ. විශේෂයෙන් උගත්කම, වංශවත්බව, තනතුරේ ලොකුකම ආදිය නිසා හිස උදුම්මා ගත් අය ඔහුගේ පෑන් පහරින් දිගට ම බෑට කෑවා.

වෘත්තීය ජීවිතය මුල් කාලයේදී නීතීඥයකු ලෙසත්, ඉන් පසුව ඉන්දීය විදේශීය සේවයේ නිලධාරියකු ලෙසත් කළක් ක‍්‍රියා කළ ඔහු 1950 ගණන්වල පටන් වෘත්තීය ලේඛකයකු හා පත‍්‍ර කලාවේදීයකු ලෙස කටයුතු කළා. ජීවිතයේ අඩසිවසකට වැඩි කලක් තිස්සේ පොත් අසූ ගණනක්, පුවත්පත් තීරු ලිපි (කොලම්) දහස් ගණනක් හා වෙනත් ලිපි ලේඛන විශාල සංඛ්‍යාවක් රචනා කළා.

මේ හැම එකකම සුවිශේෂී ගුණය වූයේ සරල, සුමට හා මිත‍්‍රශීලී වූ ඉංග‍්‍රීසි බසින් නිර්මාණය වීමයි. බොහෝ පොත පත කියවූ, දේශසංචාර කළ හා ශාස්ත‍්‍රීය නැඹුරුවක් තිබූ චරිතයක් වුවත් කුෂ්වාන්ත් ඉතිහාසය, දර්ශනවේදය, දේශපාලනය, සාහිත්‍යය හා කාලීන මාතෘකා රැසක් ගැන ගැඹුරු වූත්, තුලනාත්මක වූත් විග‍්‍රහයන් ලිව්වේ කාටත් තේරෙන බසින්.

Khushwant-Singh -  cartoon by Prabhakar Wairkar

Khushwant-Singh – cartoon by Prabhakar Wairkar

පත්තර කලාවට ආ විට ඔහු එයට සරිලන ශෛලියකින් කි‍්‍රයා කළා. 1970 දශකයේ ඉන්දියාවේ ජනප‍්‍රියම සඟරාව වූ ඉලස්ටේ‍්‍රටඞ් වීක්ලි ඔෆ් ඉන්ඩියා හි (Illustrated Weekly of India) කතුවරයා ලෙස ඔහු ජනප‍්‍රිය සංස්කෘතියට මුල් තැන දුන්නා. ව්‍යාපාරික, කලා ක්‍ෂෙත‍්‍රයන්ගේ අක‍්‍රමිකතා හෙළිදරවු කරන අතර බොරු ප‍්‍රතිරූප ගොඩ නගා ගෙන සිටි (බොල් පිළිම ආකාරයේ) නාමධාරින්ට එරෙහි වූවා.

කුෂ්වාන්ත්ගේ පත‍්‍ර කලාවේ සදාදරණීය කාලය වූයේ මේ සඟරාවේ කතුවරයා ලෙස කි‍්‍රයා කළ අවුරුදු නවයයි (1969-78). බාර ගන්නා විට සතියට පිටපත් 65,000ක් අලෙවි වූ සඟරාව මාස කිහිපයකින් හාර ලක්‍ෂය දක්වා වැඩි කිරීමට ඔහු සමත් වුණා. ටයිම්ස් ඔෆ් ඉන්ඩියා සමාගමට අයත්, 1880දී ඇරඹී මේ සඟරාව ඉන්දීය ජන සමාජයට ඉතා සමීප ප‍්‍රකාශනයක් බවට පත් වූයේ ඔහුගේ කාලයේයි.

බංග්ලාදේශයේ නිදහස් සටන (1971), ඔපෙක් තෙල් අර්බුදය (1973), ඉන්දියාවේ මර්දනකාරී හදිසි නීතිය (1975) හා පාකිස්ථානු අගමැති අලි බූතෝ එල්ලා මැරීම (1977) වැනි භාරතය හා ලොව කැළඹූ සිදුවීම් ගැන විමර්ශනාත්මකවත් සරලවත් විග‍්‍රහ කිරීමට සඟරාව සමත් වුණා. ලිපි ලේඛන ඔපවත් කරන්නට මනාව ඡායාරූප යොදා ගැනීමත් මරියෝ මිරැන්ඩා හා ආර් කේ ලක්‍ෂ්මන් වැනි චිත‍්‍ර/කාටුන් ශිල්පීන් සම්බන්ධ කර ගැනීමත් කළා.

