[Op-ed] Major Reforms Needed to Rebuild Public Trust in Sri Lanka’s Media

Text of an op-ed essay published in the Sunday Observer on 10 July 2016:

Major Reforms Needed to Rebuild Public Trust

in Sri Lanka’s Media

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s government and its media industry need to embark on wide-ranging media sector reforms, says a major new study released recently.

Such reforms are needed at different levels – in government policies, laws and regulations, as well as within the media industry and profession. Media educators and trainers also have a key role to play in raising professional standards in our media, the study says.

Recent political changes have opened a window of opportunity which needs to be seized urgently by everyone who desires a better media in Sri Lanka, urges the study report, titled Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka.

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

The report was released on World Press Freedom Day (May 3) at a Colombo meeting attended by the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition and Minister of Mass Media.

The report is the outcome of a 14-month-long research and consultative process. Facilitated by the Secretariat for Media Reforms, it engaged over 500 media professionals, owners, managers, academics, relevant government officials and members of various media associations and trade unions. It offers a timely analysis, accompanied by policy directions and practical recommendations. I served as is overall editor.

“The country stands at a crossroads where political change has paved the way for strengthening safeguards for freedom of expression (FOE) and media freedom while enhancing the media’s own professionalism and accountability,” the report notes.

Politicians present at the launch could only agree.

“The government is willing to do its part for media freedom and media reforms. But are you going to do yours?” he asked the dozens of editors, journalists and media managers present. There were no immediate answers.

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe speaks at the launch of 'Rebuilding Public Trust' report in Colombo, 3 May 2016 (Photo courtesy SLPI)

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe speaks at the launch of ‘Rebuilding Public Trust’ report in Colombo, 3 May 2016 (Photo courtesy SLPI)

Whither Media Professionalism?

The report acknowledges how, since January 2015, the new government has taken several positive steps. These include: reopening investigations into some past attacks on journalists; ending the arbitrary and illegal blocking of political websites done by the previous regime; and recognising access to information as a fundamental right in the 19th Amendment to the Constitution (after the report was released, the Right to Information Act has been passed by Parliament, which enables citizens to exercise this right).

These and other measures have helped improve Sri Lanka’s global ranking by 24 points in the World Press Freedom Index (https://rsf.org/en/ranking). It went up from a dismal 165 in 2015 index (which reflected conditions that prevailed in 2014) to a slightly better 141 in the latest index.

Compiled annually by Reporters Without Borders (RSF), a global media rights advocacy group, the Index reflects the degree of freedom that journalists, news organisations and netizens (citizens using the web) enjoy in a country, and the efforts made by its government to respect and nurture this freedom.

Sri Lanka, with a score of 44.96, has now become 141st out of 180 countries assessed. While we have moved a bit further away from the bottom, we are still in the company of Burma (143), Bangladesh (144) and South Sudan (140) – not exactly models of media freedom.

Clearly, much more needs be done to improve FOE and media freedom in Sri Lanka – and not just by the government. Media owners and managers also bear a major responsibility to create better working conditions for journalists and other media workers. For example, by paying better wages to journalists, and allowing trade union rights (currently denied in many private media groups, though enjoyed in all state media institutions).

Rebuilding Public Trust acknowledges these complexities and nuances: freedom from state interference is necessary, but not sufficient, for a better and pluralistic media.

It also points out that gradual improvement in media freedom must now to be matched by an overall upping of media’s standards and ethical conduct.

By saying so, the report turns the spotlight on the media itself — an uncommon practice in our media. It says that only a concerted effort by the entire media industry and all its personnel can raise professional standards and ethical conduct of Sri Lanka’s media.

A similar sentiment is expressed by Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, an experienced journalist turned media trainer who was part of the report’s editorial team (and has since become the Director General of the Department of Information). “Sri Lanka’s media freedom has gone up since January 2015, but can we honestly say there has been much (or any) improvement in our media’s level of professionalism?” he asks.

Media in Crisis

Tackling the dismally low professionalism on a priority basis is decisive for the survival of our media which points fingers at all other sections of society but rarely engages in self reflection.

