Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

“Sri Lanka wants to make a new Constitution in a radically different way. It is poised to become the first developing country in the world to ‘crowd-source’ ideas for making the highest law of the land.

“That is all well and good – as long as the due process is followed, and that process has intellectual rigour, transparency and integrity. Therein lies the big challenge.”

So opens my latest op-ed essay, just published by Groundviews.org

Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

In it, I describe the experience of Iceland which was the world’s first country to ‘crowd-source’ a new Constitution. From 2011 to 2013, the European nation of 330,000 people engaged in an exercise of direct democracy to come up with a modern Constitution to replace the existing one adopted in 1944. That involved many public hearings as well as using social media and other communications platforms to gather public inputs and to ensure public scrutiny.

Facebook was used as part of a public consultation strategy to draft Iceland's new Constitution in 2011-13

Facebook was used as part of a public consultation strategy to draft Iceland’s new Constitution in 2011-13

This is the path that Sri Lanka has now chosen: open and participatory Constitution making. To be sure, tropical Sri Lanka is vastly different. Its population of 21 million is 60 times larger than Iceland’s. But the Arctic nation’s generic lessons are well worth studying – both for inspiration and precaution.

I point out: “In doing so, it is important to ensure that public consultative process is not limited to the web and social media. Instead of dominating, technologies should only enable maximum participation.”

“The bottom-line: gathering public proposals is commendable, but not an end by itself. The government needs to adopt a systematic method to study, categorize and distil the essence of what is suggested. And that must happen across English, Sinhala and Tamil languages.”

Read full essay:

Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

yourconstitution.lk website calls for public inputs for making Sri Lanka's new Constitution.

yourconstitution.lk website calls for public inputs for making Sri Lanka’s new Constitution.

Advertisements

Corridors of Power Panel: Tapping our ‘Hybrid Media Reality’ to secure democracy in Sri Lanka

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera. Photo by Manisha Aryal

I just spoke on a panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy” which was part of the public exhibition in Colombo called Corridors of power: Drawing and modelling Sri Lanka’s tryst with democracy.

Media panel promo

The premise for our panel was as follows:

The architecture of the mainstream media, and increasingly, social media (even though distinct divisions between the two are increasingly blurred) to varying degrees reflects or contests the timbre of governance and the nature of government.

How can ‘acts of journalism’ by citizens revitalise democracy and how can journalism itself be revived to engage more fully with its central role as watchdog?

In a global contest around editorial independence stymied by economic interests within media institutions, how can Sri Lanka’s media best ensure it attracts, trains and importantly, retains a calibre of journalists who are able to take on the excesses of power, including the silencing of inconvenient truths by large corporations?

The panel, moderated by lawyer and political scientist Asoka Obeyesekere comprised freelance journalist Amantha Perera, Sunday Observer editor Lakshman Gunasekera, and myself.

Here are my opening remarks (including some remarks made during Q&A).

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power - Photo by Manisha Aryal

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power – Photo by Manisha Aryal

Panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy”

20 Sep 2015, Colombo

Remarks by Nalaka Gunawardene

Curator Sanjana has asked us to reflect on a key question: What is the role of media in securing democracy against its enemies, within the media itself and beyond?

I would argue that we are in the midst of multiple, overlapping deficits:

  • Democracy Deficit, a legacy of the past decade in particular, which is now recognised and being addressed (but we have a long way to go)
  • Public Trust Deficit in politicians and public institutions – not as widely recognised, but is just as pervasive and should be worrying us all.
  • Media Deficit, probably the least recognised deficit of all. This has nothing to do with media’s penetration or outreach. Rather, it concerns how our established (or mainstream) MEDIA FALLS SHORT IN PERFORMING the responsibilities of watchdog, public platform and the responsibility to “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable”.

In this context, can new media – citizens leveraging the web, mobile devices and the social media platforms – bridge this deficit?

My answer is both: YES and NO!

YES because new media opportunities can be seized – and are being seized — by our citizens to enhance a whole range of public interest purposes, including:

  • Political participation
  • Advocacy and activism
  • Transparency and accountability in public institutions
  • Peace-building and reconciliation
  • Monitoring and critiquing corporate conduct

All these trends are set to grow and involve more and more citizens in the coming years. Right now, one in four Lankans uses the web, mostly thru mobile devices.

BUT CAN IT REPLACE THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA?

NO, not in the near term. For now, these counter-media efforts are not sufficient by themselves to bridge the three deficits I have listed above. The mainstream media’s products have far more outreach and and the institutions, far more resources.