ඉන්දිරා ගාන්ධි අගමැතිනියගේ හා ඇගේ පුත් සංජේ ගාන්ධිගේ හිතවතකු හා අනුගාමිකයකු වීම නිසා කුෂ්වාන්ත්ගේ ස්වාධීනත්වය හා විශ්වසනීයත්වය පළුදු වුණා. එහෙත් බලවත් අගමැතිනියක ලෙස ඉන්දිරා රට පාලනය කරන කාලයේ ඇය සමග ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේත්, පෞද්ගලිකවත් වාද විවාද කරන්නත් ඇගේ සමහර දරදඬු ප‍්‍රතිපත්තිවලට එරෙහි වන්නත් හැකි පෞරුෂය කුෂ්වාන්ත්ට තිබුණා.

පසු කලෙක ඔහු ස්වංලිඛිත චරිතාපදානයේ කීවේ ඉන්දියානු දේශපාලනයේ හා රාජ්‍ය පාලනයේ බොහෝ වැරදුණු තැන්වලට මුල් වූයේ ඉන්දිරාගේ දරදඬු පාලන ශෛලිය බවයි.

IBN TV's tribute to Khushwant Singh played on the image of editor inside the light bulb - the graphic used by him when he edited Illustrated Weekly of India (1969-78)

IBN TV’s tribute to Khushwant Singh played on the image of editor inside the light bulb – the graphic used by him when he edited Illustrated Weekly of India (1969-78)

1980-83 වකවානුවේ ඔහු හින්දුස්ථාන් ටයිම්ස් (The Hindustan Times) පත‍්‍රයේ ප‍්‍රධාන කතුවරයා වුණා. නව දිල්ලියේ හා උතුරු ඉන්දියාවේ වඩාත් ප‍්‍රබල දිනපතා පුවත්පත වූ එහි කතුවරයාට සමන්ත ඉන්දියාවේ ම දේශපාලන හා ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රවාහයන්ට ලොකු බලපෑමක් කළ හැකියි.

ප‍්‍රබල ව්‍යාපාරික පවුලක් වූ බිර්ලාවරුන්ට අයත් මේ පත‍්‍රයේ කතුවරයා ලෙස කුෂ්වාන්ත් මාණ්ඩලික වාර්තාකරුවන්ට හා විශේෂාංග ලේඛකයන්ට හැකි තාක් කර්තෘ මණ්ඩල නිදහස හා වගකීම් දුන් බව ප‍්‍රකටයි. හිමිකරුවන්ගේ මැදිහත්වීම් සමනය කරන්නටත්, දේශපාලන බලපෑම් අවම කරන්නටත් ඔහු උත්සාහ කළා.

1980 දශකය මුලදී ඉන්දියාවේ අන්තවාදී සික්වරුන් පිරිසක් අකාලි ඩාල් පක්‍ෂය හරහා සංවිධානය වෙමින් කාලිස්ථාන් (Khalistan) නම් වෙනම රාජ්‍යයක් ඉල්ලා උද්ඝෝෂණ කළා. සම්භවයෙන් සික්වරයකු වුවත්, සික් සාංස්කෘතික උරුමය ගැන ආඩම්බර වුවත් කුෂ්වාන්ත් මේ ක‍්‍රියා මාර්ගය ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ විවේචනය කළා. මේ උද්ඝෝෂණය සික් ජනයාටත්, ඉන්දියාවටත් අහිතකර බව පෙන්වා දුන්නා.

රටේ ප‍්‍රසිද්ධතම සික්වරයකු ලෙස කුෂ්වාන්ත් ගත් මේ ස්ථාවරය ගැන අන්තවාදී සික් පිරිස දැඩි ලෙස කෝප වුණා. තර්කයට ප‍්‍රතිතර්කය මතු කරනු වෙනුවට ඔවුන් ඔහුට මරණ තර්ජන එල්ල කළා.

මේ වන විට ඔවුන් සන්නද්ධ අරගලයකට යොමු වී සිටි නිසා කුෂ්වාන්ත්ට පොලිස් ආරක්‍ෂාව ලබාදීමට ඉන්දීය රජය ක‍්‍රියා කළා. එහෙත් තර්ජන කිසිවකට නොසැළුණු කුෂ්වාන්ත් දිගින් දිගට ම තම සහෝදර සික්වරුන්ගේ අදුරදර්ශී ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩ පිළිවෙත් සිය පුවත්පත හරහා විවේචනය කළා.