Rebuilding Public Trust comes out at a time when Sri Lanka’s media industry and profession face many crises stemming from an overbearing state, unpredictable market forces and rapid technological advancements. Balancing the public interest and commercial viability is one of the media sector’s biggest challenges today.

The report says: “As the existing business models no longer generate sufficient income, some media have turned to peddling gossip and excessive sensationalism in the place of quality journalism. At another level, most journalists and other media workers are paid low wages which leaves them open to coercion and manipulation by persons of authority or power with an interest in swaying media coverage.”

Notwithstanding these negative trends, the report notes that there still are editors and journalists who produce professional content in the public interest while also abiding by media ethics.

Unfortunately, their good work is eclipsed by media content that is politically partisan and/or ethnically divisive.

For example, much of what passes for political commentary in national newspapers is nothing more than gossip. Indeed, some newspapers now openly brand content as such!

Similarly, research for this study found how most Sinhala and Tamil language newspapers cater to the nationalism of their respective readerships instead of promoting national integrity.

Such drum beating and peddling of cheap thrills might temporarily boost market share, but these practices ultimately erode public trust in the media as a whole. Surveys show fewer media consumers actually believing that they read, hear or watch.

One result: younger Lankans are increasingly turning to entirely web-based media products and social media platforms for obtaining their information as well as for speaking their minds. Newspaper circulations are known to be in decline, even though there are no independently audited figures.

If the mainstream media is to reverse these trends and salvage itself, a major overhaul of media’s professional standards and ethics is needed, and fast. Newspaper, radio and TV companies also need clarity and a sense of purpose on how to integrate digital platforms into their operations (and not as mere add-ons).

L to R - Lars Bestle of IMS, R Sampanthan, Ranil Wickremesinghe, Karu Paranawithana, Gayantha Karunathilake with copies of new study report on media reforms - Photo by Nalaka Gunawardene

L to R – Lars Bestle of IMS, R Sampanthan, Ranil Wickremesinghe, Karu Paranawithana, Gayantha Karunathilake with copies of new study report on media reforms – Photo by Nalaka Gunawardene

Recommendations for Reforms

The report offers a total of 101 specific recommendations, which are sorted under five categories. While many are meant for the government, a number of important recommendations are directed at media companies, journalists’ and publishers’ associations, universities, media training institutions, and development funding agencies.

“We need the full engagement of all stakeholders in building a truly free, independent and public interest minded pluralistic media system as a guarantor of a vibrant democracy in Sri Lanka,” says Wijayananda Jayaweera, a former director of UNESCO’s Communication Development Division, who served as overall advisor for our research and editorial process.

In fact, this assessment has used an internationally accepted framework developed by UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Known as the Media Development Indicators (MDIs), this helps identify strengths and weaknesses, and propose evidence-based recommendations on how to enhance media freedom and media pluralism in a country. Already, two dozen countries have used this methodology.

The Sri Lanka study was coordinated by the Secretariat for Media Reforms, a multistakeholder alliance comprising the Ministry of Parliamentary Reforms and Mass Media; Department of Mass Media at University of Colombo; Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI); Strategic Alliance for Research and Development (SARD); and International Media Support (IMS) of Denmark.

We carried out a consultative process that began in March 2015. Activities included a rapid assessment discussed at the National Summit for Media Reforms in May 2015 (attended by over 200), interviews with over 40 key media stakeholders, a large sample survey, brainstorming sessions, and a peer review process that involved over 250 national stakeholders and several international experts.

Nalaka Gunawardene, Editor of Rebuilding Public Trust in Media Report, presents key findings at launch event in Colombo, 3 May 2016 - (Photo courtesy SLPI)

Nalaka Gunawardene, Editor of Rebuilding Public Trust in Media Report, presents key findings at launch event in Colombo, 3 May 2016 – (Photo courtesy SLPI)

Here is the summary of key recommendations:

  • Law review and revision: The government should review all existing laws which impose restrictions on freedom of expression with a view to amending them as necessary to ensure that they are fully consistent with international human rights laws and norms.
  • Right to Information (RTI): The RTI law should be implemented effectively, leading to greater transparency and openness in the public sector and reorienting how government works.
  • Media ownership: Adopt new regulations making it mandatory for media ownership details to be open, transparent and regularly disclosed to the public.
  • Media regulation: Repeal the Press Council Act 5 of 1973, and abolish the state’s Press Council. Instead, effective self-regulatory arrangements should be made ideally by the industry and covering both print and broadcast media.
  • Broadcast regulation: New laws are needed to ensure transparent broadcast licensing; more rational allocation of frequencies; a three-tier system of public, commercial and community broadcasters; and obligations on all broadcasters to be balanced and impartial in covering politics and elections. An independent Broadcasting Authority should be set up.
  • Digital broadcasting: The government should develop a clear plan and timeline for transitioning from analogue to digital broadcasting in television as soon as possible.
  • Restructuring state media: The three state broadcasters should be transformed into independent public service broadcasters with guaranteed editorial independence. State-owned Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited (Lake House) should be operated independently with editorial freedom.
  • Censorship: No prior censorship should be imposed on any media. Where necessary, courts may review media content for legality after publication. Laws and regulations that permit censorship should be reviewed and amended.
  • Blocking of websites: The state should not limit online content or social media activities in ways that contravene freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution and international conventions.
  • Privacy and surveillance: Privacy of all citizens and others should be respected by the state and the media. There should be strict limits to the state surveillance of private individuals and entities’ phone and other electronic communications.
  • Media education and literacy: Journalism and mass media education courses at tertiary level should be reviewed and updated to meet current industry needs and consumption patterns. A national policy is needed for improving media literacy and cyber literacy.

Full report in English is available at: https://goo.gl/5DYm9i

Sinhala and Tamil versions are under preparation and will be released shortly.

Science writer and media researcher Nalaka Gunawardene served as overall editor of the new study, and also headed one of the four working groups that guided the process. He tweets as: @NalakaG

Advertisements

Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

“Sri Lanka wants to make a new Constitution in a radically different way. It is poised to become the first developing country in the world to ‘crowd-source’ ideas for making the highest law of the land.

“That is all well and good – as long as the due process is followed, and that process has intellectual rigour, transparency and integrity. Therein lies the big challenge.”

So opens my latest op-ed essay, just published by Groundviews.org

Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

In it, I describe the experience of Iceland which was the world’s first country to ‘crowd-source’ a new Constitution. From 2011 to 2013, the European nation of 330,000 people engaged in an exercise of direct democracy to come up with a modern Constitution to replace the existing one adopted in 1944. That involved many public hearings as well as using social media and other communications platforms to gather public inputs and to ensure public scrutiny.

Facebook was used as part of a public consultation strategy to draft Iceland's new Constitution in 2011-13

Facebook was used as part of a public consultation strategy to draft Iceland’s new Constitution in 2011-13

This is the path that Sri Lanka has now chosen: open and participatory Constitution making. To be sure, tropical Sri Lanka is vastly different. Its population of 21 million is 60 times larger than Iceland’s. But the Arctic nation’s generic lessons are well worth studying – both for inspiration and precaution.

I point out: “In doing so, it is important to ensure that public consultative process is not limited to the web and social media. Instead of dominating, technologies should only enable maximum participation.”

“The bottom-line: gathering public proposals is commendable, but not an end by itself. The government needs to adopt a systematic method to study, categorize and distil the essence of what is suggested. And that must happen across English, Sinhala and Tamil languages.”

Read full essay:

Crowd-sourcing a New Constitution for Sri Lanka: Mind the Gaps!

yourconstitution.lk website calls for public inputs for making Sri Lanka's new Constitution.

yourconstitution.lk website calls for public inputs for making Sri Lanka’s new Constitution.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #229: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යුගයේ අපේ දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනය

In this week’s Ravaya column, (in Sinhala, appearing in issue of 26 July 2015), I review how Lankan politicians and political parties are using social media in the run-up to the general election to be held on 17 August 2015.

In particular, I look at how President Maithripala Sirisena and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe are using Facebook and Twitter (mostly to ‘broadcast’ their news and images, and hardly ever to engage citizens). I also remark on two other politicians who have shown initiative in social media use, i.e. former President Mahinda Rajapaksa and JHU leader Champika Ranawaka (both of who have held live Q&As on social media with varying degrees of engagement).