Also, the rise of citizen-driven new media does NOT – and should NOT — allow mainstream media to abdicate its social responsibilities.

This is why we urgently need MEDIA SECTOR REFORMS in Sri Lanka – to enhance editorial independence AND professionalism.

The debate is no longer about who is better – Mainstream media (MSM) or citizen driven civic media.

WE NEED BOTH.

So let us accept and celebrate our increasingly HYBRID MEDIA REALITY (‘hybrid’ seems to be currently popular!). This involves, among other things:

  • MSM drawing on Civic Media content; and
  • Civic Media spreading MSM content even as they critique MSM

To me, what really matters are the ACTS OF JOURNALISM – whether they are RANDOM acts or DELIBERATE acts of journalism.

Let me end by drawing on my own experience. Trained and experienced in mainstream print and broadcast media, I took to web-based social media 8 years ago when I started blogging (for fun). I started tweeting five years ago, and am about to cross 5,000 followers.

It’s been an interesting journey – and nowhere near finished yet.

Everyday now, I have many and varied CONVERSATIONS with some of my nearly 5,000 followers on Twitter. Here are some of the public interest topics we have discussed during this month:

  • Rational demarcation of Ministry subject areas (a lost cause now)
  • Implications of XXL Cabinet of the National/Consensus Govt
  • Questionable role of our Attorney General in certain prosecutions
  • Report on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) Session
  • Is Death Penalty the right response to rise of brutal murders?
  • Can our media be more restrained and balanced in covering sexual crimes involving minors?
  • How to cope with Hate Speech on ethnic or religious grounds
  • What kind of Smart Cities or MegaCity do we really need?
  • How to hold CocaCola LK responsible for polluting Kelani waters?

Yes, many of these are fleeting and incomplete conversations. So what?

And also, there’s a lot of noise in social media: it’s what I call the Global Cacophony.

BUT these conversations and cross-talk often enrich my own understanding — and hopefully help other participants too.

Self-promotional as this might sound, how many Newspaper Editors in Sri Lanka can claim to have as many public conversations as I am having using social media?

Let me end with the closing para in a chapter on social media and governance I recently wrote for Transparency International’s Sri Lanka Governance Report 2014 (currently in print):

“Although there have been serious levels of malgovernance in Sri Lanka in recent years, the build up on social media platforms to the Presidential Election 2015 showed that Lankan citizens have sufficient maturity to use ICTs and other forms of social mobilisation for a more peaceful call for regime change. Channelling this civic energy into governance reform is the next challenge.”

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #174: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඇවිලෙන ගින්නට පිදුරු දැමීමක් ද?

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala), I discuss the role of mainstream and social media in the immediate aftermath of serious communal riots in Aluthgama, Beruwala and Dharga Town in Sri Lanka on 15 June 2014.

For over 48 hours, there was little coverage of the incidents in newspapers, or on radio and TV. This gap was partly filled by social media and international media reports – but only to the extent they have outreach in the island. Those who rely on local newspapers, radio and TV had to settle for ‘radio silence’ while media gatekeepers hesitated and held back.

I covered the same ground in my English column last week:
When Worlds Collide #112: Social Media ‘Candles’ for Mainstream Media Blackouts

Only candid voices in Sri Lanka's mainstream media these days come from political cartoonists!

Only candid voices in Sri Lanka’s mainstream media these days come from political cartoonists!

‘‘කොහොමද වැඬේ? අන්න ඔහේලා ආවඩපු සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ එකතු වෙලා රට ගිනි තියනවා!’’

අළුත්ගම හා බේරුවල ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය ඇති වී පැය 48ක් ඉක්ම යන්නට කලින් මා අමතා මෙසේ කීවේ සරසවියක ඇදුරුකමක් දරන උගතෙක්.

ඔහුගේ ‘‘චෝදනාව’’ වූයේ අළුත්ගම ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය පිළිබඳ තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප ට්විටර් (Twitter) හා ෆේස්බුක් (Facebook) වැනි ප‍්‍රකට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා අධිවේගීව සංසරණය වන බවත්, ඒ හරහා ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩ ක‍්‍රියා වෙනත් ප‍්‍රදේශවලටත් පැතිර යා හැකි බවත්. අඩු වැඩි වශයෙන් මේ ආකාරයේ ප‍්‍රකාශ තවත් බොහෝ දෙනකු මෑත දිනවල කරනු මා ඇසුවා.