කුෂ්වාන්ත් තමන්ට ලැබුණු මරණ තර්ජන ගැන තම ප‍්‍රකාශනයේ මෙසේ පළ කළා.

‘‘ගෙවී ගිය සතියේ දිනෙක මුද්‍රිත පත‍්‍රිකාවක් මට තැපෑලෙන් ලැබුණා. එහි කියා තිබුණේ එය ලැබෙන හැම දෙනාමත්, ඔවුන්ගේ පවුල්වල උදවියත් කාලිස්ථානයේ සතුරන් ලෙස හඳුනාගෙන ඇති බවත් දින දහයක් ඇතුළත ඔවුන් මරා දමන බවත්.’’

‘‘මෙයට පෙර සිවු වසරක් තිස්සේ විටින් විට දුරකථනයෙන් හෝ තැපෑලෙන් හෝ මෙයට සමාන මරණ තර්ජන මට ලැබී තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් මුද්‍රිත තර්ජනයක් ලැබුණු මුල් වතාව මෙයයි. එසේම නිශ්චිත දින ගණනක් ඇතුළත මරනු ලබන බවට කියන්නේත් පළමු වතාවටයි. මින් පෙර පරුෂ වචනයෙන් මට බැන වැදී අවසන් ගමනට සූදානම් වී සිටින්න යයි කීවා පමණයි.’’

‘‘මේ තර්ජන අතරමැද නොසැලී හා නිදි නොවරා මගේ වැඩ කර ගෙන යන්නට මා පුරුදුව සිටිනවා. මගේ වයසේ හැටියට රෝගාතුර වී මාස ගණනක් රෝහල්ගත වී ඔත්පලව සිට මිය යනවාට වඩා ඉක්මන් මරණයක් ලැබුණොත් මාත් එයට කැමතියි. එපමණක් නොවෙයි, මෙසේ මරා දමනු ලැබුවොත් මා වෘත්තියට දිවි පිදු වීරයකු ද වනවා. මා මේ බොරුවට වීරකම් කථා කරනවා නොවෙයි. සික්වරයකු වුවත් මා තරමක බියගුල්ලෙක්. මගේ ඝාතකයන් වන්නට කුරුමානම් අල්ලන උදවිය දන්නවා හරියට තර්කයක් හා වාදයක් දිනා ගන්නට බැරි කෙනකුගේ අවසාන තර්කය වෙඩි උණ්ඩය බව.’’

‘‘මා මුල සිටම විශ්වාස කළේත්, ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ ප‍්‍රකාශ කර සිටියේත් සික් ධර්මයේ හා සංස්කෘතියේ හරයන්ට කාලිස්ථාන සංකල්පය මුළුමනින්ම විරුද්ධ හා නොගැලපෙන බවයි. කිසිවකුගේ නිර්නාමික තර්ජනවලින් මේ මතය දැරීම හා එය පළ කිරීම මා නතර කරන්නේ නැහැ. ඔබට දැන ගන්නට ඕනෑ නම් මා ඔප්පු කර පෙන්වන්නම් මගේ පෑන ඔබ සතු කඩුවකට, රයිෆලයකට හෝ කලශ්නිකෝෆ් තුවක්කුවකට වඩා බලවත් බව.’’

‘‘හැබැයි මේ මුද්‍රිත තර්ජන පත‍්‍රිකාව එක් අතෙකින් මා සන්තාපයට පත් කළා. මෙබඳු පත‍්‍රිකාවක් මට පමණක් එවන්නට එය මුද්‍රණය කළ යුතු නැහැ. සිය ගණනක්, සමහර විට දහස් ගණනක් තවත් අයට මෙහි පිටපත් යවා ඇති. මේ තර්ජනකරුවන්ගේ ඝාතන ලැයිස්තුවේ මා සිටින්නේ පහලට වන්නට විය යුතුයි. මට වඩා වැදගත් ඉලක්කයන් බිලි ගත්තාට පසුව ඔවුන් මා හඹා එනු ඇති. මෙය මගේ ආත්මාභිමානයට පහරක්. කාගෙවත් ඝාතන ලයිස්තුවකට මා ඇතුළත් කරනවා නම් මා කැමතියි එහි මුලින්ම, ඉහළින්ම සිටින්නට. මගේ සැඟවුණු ඝාතකයෝ මට මේ අවසාන ගෞරවය ලබා දෙනු ඇතැයි මා සිතනවා.’’