I raise questions like these: Can political parties afford to not engage 25% of Lankan population now regularly using the web? When would election campaigners – rooted in the legacy media’s practice of controlling and fine-tuning messages – come to terms with the unpredictable and sometimes unruly nature of social media?

While politicians, their campaigners and parties struggle to find their niches on social media, politically conscious citizens need to up their game too. Cyber literacy has been slower to spread than mere internet connectivity in Sri Lanka, and we need enlightened and innovative use of social media in the public interest. Every citizen, activist and advocacy group can play a part.

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

ජනගහනයෙන් හතරෙන් එකක් පමණ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන මට්ටමට එළැඹ සිටින අපේ රටේ මෙම සයිබර් සාධකය මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රචාරණයට හා ඡන්දදායක මතයට කෙසේ බලපානවාද යන්න විමසීම වැදගත්.

2010 මහ මැතිවරණයේ භාවිත වූවාට වඩා බෙහෙවින් මෙවර මැතිවරණයේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය සිදුවන බව නම් කල් තබාම කිව හැකියි.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂ, ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්, සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධාන හා සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියන් යන මේ පිරිස් සතරම වෙබ් අඩවි හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වෙත යොමු වීමත් සමග දේශපාලන තොරතුරු හා මතවාද ගලා යෑම පෙර පැවතියාට වඩා වෙනස්වන්නේ කෙලෙසද?

විශේෂයෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත හා පක්ෂවලින් ප‍්‍රශ්න කරන්නට හා ඔවුන් අභියෝගයට ලක් කරන්නට හැකි වීම හරහා දේශපාලන සංවාද වඩා හරවත් විය හැකිද? මෙය කෙතරම් පුළුල්ව රටේ සමාජගත වනවාද?

Twitter and Facebook - leading social media platforms

Twitter and Facebook – leading social media platforms

ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ ජනප‍්‍රියතම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලය ෆේස්බුක් (Facebook). එහි මෙරට ගිණුම් මිලියන් 2.5කට වඩා තිබෙනවා. ව්‍යාජ ගිණුම් හෝ ද්විත්ව ගිණුම් පසෙක තැබුවහොත් අඩු තරමින් මිලියන් 2ක් ලාංකිකයන් ෆේස්බුක් සැරිසරනවා යැයි කිව හැකියි. මෙරට ජනප‍්‍රිය අනෙක් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවන්නේ ට්විටර් (Twitter), වීඩියෝ බෙදා ගන්නා යූටියුබ් (YouTube) හා ඡායාරූප හුවමාරු කැරෙන ඉන්ස්ටග‍්‍රෑම් (Instagram).

මේ හැම සයිබර් වේදිකාවකම මේ දිනවල දේශපාලනයට අදාළ තොරතුරු, මතවාද හා රූප බෙහෙවින් සංසරණය වනවා.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට හා ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්ට මේ යථාර්ථය නොසලකා සිටීමට බැහැ. එහෙත් බොහෝ පක්ෂවල මැතිවරණ කැම්පේන් හසුරුවන්නේ සාම්ප‍්‍රදායික මාධ්‍ය ගැන දන්නා, එහෙත් නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන හරි අවබෝධයක් නැති හිටපු මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හෝ දැන්වීම් ඒජන්සි විසින්.

පත්තරවල මුදල් ගෙවා ඉඩ මිලට ගැනීමට හා රේඩියෝ-ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවල ගුවන් කාලය මිලට ගැනීමට මේ උදවිය හොඳහැටි දන්නවා. මුදලට වඩා කාලය, ශ‍්‍රමය හා නිර්මාණශීලී බව අවශ්‍ය වන සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට නිසි ලෙස ප‍්‍රවේශ වන හැටි මේ අයට වැටහීමක් නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලටත් මුදල් ගෙවා ඕනැම කෙනකුට තම ප‍්‍රචාරය උත්සන්න කර ගත හැකියි. ෆේස්බුක් ගෝලීය වේදිකාවක් වුවත්, තම භාණ්ඩය හෝ සේවාව හෝ පණිවුඩය නිශ්චිත රටක, නිශ්චිත වයස් කාණ්ඩයකට ඉලක්ක කොට පෙන්වීම කර ගත හැකියි.