අළුත්ගම ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය සිදු වූ ජුනි 15 ඉරිදා සිට පැය 24 – 48ක් ගත වන තුරු ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය එය වාර්තා කළේ ඉතා අඩුවෙන් හා සුපරීක්‍ෂාවෙන්. එයට හේතුව විය හැක්කේ එම පුවත සැලවීමෙන් වෙනත් ප‍්‍රදේශවල ද කලහකාරි ක‍්‍රියා ඇති වේය යන සැකයයි.

මීට අමතරව රජයෙන් නිල වශයෙන් හෝ නිල නොවන මට්ටමින් මාධ්‍යවලට බලපෑම් එල්ල වූවා ද යන්න දන්නේ අදාල මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන් හා හිමිකරුවන් පමණයි. එබන්දක් වූවා යයි කිසිවකුත් ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ කියා නැති නිසා ඒ ගැන අනුමාන කිරීමේ තේරුමක් නැහැ.

පුවත් පැතිර යා හැකි මාර්ග ගණනාවක් අද මෙරට තිබෙනවා. ජංගම දුරකථන ව්‍යාප්තිය නිසා බහුතරයක් ලෙහෙසියෙන් දුරකථනයක් භාවිතා කිරීමේ හැකියාව ලබා තිබෙනවා. මිලියන් 20.5ක් වන ලාංකික ජනගහනයට ජංගම දුරකථන ගිනුම් මිලියන 20ක් පමණ හා ස්ථාවර දුරකථන මිලියන් 2.7ක් පමණ තිබෙනවා.

මෑත වසරවල ඇමතුම් ගාස්තු පහළ වැටීම නිසාත්, SMS ඊටත් වඩා අඩු වියදම් සහිත වීම නිසාත් අද පෙරට වඩා දුරකථන හරහා ලාංකිකයන් සන්නිවේදනය කරනවා. රටේ එක් තැනෙක ප‍්‍රබල සිදුවීමක් ඇති වූ විට මාධ්‍ය එය වාර්තා කළත්, නැතත් දුරකථන හරහා පෞද්ගලික මට්ටමින් පැතිර යාමේ ඉඩ පෙර කවරදාකටත් වඩා අද ඉහළයි.

එබඳු පෞද්ගලික තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවේදී අතිශයෝක්ති, විකෘති වීම් හා ප‍්‍රබන්ධකරණය ද එයට එක් වීමේ ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය නිසි වේලාවට රටට ම තොරතුරු බෙදා දුන්නා නම් දුරකථන හා නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා යම් සන්නිවේදන සිදු වීමෙන් ඇතිවන සමාජ හානිය සමනය කර ගත හැකිව තිබුණා.

Awantha Artigala cartoon on media manufacturing dead ropes in Lanka

Awantha Artigala cartoon on media manufacturing dead ropes in Lanka

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තවමත් අළුත් නිසා ඒවායේ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිත්වය හා සමාජීය බලපෑම ගැන අප සැවොම තවමත් අත්දැකීම් ලබමින් සිටිනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන ඉක්මන් නිගමනවලට එළඹෙන බොහෝ දෙනකු ඒ ගැන ගවේෂණාත්මක අධ්‍යයනයකින් නොව මතු පිටින් පැතිකඩ කිහිපයක් කඩිමුඩියේ දැකීමෙන් එසේ කරන අයයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යනු බහුවිධ හා සංකීර්ණ සංසිද්ධියක්. එය හරි කලබලකාරී වේදිකාවක් නැතහොත් විවෘත පොළක් වගෙයි. අලෙවි කිරීමක් නැති වුවත් ඝෝෂාකාරී හා කලබලකාරී පොලක ඇති ගතිසොබාවලට සමාන්තර බවක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වනවා.

එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයත් අතිශයින් විවිධාකාරයි. එහි සංසරණය වන හා බෙදා ගන්නා සියල්ල ග‍්‍රහණය කරන්නට කිසිවකුටත් නොහැකියි.

ෆේස්බුක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලයේ පමණක් ගිනුම් හිමියන් මිලියන් එක හමාරකට වඩා මෙරට සිටිනවා. එහෙත් එහි බොහොමයක් සාමීචි සංවෘතව සිදු වන නිසා මිතුරු ඇරැයුම් ලත් අයට පමණක් ඒවා ග‍්‍රහණය වනවා.