indira_gandhiසික්වරුන්ගේ ශුද්ධ වූ රන් දෙවොල ඉන්දීය හමුදාව විසින් යටත් කිරීමෙන් සිදු වූ විශාල ලේ වැගිරීමට පළි ගැනීමක් වශයෙන් 1984 ඔක්තෝම්බර් 31 වනදා ඉන්දිරා ගාන්ධි අගමැතිනිය ඇගේ ම සික් ආරක්‍ෂකයන් දෙදෙනෙකු විසින් වෙඩි තබා ඝාතනය කරනු ලැබුවා.

හින්දුස්ථාන් ටයිම්ස් පත‍්‍රයේ කතුවරයා ලෙස තුන්වන වසරේ සේවා කාලය දිගු කරන විට හිමිකරු හා ප‍්‍රකාශක කේ. කේ. බිර්ලා ඉතා සුහදව කුෂ්වාන්ත්ගෙන් මෙසේ ඇසුවා. ‘‘සර්දා සාහිබ් (ලොකු මහත්තයා), විශ‍්‍රාම යන්න එහෙම කල්පනාවක් නැද්ද?’’

ඒ වන විට කුෂ්වාන්ත්ගේ වයස 69යි. ඔහු මෙසේ පිළිතුරු දුන්නා. ‘‘මා විශ‍්‍රාම ගන්නේ මගේ නිසල දේහය ගිනි දල්වන්ට රැගෙන යන විටයි.’’

අන්තිමේදී වයස 99ක් සපිරුණු පසුවත් ඔහු ලිවීම නතර කළේ නැහැ. වයස්ගත වීමත් සමග තරමක ශාරීරික දුබලතා මතු වුවත් ඔහු ඉතා හොඳ සිහියෙන් හා ධනාත්මක, උපහාසාත්මක මනසකින් දිගට ම පසු වූ බව සමීපතයෝ කියනවා.

හින්දුස්ථාන් ටයිම්ස් පත‍්‍රයට තමාගේ සතිපතා කොලම අවසානය දක්වා ම ලියුවා. කුෂ්වාන්ත්ගේ දේශපාලන ස්ථාවරයන් හා හිතවත්කම් ගැන ප‍්‍රතිවිරුද්ධ මත ඉන්දීය සමාජයේ කෙතරම් තිබුණත් ඔහුගේ කොලම මිතුරන්, පසමිතුරන් සැවොම නොවරදවා කියවූවා.

ඔහු ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ ඉන්දියානු සමාජයෙන් ඕනෑකමින් ම වෙනස් වූ තවත් සාධකයක් වූයේ නිර්ආගමික ස්ථාවරයයි. සික් උරුමය ප‍්‍රගුණ කරමින්, තලප්පාවක් පැළඳ හා ආවේණික රැවුලක් වවා සිටියත් ඔහු කිසිදා ආගමික වතාවත් හෝ පුද පූජාවලට සහභාගී වූයේ නැහැ. දේවවාද හෝ අදේවවාද හෝ මත පදනම් වූ කිසිදු සංවිධානගත ආගමක් නැතහොත් සාමයික දර්ශනයක් නොපිළිගත් ඔහු කීවේ හොඳ නරක පිළිබඳ හොඳම විනිශ්චය තමන්ගේ හෘදය සාක්‍ෂිය බවයි.

‘‘ආගම් සියල්ලේම මනෝමය මූලය වන්නේ නොදන්නා දේ ගැන මිනිසුන් තුළ පවතින බියයි’’ ඔහු කියා සිටියා. ‘‘දෙවියන් කියා කෙනෙකු සිටී ද නැත් ද යන්න ගැන පලකට නැති වාද කරනවා වෙනුවට අප සිහි තබා ගත යුතු වැදගත්ම කරුණ නම් කෙනකු හොඳ හෝ නරක හෝ චරිතයක් වීමට දෙවියන් පැවතීමේ අදාලත්වයක් නැති බවයි. කිසිදු ආගමක් ධර්මයක් නොඅදහන කෙනෙකුට වුව ද ඉතා හොඳ පුද්ගලයකු විය හැකියි. එමෙන්ම දිවා රාත‍්‍රී දෙවියන් අදහන වඳින පුදන තක්කඩියෝත් එමට සිටිනවා!’’