එසේම ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් සඳහා තොග වශයෙන් ලෝලීන් (fans) හා මනාප (likes) විකුණන විදේශීය සමාගම් තිබෙනවා. අපේ සමහර දේශපාලන චරිත අරඹා ඇති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම්වලට ඔවුන් හීන්සීරුවේ මුදල් ගෙවා මෙසේ තොග පිටින් ලෝලීන් හා මනාප ලබා ගෙන ඇති බව හෙළිව තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලකයන්ට ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ සිටින Fans ගණනටත් වඩා තුර්කියේ සිටින සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩිවීමට හේතුව එයයි.

20 March 2015: Social Media Analysis: Sri Lankan Politicians and Social Media

මුදල් ගෙවා ලබා ගන්නා සමාජ මාධ් රමුඛත්වය විශ්වසනීය හෝ සාර්ථක වන්නේ නැහැ. මෙය කුලියට ගත් බස් රථවලින් මුදල් ගෙවා සෙනග රැළිවලට ගෙනෙනවාට සමානයිග සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාව පුළුල් වන විට මෙබඳු උපක‍්‍රම ගැන වැඩි දෙනකු දැන ගන්නවා.

social-media

කෙටි කාලීනවත් දිගු කාලීනවත් වඩාත් සාර්ථක ප‍්‍රවේශය නම් නිරතුරු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසියන් සමග සාමීචියේ හා සංවාදයේ යෙදී සිටීමයි (මැතිවරණයක් එළැඹි විට පමණක් නොවෙයි).

දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා කැම්පේන්කරුවන් කියන දෙය ඡන්දදායක මහජනතාව වැඳ ගෙන ඔහේ අසා සිටි කාලය ඉවරයි. දැන් මතුව එන්නේ අප කාටත් සංවාද විසංවාද හා තර්ක කළ හැකි නව සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථයක්.

සමාජ ජාල මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන සියලූ ලාංකික දේශපාලකයන් හෝ දේශපාලන පක්ෂ හෝ නිතිපතා ෆලෝ කරන්නට මට හැකි වී නැහැ. එය ලේසි පාසු කාරියක්ද නොවෙයි.

එහෙත් ජනාධිපති මෛත‍්‍රීපාල සිරිසේනගේ නිල ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ද, අගමැති රනිල් වික‍්‍රමසිංහගේ ට්විටර් ගිණුමද හරහා කුමක් සන්නිවේදනය වේද යන්න ගැන මා විමසිලිමත්ව සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

President Sirisena’s verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

කාර්යබහුල මෙවන් නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් පවත්වාගෙන යන්නේ ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් විසින්. එය ලොව පුරා සම්ප‍්‍රදායක්. බොහෝ විට මේ ගිණුම් හරහා නායකයා කරන කියන දේ ගැන සංක්ෂිප්ත තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප/කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හැරෙනවා.

මේ අන්තර්ගතයම නිල වෙබ්අඩවි හා මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රකාශන හරහා ද නිකුත් කැරෙන නමුත් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය පවා අද කාලේ නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් හරහා කියැවෙන දේ ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටිනවා. අවශ්‍ය විටදී යම් දේ එතැනින් උපුටා දක්වනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගත වන දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් මුහුණ දෙන අභියෝග ගණනාවක් තිබෙනවා. මූලික එකක් නම් තමන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් විශ්වාසදායක නිල ගිනුම් (verified accounts) බව තහවුරු කර ගැනීමයි.

ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙබ් අඩවි ලිපිනයන් (URLs) මෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් නාමයන් ද මුලින්ම එය ලියාපදිංචි කරන්නාට හිමි කර ගත හැකියි. රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරිවාදය නැති සයිබර් අවකාශයේ අපූර්වත්වය එය වුවත් එය අවභාවිතයට යොදන අයද සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Twitter account - screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

President Sirisena’s verified Twitter account – screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

 

මෙරට ජනාධිපති හා අගමැති දෙදෙනාගේම නම් පදනම් කර ගෙන ඇරඹූ ව්යාජ ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ඕනෑකමින් අධ්යයනය කළ විට මේවා ව්යාජ බව පෙනී යතත්, බැලූ බැල්මට ජනයා මුලා කිරීමේ හැකියාව තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා රසිද්ධ පුද්ගලයන් (දේශපාලන නායකයන්, සිනමා තරු, රීඩකයන් ආදීන්) අනන්යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ් ගිණුම් සකසා ගැනීමත්, එය පැහැදිලිව පෙන්නුම් කිරීමත් වැදගත්.