නමුත් ට්විටර් වේදිකාව කාටත් විවෘතයි. මෙරට ට්විටර් භාවිත කරන සංඛ්‍යාව පිළිබඳ නිශ්චිත සංඛ්‍යාලේඛණ නැහැ. 2013 මැදදී එක් ඇස්තමේන්තුවක් වූයේ 14,000ක් පමණ බවයි. මේ වන විට එය විසි දහසකට වැඩි විය හැකියි. එක ට්විටර් පණිවුඩයක් (ට්වීට් එකක්) අකුරු හෝ වෙනත් සංකේත 140කට සීමා වනවා. එබඳු සීමාවක් තුළ වුව ද සූක්‍ෂම හා ව්‍යක්ත ලෙස පණිවුඩ දිය හැකියි.

ට්විටර් මාධ්‍යයේ ගිනුමක් විවෘත කළ විට තමන් කැමති අන් ට්විටර් භාවිත කරන්නන් කියන කරන දේ ස්වයංකී‍්‍රයව නිරික්සිය හැකියි (follow). ක‍්‍රීඩා, චිත‍්‍රපට හෝ වෙනත් ක්‍ෂෙත‍්‍රවල නමක් දිනා ගත් ප‍්‍රකට පුද්ගලයන් හා දේශපාලන නායකයන්ගේ ට්විටර් අනුගාමික සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩියි.

උදා: 2014 ජුනි 22දා වන විට මහේල ජයවර්ධනට අනුගාමිකයන් 110,000ක්, කුමාර් සංගක්කාරට ලක්‍සයක් හා ජනාධිපති මහින්ද රාජපක්‍ෂගේ නිල ට්විටර් ගිනුමට අනුගාමිකයන් 38,000ක් පමණ සිටියා. අනුගාමිකයන් වැඩි දෙනකු සිටින අයකු කියන දේ වඩා ඉක්මනින් ප‍්‍රතිරාවය වී පැතිරෙන්නට ඉඩකඩ වැඩියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ආවේණික වූ විශ්වාසය තක්සේරු වීමේ ක‍්‍රමවේද තිබෙනවා. ඒ අනුව අනුගාමික සංඛ්‍යාව පමණක් නොව ට්වීට් පණිවුඩ ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කැරෙන වාර ගණන හා ආකර්ෂණය වන පාඨක අවධානය ආදී සාධක සැළකිල්ලට ගෙන කෙනකුගේ ට්විටර් බලපෑම (influence) ස්වයංකී‍්‍රයව ගණන් බැලෙනවා. මහජන විශ්වාසය (trust) යන්න හැමට ම දිනා ගත හැකි ගුණයක් නොවෙයි.

අළුත්ගම සිදුවීම්වලට රජයේ නිල ප‍්‍රතිචාරය වූයේ එවකට බොලීවියාවේ සංචාරයක යෙදී සිටි ජනාධිපතිවරයා සිය ට්විටර් ගිනුමෙන් නිකුත් කළ කෙටි පණිවුඩ කිහිපයක්. ජනාධිපතිවරයා (හෝ ඔහුගේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය) ජුනි 15 වනදා ඉංග‍්‍රීසියෙන් ට්විට් පණිවුඩ 2ක් ද, ජුනි 16 වනදා සිංහලෙන් ට්වීට් 2ක් හා දෙමළෙන් ට්වීට් 3ක් ද නිකුත් කළා.

සිංහල ට්වීට් පණිවුඩ වූයේ ‘‘නීතිය සිය අතට ගැනීමට රජය විසින් කිසිවකුට ඉඩ නොතබන අතර, මා සියළු දෙනාගෙන් සංයමයෙන් යුතුව කටයුතු කරන මෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටිමි’’. දෙවැනි පණිවුඩය ‘‘අලූත්ගම සිද්ධියට සම්බන්ධ පුද්ගලයන් නීතිය ඉදිරියට පැමිණවීමට පරික්‍ෂණයක් පවත්වනු ලැබේ’’

මෙරට ජන ගහනයෙන් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන 20-25%ක ප‍්‍රමාණයට පමණක් ග‍්‍රහණය වන මේ පණිවුඩ එබඳු අවස්ථාවක රජයේ නිල ප‍්‍රතිචාරය ලෙස ප‍්‍රමාණවත් නොවූ බව මගේ අදහසයි. රටේ 75-85% ගෘහස්ථයන්ගේ හමුවන ටෙලිවිෂන් හා රේඩියෝ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ද කෙටියෙන් වුවත් සන්සුන්ව සිටීමේ ආයාචනයක් කළ හැකිව තිබුණා. මෙබඳු අවස්ථාවල ඉහළ මට්ටමේ, වගකිවයුතු කෙනකුගේ කට හඬින්ම පණිවුඩයක් ඇසීමට අද සමාජය පුරුදු වී සිටිනවා (ආපදාවක් වූ විට විෂය භාර අමාත්‍යවරයා ප‍්‍රකාශයක් කරන්නා සේ).