ඔහු 2012 හා 2013දී ලියා පළ කළ අන්තිම පොත් දෙකෙන් සිය නිර්ආගමික දර්ශනය වඩාත් පැහැදිලි කළා. සංවිධානගත ආගම්වල නිර්දය ලෙස පහර දීම ඔහු නතර කළේම නැහැ. සියළු ආගම්වල පූජකයන් පරපෝෂිත දුෂිතයන් හැටියට හඳුන්වා දුන්නා.

ඉන්දියාවේ සියළු ආගම් ගැන ගැඹුරු වූ ශාස්ත‍්‍රීය දැනුමක් තිබුණත් ඔහු එදිනෙදා චරිතගති සකස් කර ගත්තේ කෙලිලොල්, සැහැල්ලූ හා විනෝදකාමී ලෙසටයි. උගත්කමින් හිස උදුම්මාගත් පණ්ඩිතයන්ට හා උපාසකරාළලාට මෙය දරා ගන්නට අපහසු වුණා.

කුෂ්වාන්ත් ගැන තව බොහෝ දේ මෙනෙහි කළ හැකියි. ගතානුගතිකත්වයට, සුචරිතවාදයට හා දෛවවාදයට (fatalism) ප‍්‍රබල ලෙස එරෙහි වූ ඔහු තනි ගසක් තනි කරලක් මෙන් තමාට ආවේණික ජීවන රටාවක් හා ලේඛන කලාවක් දිගු ජීවිතය පුරා ප‍්‍රගුණ කළා. අන්තිමේදී ඔහු මිය ගියේ තම සොහොන් කොතේ ලිවිය යුතු වැකි ද රචනා කොටයි.

‘‘මෙතැන නිදන්නේ මිනිසුන්ට හෝ දෙවියන්ට තැකීමක්
නොකළ අයෙක්. ඔහුට ඔබේ කඳුළු නාස්ති කරන්න එපා.
ඔහු අමිහිරි දේ ලිවීමෙන් තෘප්තියක් ලැබූවෙක්.
මේ යකඩයා මැරුණ එක හොඳ යයි සිතා සැනසෙන්න!’’

Khushwant-Singh & his chosen epitaph

Political Satire: When making fun is no laughing matter

Paper paper shining bright...but for how long? Cartoon by Mike Luckovich

My regular readers know my deep interest in political satire, and fascination with cartoons of all kinds including those political. On this blog, we’ve also discussed the worldwide decline in mainstream journalism.

I’ve just blended my thoughts in these strands in my latest op ed essay, ostensibly a book review. It has just been published by Groundviews.org as Political Satire in Sri Lanka: When Making Fun is No Laughing Matter

Here are the opening paras:

Political satire is nothing new: it has been around for as long as organised government, trying to keep the wielders of power in check. Over the centuries, it has manifested in many oral, literary or theatrical traditions, some of it more enduring — such as Gulliver’s Travels and Animal Farm. And for over a century, political cartoonists have also been doing it with such brilliant economy of words. Together, these two groups probably inspire more nightmares in tyrants than anyone or anything else.

“Today, political satire has also emerged as a genre on the airwaves and in cyberspace, and partly compensates for the worldwide decline in serious and investigative journalism. Many mainstream media outlets have become too submissive and subservient to political and corporate powers. Those who still have the guts often lack the resources and staff to pursue good journalism.

“If Nature abhors a vacuum, so does human society — and both conjure ways of quickly filling it up. Into this ‘journalism void’ have stepped two very different groups of people: citizen journalists, who take advantage of the new information and communications technologies (ICTs), and political satirists who revive the ancient arts of caricaturisation and ego-blasting…”

In this essay, I revisit a question I first posed in my July 2009 blog post: News wrapped in laughter: Is this the future of current affairs journalism?

Read the full essay:
Political Satire in Sri Lanka: When Making Fun is No Laughing Matter

You might also like to look at these other related blog posts:

August 2009: The XYZ Show: New horizon in political satire on African TV, but room to grow?

Sep 2009: XYZ Show controversy: Kenyan politicians forgetting ‘Hakuna matata’?