පසුගිය ජනාධිපතිවරණයේදී කැම්පේන් වැඩට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යම් පමණකට ඔවුන් යොදා ගත්තද ජනාධිපති සිරිසේන හා අගමැති වික‍්‍රමසිංහ දෙපළටම අනන්‍යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් තිබුණේ නැහැ. මේවායේ අවශ්‍යතාව අප සමහරක් දෙනා ප‍්‍රසිද්ධ අවකාශයේ පෙන්වා නිතර දුන්නා.

මේ අනුව 2015 මැයි මාසයේ පටන් ජනාධිපති සිරිසේනට තහවුරු කරන ලද නිල ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ප‍්‍රමාද වී හෝ මෙය ලබා ගැනීම හිතකර ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. එහෙත් වික‍්‍රමසිංහ නමින් ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ගණනාවක් පවතින අතර එයින් කුමක් ඔහුගේ නිල ගිණුම් ද යන්න තහවුරු කර නැහැ. අපට කළ හැක්කේ අනුමාන පමණයි.

මේ දෙදෙනාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය ද ප‍්‍රශස්ත මට්ටමක නැහැ. ගිය වසර අගදී කැම්පේන් කරන විටත්, ජනාධිපති ලෙස තේරී පත් වූ පසුවත් මෛත‍්‍රිපාල සිරිසේන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන්නේ තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප බෙදාහරින්නට මිස පුරවැසියන් සමග සංවාදයට නොවෙයි.

ජනපතිවරණයට පෙර හා පසු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පිළිතුරු දෙන සජීව සැසි වාරයක් (Live Q&A) කරන මෙන් අප ඉල්ලා සිටියා. මේ වනතුරු එබන්දක් සිදුකර නැහැ. තම ජයග්‍රහනයට උපකාර වූවා යයි ඔහුම ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පැසසූ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප්‍රශ්නවලට මුහුණ දීමට ජනපති සිරිසේන පැකිලෙන්නේ ඇයි?

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account - IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account – IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

වික‍්‍රමසිංහ අගමැතිවරයාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය වඩාත් පසුගාමීයි. ඔහුගේ ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුමෙන් මේ දිනවල ප‍්‍රචාරක රැලිවල ඡායාරූප හා කෙටි කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හරිනවා. එහෙත් රටේ ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන හෝ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති/විසඳුම් ගැන කිසිදු සංවාදයක් පෙනෙන්නට නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත ප‍්‍රචාරණයට එහා යන තවත් බොහෝ දේ කළ හැකියි. මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රකාශයන්ට අදහස් හා යෝජනා ඉල්ලා ලබා ගත හැකියි. රටේ දැවෙන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන (සීරුවෙන් හා ප‍්‍රවේශමෙන්) සංවාද කොට මහජන මතය ගැන දළ හැඟීමක් ලද හැකියි. ඡන්දදායකයන්ගේ රුචි අරුචිකම්, ප‍්‍රමුඛතා හා අපේක්ෂා ගැන ගවේෂණය කළ හැකියි.

ඉන්දියාව, ඉන්දුනීසියාව, තායිලන්තය හා පිලිපීනය වැනි ආසියානු රටවල දේශපාලකයන් හා පක්ෂ මෙසේ වඩාත් හරවත් හා පුළුල් ලෙසින් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගන්නවා.