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ජුනි 16-17 දිනවල තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප ගලා ගියේ ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය ඒ ගැන මුනිවත රකිමින් සිටි පසුබිම තුළයි. මීට පරම්පරාවකට හෝ දෙකකට පෙර නම් ඕනෑකමින් පුවත් අන්ධකාරයක් (media blackout) ටික දිනකට හෝ පවත්වා ගැනීමට හැකි වුණා. මන්ද තැපෑල හැරුණ විට පෞද්ගලික මට්ටමින් තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවට අවශ්‍ය තරම් දුරකථන හා වෙනත් මාධ්‍ය නොතිබීම නිසා.

එහෙත් 21 වන සියවසේ ටෙලිවිෂන්, රේඩියෝ හා පුවත්පත් වෙතින් එවන් පුවත් අන්ධකාරයක් මතු වූ විට ජනතාව ජංගම දුරකථන හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙත යොමු වනවා.

Mainstream and citizen journalists in Sri Lanka contrasted by Gihan De Chickera of Daily Mirror

Mainstream and citizen journalists in Sri Lanka contrasted by Gihan De Chickera of Daily Mirror

First Post (India): 17 June 2014: Social media breaks Sri Lankan media’s shameful silence

ප‍්‍රමිතියක් සහිතව සමබරව පුවත් සන්නිවේදනයට පුහුණුව ලැබූ මාධ්‍යවේදීන් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ සිටියත් මේ විකල්ප සන්නිවේදනයට යොමු වන බොහෝ දෙනකුට එබන්දක් නැහැ. එනිසා තොරතුරු විකෘති වීමට ඉඩ වැඩියි. ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය අත්‍යවශ්‍යම වූ මොහොතක නිහඬවීමේ අවදානම මෙයයි.

අලූත්ගම සිදුවීම් ගැන වෙබ් අඩවි, ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් හරහා කම්පාවට පත් රටවැසියන් අදහස් දැක්වූවා. මෙය ඔවුන් අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනයට තමන්ට ඇති පුරවැසි අයිතිය යොදා ගැනීමක්.

අජිත් පැරකුම් ජයසිංහ හා මාතලන් වැනි ප‍්‍රමුඛ පෙළේ සිංහල බ්ලොග් රචකයන් හරවත් ලෙස මේ සිදුවීම් විග‍්‍රහ කළා. සුචරිතවාදී නොවී, අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස හැඟීම්බර නොවී ජාතීන් හා ආගම් අතර සමගිය පවත්වා ගැනීමේ වැදගත්කම ගැන ඔවුන් කථා කළා.

ට්විටර් යොදා ගනුනේ Breaking News මට්ටමේ අළුත් තත්ත්ව වාර්තා බෙදා ගන්නයි. ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වයට ලක් වූ ප‍්‍රදේශ හා අවට සිටත්, වෙනත් තැන්වල සිටත් නොයෙක් දෙනා තොරතුරු ට්වීට් කළා.

මේ අතර ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍යවේදීන් ගණනාවක් ද සිටියා. සමහරුන් මෙරට සිට ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට වාර්තා කරන අයයි. සිද්ධියක සැබෑ තොරතුරු තහවුරු කර ගෙන පමණක් වාර්තා කිරීම ඔවුන්ගේ මූලික විනය හා ආචාර ධර්මවල කොටසක්. මා නම් ට්විටර් හරහා ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කළේ මෙබඳු විශ්වාස කටයුතු මූලාශ‍්‍රවලින් ආ පුවත් පමණයි. මෙරට සිටින විදේශ වාර්තාකරුවන්ගේ සංගමය සිය ෆේස්බුක් පිටු හරහා අලූත්ගම සිදුවීම්වලට අදාල ක්‍ෂෙත‍්‍ර ඡායාරූප රැසක් මුදා හැරියා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හා පුරවැසි මාධ්‍ය ගැන පර්යේෂණ කරන සංජන හත්තොටුව මේ ගැන කීවේ ‘‘ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය කුමන හෝ හේතුවක් නිසා අලූත්ගම ගැන නිහඬව සිටියා. ඒවායේ සේවය කරන සමහර මාධ්‍යවේදීන් සිදුවීම වූ ප‍්‍රදේශයට ගොස් තොරතුරු රැස් කළත් ඒවා ප‍්‍රකාශ කිරීමට මුල් දෙදින තුළ ඉඩක් තිබුණේ නැහැ. ඒ තොරතුරු සමහරක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය දිගේ ගලා ගියත් බහුතරයක් අපේ ජනතාව සිදුවීම් ගැන දැන ගත්තේ කල් ගත වීයි.’’

ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට වාර්තා කරන අමන්ත පෙරේරා කීවේ තොරතුරු දැන ගන්නට තිබූ ප‍්‍රධානතම මූලාශ‍්‍රය බවට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පත්වූයේ ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය මුළුගැන්වුණු නිසා බවයි.

ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අතර බෙදීම බොඳ වී ගොස් බිඳ වැටුණු බව මගේ වැටහීමයි. එය හොඳ ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. අපේ ජන සමාජයට අවශ්‍ය කඩිනමින් නිවැරදි හා සමබර තොරතුරු දැන ගැනීමටයි. එය කුමන හෝ මාධ්‍යයක් හරහා ලැබේ නම් එයට ඉක්මනින් මහජන පිළිගැනීමක් ගොඩ නැගෙනවා. තොරතුරු අන්ධකාරයක් පවත්වා ගනිමින් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහය කර ගත්තේ තමන්ටම හානියක්.

Stand Up Against Racismප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය, ජාතිවාදය හා ආගම්වාදයට එරෙහිව ජනමතය ප‍්‍රකාශ කරන හා සාමකාමී ජනයා එක්සත් කරන තැනක් බවට ද සයිබර් අවකාශය පත්ව තිබෙනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය රට ගිනි තබනවා යයි චෝදනා කරන්නෝ නොදකින අනෙක් පැත්ත මෙයයි.

තව දුරටත් ප‍්‍රභූන්ට හා ඉසුරුබර උදවියට පමණක් සීමා නොවූ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය වඩාත් සමාජගත වෙත්ම ජාතීන් අතර සහජීවනය, සමාජ සාධාරණය හා යහපාලනය වැනි සාරධර්ම සඳහා පොදු ජනතාව දැනුවත් කරන්නට හා පෙළ ගස්වන්නට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගත හැකියි. මෙය අසල්වැසි ඉන්දියාව, පාකිස්ථානය හා නේපාලය වැනි රටවල දැනටමත් සිදු වන්නක්.

අවසාන විනිශ්චයේදී සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් යනු සන්නිවේදනයට ඉඩ සලසන වේදිකා පමණයි. වේදිකාවට පිවිසෙන අය වියරුවෙන් හා අසංවරව මොර දෙන අවස්ථා තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් වාචාලයන්ට දේශපාලන වේදිකා උරුම කොට දී සංවේදී හා සංවර වූවන් බැස ගියා සේ සයිබර් අවකාශය ද අන්තවාදී ටික දෙනකුට ඉතිරි කොට සෙසු අප ඉක්ම නොයා යුතුයි. මේ සයිබර් වේදිකා හුදී ජන යහපතට හා යහ පාලනයට හැකි තාක් යොදා ගත යුතුයි.

සිහි තබා ගත යුතු අනෙක් කරුණ නම් විවෘතව අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනයට හා තොරතුරු ගලා යාමට බාධක රැසක් පවතින අප සමාජයේ සාපේක්‍ෂව අළුතින් මතුව ආ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වැනි මාධ්‍යයක් අනවශ්‍ය රාජ්‍ය නියාමනයට හෝ වාරණයට නතු වීම වළක්වා ගත යුතු බවයි.

අසභ්‍ය හා අපහාසාත්මක දේ සමාජගත වීම වැළැක්වීමට යයි කියමින් ඇතැම් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙබ් අඩවිවලට පිවිසිම අවහිර කිරීම (website blocking) ඇරඹුණේ 2007දී. එහෙත් මේ වන විට ස්වාධීන දේශපාලන විග‍්‍රහයන් හා මතවාද රැගත් වෙබ් අඩවි ගණනාවක් ද අවහිර කරනවා. අධිකරණ අධීක්‍ෂණයකින් තොරව, හරිහැටි නීතිමය රාමුවක් නොමැතිව කරන මෙය සයිබර් වාරණයක්.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සංවරව හා වගකීමෙන් යුතුව භාවිත කිරීම අත්‍යවශ්‍ය වන්නේ එසේ නැති වූ විට අපේ පොදු යහපතට යයි කියමින් ඕනෑවට වඩා නියාමනයක් හා වාරණයක් කරන්නට රාජ්‍ය තන්ත‍්‍රය ඉදිරිපත් වීමේ අවදානමක් ඇති නිසයි.

See also: 30 Years Ago: How ICTs Are Changing Sri Lanka

BqQN4IxCIAEKHnW.jpg large

 

 

Posted in Blogging, Broadcasting, Cartoons, Citizen journalism, citizen media, Communicating disasters, digital media, good governance, ICT, Internet, Journalism, Media, Media activism, Media freedom, New media, News, Political violence, public interest, Ravaya Column, Sri Lanka, Television, Violence, Writing. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Can the Development Community catch up with Nelson Mandela?

Op-ed essay originally published by the Communications Initiative (CI) on 12 Dec 2013 and reprinted in Ceylon Today  newspaper on 17 Dec 2013.

Image courtesy - ICTD Cape Town 2013 website

Image courtesy – ICTD Cape Town 2013 website

Nelson Mandela was not only an effective communicator, but also a champion of communication for development.

He spoke and wrote with conviction and empathy, which in turn enhanced his credibility and appeal. He changed history with his careful choice of words and images delivered with the right degree of passion. Social communicators can learn much from him.

However, his communications prowess extended beyond thoughtful prose and skillful oratory. He also understood the power of mass media in today’s information society — and used it well for nation building.

When they are in office, many political leaders of the majority world tend to overuse or misuse the media, for example by forcing public broadcasters to peddle ruling party propaganda. During his term as South Africa’s president, Mandela carefully avoided such excesses.

Instead, he strategically tapped the country’s pluralistic broadcast media to unify the divided nation. Clint Eastwood’s 2009 movie Invictus re-enacted a highlight of that approach.

As a policy maker, Mandela grasped the role of communication in development – both the concepts and delivery tools.

He promoted the use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) as part of socio-economic development in Africa and elsewhere.

The International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the UN agency promoting and tracking the progress of information society, recently saluted Mandela for having been a firm supporter of ICTs as a catalyst for social change and economic development.

At the same time, Mandela’s vision went beyond mere gadgets and telecom networks. Speaking at the ITU Telecom World in Geneva in 1995, he underlined the importance of communication and access to information to human beings. He called for eliminating the divide between information-rich and information-poor countries.

Three years later, while hosting ITU Telecom Africa in Johannesburg, President Mandela said: “As the information revolution gathers yet more pace and strikes deeper roots, it is already redefining our understanding of the world. Indeed, the speed of technological innovation could bring the ideal of the global village sooner than we thought possible. For the developing world, this brings both opportunity and challenge.”

Lofty statements like these are common at policy gatherings. But Mandela went further – and believed that communication should be seen as a basic human need. That set him apart from many members in the development community who have long considered it a secondary need.

Although it has been discussed for centuries, there is no universally accepted definition of basic human needs. During the 1970s, basic needs emerged as a key topic in development debates. Various studies — catalysed by UN agencies and the Club of Rome – tried to define it.

In 1976, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) prepared a report that identified basic needs as food, clothing, housing, education and public transportation. It partially drew on ILO’s country reports on Columbia, Kenya and Sri Lanka.

Since then, different development agencies have adopted variations of the original ILO list. National planners have used the concept to benchmark economic growth.

The ground reality has changed drastically since those heady days. About a year ago, I asked Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression, if communication should be considered a basic human need. He welcomed the idea, especially in view of rapid evolution of information society.

I soon found that Mandela had thought of it years earlier. Perhaps because he had such limited access to communication during his long years in prison, he appreciated its central value to all human beings.

You Can Hear Me Now - book coverIn a 2007 book titled You Can Hear Me Now: How Microloans and Cell Phones are Connecting the World’s Poor to the Global Economy, US writer Nicholas Sullivan quotes Mandela saying in a 1995 speech: “The desire to be in touch lies deep within us. It is a basic need.”

That remark, made while opening a mobile telecom network, was rather perceptive. At the time, less than 1 per cent of all Africans had access to a fixed phone, and there were only around one million mobile phones on the continent of 800 million.

Since then, mobile phones and other low-cost digital tools have spread phenomenally, transforming lives and livelihoods across the majority world. Sullivan calls it an external combustion engine: “a combination of forces that is sparking economic growth and lifting people out of poverty in countries long dominated by aid-dependent governments.”

While the market and society have marched ahead, many development professionals are still stuck in obsolete development paradigms. That is probably why some worry that there are more mobile phones than toilets in India. (So what? Mobiles are personal devices; toilets are a shared household amenity. Comparing their numbers is meaningless.)

It’s high time we revisited basic human needs and redefined them to suit current realities. The development community must finally catch up with Nelson Mandela.