මැතිවරණ ආසන්න වන විට මිලියන් ගණන් වැය කරමින් ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ පැවැත්වීම දැන් අපේ ප‍්‍රධාන දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලත් සිරිතක්. බොහෝ විට සොයා ගැනීම් ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියට පත් නොකරන මේ සමීක්ෂණවලින් කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ හා අවධාරණය කළ යුතු තැන් ආදිය ගැන යම් ඉඟි ලැබෙන බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් සමීක්ෂකයන් අසන හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයකටම ජනයා අවකංව පිළිතුරු නොදෙන නිසා මේ සමීක්ෂණවල ආවේණික සීමා තිබෙනවා.

එයට වඩා විවෘත ලෙස මත දැක්වීමක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ කැරෙනවා. මේවා විශ්ලේෂණය කරන මෘදුකාංග හරහා යම් සමුච්චිත ප‍්‍රවණතා සොයා ගත හැකියි. එබඳු විශ්ලේෂණ දැන් වෙනත් රටවල දේශපාලන පක්ෂ සන්නිවේදකයෝ කරනවා. ඒ හරහා කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ වඩාත් සමාජගත කර ගත හැකියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල විභවය තේරුම් ගෙන ඇතැයි පෙනෙන ජාතික මට්ටමේ දේශපාලන චරිත දෙකක් නම් මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ හා චම්පික රණවකයි. ඔවුන්ගේ දේශපාලන මතවාදයන් කුමක් වෙතත්, මෙරට සෙසු දේශපාලකයන්ට සාපේක්ෂව ඔවුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා යම් පුරවැසි පිරිසක් සමග සන්නිවේදනය කරනවා. නිතිපතා නොවූවත් විටින් විට හෝ පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පිළිතුරු ද දෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

ගිය වසරේ මේ දෙපළ පැවැත් වූ ට්විටර් ප‍්‍රශ්නෝත්තර සැසිවලදී දුෂ්කර යැයි සැලකිය හැකි අන්දමේ ප‍්‍රශ්න මා ඉදිරිපත් කළා. රාජපක්ෂ එවන් ප‍්‍රශ්න නොතකා හැර ලෙහෙසි යයි පෙනෙන ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පමණක් පිළිතුරු දුන්නා. එහෙත් රණවක ආන්දෝලනාත්මක මාතෘකා ගැන පවා තම මතයේ සිට පිළිතුරු සැපයූවා. එම පිළිතුරු ගැන මා සෑහීමකට පත් නොවූවත් ඔහු එසේ සංවාදයේ නියැලීම මා අගය කරනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල බොරු පුරාජේරු පම්පෝරි කරන්න අමාරුයි. එය භාවිත කරන සමහර පුරවැසියන් ගරුසරු නොවීමට හා සත්‍යවාදී නොවීමට ද ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලන කැම්පේන්කරුවන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සංවාදවලට ඉඩ නොදෙන්නේ මේ අවදානම නිසා විය හැකියි.

දේශපාලන රැස්වීම් වේදිකාවක කථිකයකුට ඉඳහිට හූ හඬක් ලැබිය හැකි වුවත් ඉන් ඔබ්බට යන අභියෝග මතු වන්නේ නැහැ. ටෙලිවිෂන් දේශපාලන සංවාදවලත් මෙහෙයවන්නා විසින් යම් සමනයක් පවත්වා ගන්නවා. මෙබඳු තිරිංග නැති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දුෂ්කර ප‍්‍රශ්න, අවලාද, බොරු චෝදනා හා අපහාස එල්ල විය හැකියි.

එහෙත් පොදු අවකාශයේ සිටින, මහජන නියෝජිතයන් වීමට වරම් පතන දේශපාලකයන් මෙබඳු මහජන රතිචාරවලට මුහුණ දීමේ හැකියාව හා පරිණත බව සමාජ මාධ් හරහා රටටම පෙනෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa's verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa’s verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පරිහරණය කරන පුරවැසි අපටත් වගකීම් තිබෙනවා. අප කැමති දේශපාලන පක්ෂයට හා චරිතවලට සයිබර් සහයෝගය දෙන අතරේ යම් සංයමයක් පවත්වා ගත යුතුයි. ප‍්‍රතිවිරුද්ධ මතධාරීන්ට අසැබි ලෙසින් පහර නොගසා තර්කයට තර්කය මතු කළ යුතුයි. එසේම නොකඩවා ගලා එන විවිධ විග‍්‍රහයන් හා රූප වැඩිදුර පතුරුවන්නට පෙර ඒවා වෛරීය දේශපාලනයට අදාළදැයි මඳක් සිතිය යුතුයි.