Science journalist and development communicator Nalaka Gunawardene has been following social and cultural impacts of ICTs for over 20 years. 

Can Development Community Catch up with Nelson Mandela - Ceylon Today, 17 Dec 2013

Can Development Community Catch up with Nelson Mandela – Ceylon Today, 17 Dec 2013

Political Satire: When making fun is no laughing matter

Paper paper shining bright...but for how long? Cartoon by Mike Luckovich

My regular readers know my deep interest in political satire, and fascination with cartoons of all kinds including those political. On this blog, we’ve also discussed the worldwide decline in mainstream journalism.

I’ve just blended my thoughts in these strands in my latest op ed essay, ostensibly a book review. It has just been published by Groundviews.org as Political Satire in Sri Lanka: When Making Fun is No Laughing Matter

Here are the opening paras:

Political satire is nothing new: it has been around for as long as organised government, trying to keep the wielders of power in check. Over the centuries, it has manifested in many oral, literary or theatrical traditions, some of it more enduring — such as Gulliver’s Travels and Animal Farm. And for over a century, political cartoonists have also been doing it with such brilliant economy of words. Together, these two groups probably inspire more nightmares in tyrants than anyone or anything else.

“Today, political satire has also emerged as a genre on the airwaves and in cyberspace, and partly compensates for the worldwide decline in serious and investigative journalism. Many mainstream media outlets have become too submissive and subservient to political and corporate powers. Those who still have the guts often lack the resources and staff to pursue good journalism.

“If Nature abhors a vacuum, so does human society — and both conjure ways of quickly filling it up. Into this ‘journalism void’ have stepped two very different groups of people: citizen journalists, who take advantage of the new information and communications technologies (ICTs), and political satirists who revive the ancient arts of caricaturisation and ego-blasting…”

In this essay, I revisit a question I first posed in my July 2009 blog post: News wrapped in laughter: Is this the future of current affairs journalism?

Read the full essay:
Political Satire in Sri Lanka: When Making Fun is No Laughing Matter

You might also like to look at these other related blog posts:

August 2009: The XYZ Show: New horizon in political satire on African TV, but room to grow?

Sep 2009: XYZ Show controversy: Kenyan politicians forgetting ‘Hakuna matata’?

Confessions of a Digital Immigrant: Reflections on mainstream and new media

The Digital Native: Was there a life before the Internet, Dad?

In early August 2009, I talked to a captive audience of media owners, senior journalists and broadcasters in Colombo about the ‘digital tsunami’ now sweeping across the media world. (It has been reported and discussed in a number of blog posts on Aug 6, Aug 7, Aug 8 and Aug 31).

As I later heard, some in my audience had mistakenly believed that I was advocating everything going entirely online. Actually, I wasn’t. I like to think that both the physical and virtual media experiences enrich us in their own ways. Real world is never black and white; it’s always a mix or hybrid of multiple processes or influences.

So I’ve just revisited the topic. I adapted part of the talk, and included more personalised insights, and wrote an essay titled ‘Confessions of a Digital Immigrant‘, which has just been published on Groundviews, the path-breaking citizen journalism initiative.

It opens with these words:

“My daughter Dhara, 13, finds it incredible that I had never seen a working television until I had reached her current age — that’s when broadcast television was finally introduced in Sri Lanka, in April 1979. It is also totally inconceivable to her that my entire pre-teen media experience was limited to newspapers and a single, state-owned radio station.

“And she simply doesn’t believe me when I say — in all honesty and humility — that I was already 20 when I first used a personal computer, 29 when I bought my first mobile phone, and 30 when I finally got wired. In fact, my first home Internet connectivity — using a 33kbps dial-up modem — and our daughter arrived just a few weeks apart in mid 1996. I have never been able to decide which was more disruptive…

Groundviews: 1,000 posts and counting...“Dhara (photographed above, in mid 2007) is growing up taking completely for granted the digital media and tools of our time. My Christmas presents to her in the past three years have been a basic digital camera, an i-pod and a mobile phone, each of which she mastered with such dexterity and speed. It amazes me how she keeps up with her Facebook, chats with friends overseas on Skype and maintains various online accounts for images, designs and interactive games. Yet she is a very ordinary child, not a female Jimmy Neutron.

“Despite my own long and varied association with information and communication technologies (ICTs), I know I can never be the digital native that Dhara so effortlessly is. No matter how well I mimic the native ‘accent’ or how much I fit into the bewildering new world that I now find myself in, I shall forever be a digital immigrant.”

Read the full essay ‘Confessions of a Digital Immigrant’ on Groundviews…