මෙරට ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන්නන්ගෙන් 80%කට වඩා එහි රවේශ වන්නේ ස්මාට් ෆෝන් හරහායි. ස්මාට්ෆෝන් තිබුනාට මදි. ස්මාට් පුරවැසියන් වීමටත් ඕනෑ! වැඩවසම් ගතානුගතිකත්වය හා වෛරීය ජාතිකත්වය පසු කර නව දේශපාල සදාචාරයක් බිහි කරන්නට අප දායක විය යුතුයි!

See also other related columns of mine:

16 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #160: දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයෙ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාධකය

23 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #161: සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ඇයි මේ තරම් බය?

21 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #199: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය, මැතිවරණ හා ඩිජිටල් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය

28 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #200: ඩිජිටල් තාක්‍ෂණයෙන් මැතිවරණ ක‍්‍රියාදාමය පිරිසුදු කළ ඉන්දුනීසියාව

4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

 

 

Posted in Broadcasting, Campaigns, digital media, good governance, ICT, India, Indonesia, Internet, Media, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, social media, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Television, YouTube. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Op-ed Essay: The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

This op-ed essay of mine was published in Daily FT newspaper, Sri Lanka, on 16 July 2015.

The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Just when we began to worry that our recently elected head of state had lost his tongue, he broke his silence.

On July 14 evening, President Maithripala Sirisena finally addressed the nation. He spoke calmly and clearly. He was resolute — but with none of the pomp and bravado that characterised his predecessor Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Speech of the President Maithripala Sirisena – 14 July 2015 (in Sinhala)

Sirisena’s speech outlined his key actions and accomplishments since being elected less than 200 days ago in one of the biggest election surprises in Lankan political history. He was mildly defensive of his low-key style of governance, which includes extended periods of silence.

I’ll leave it for political scientists and activists to analyse the substance of the President’s Bastille Day speech. My concern here is why he waited this long.

If a week is a long time in politics, 10 days is close to an eon in today’s information society driven by 24/7 broadcast news and social media. An issue can evolve fast, and a person can get judged and written off in half that time.

For sure, there is a time to keep silence, and a time to speak – and the President must have had some good reasons keep mum. But in this instance, he paid a heavy price for it: he was questioned, ridiculed and maligned by many of us who had heartily cheered him only six months ago. (Full disclosure: I joined this chorus, creating several easy-to-share ‘memes’ and introducing an unkind twitter hashtag: #අයියෝසිරිසේන.)

President Maithripala Sirisena

President Maithripala Sirisena

Sri Lanka’s democratic recovery can’t afford too much of this uncertainty and distraction created by strategic presidential silences. Zen-like long pauses don’t sit well with impatient citizen expectations.

And the President himself must reconsider this strategy (if it is indeed one) — his political opponents are hyperactive in both mainstream and social media, spinning an endless array of stories that discredit him.

Until a generation ago, we used to say that a lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes. In today’s networked society, when information travels at the speed of light, fabrications and half-truths spread faster than ever.

Public trust in leaders and institutions is also being redefined. Transparent governance needs political leaders to keep talking with their citizens, ideally in ways that enrich public conversations.

President Sirisena is not the only Lankan leader who needs to catch up with this new communications reality. When a controversy erupted over how the Central Bank of Sri Lanka handled Treasury Bond issue on February 27, the government took more than two weeks to respond properly.

On March 17, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe made a detailed statement in Parliament, which he opened with the words: “I felt my first statement with regard to the so-called controversy over Treasury bonds should be made to this House…”

In a strict legalistic or technocratic sense, Wickremesinghe was probably right (as he usually is). But in the meantime, too many speculations had circulated, some questioning the new administration’s commitment to transparency and accountability. Political detractors had had a field day.

Could it have been handled differently? Should the government spokespersons have turned more defensive or even combative?

More generically, is maintaining a stoic silence until full clarity emerges realistic when governments no longer have a monopoly over information dissemination? Is it ever wise, in today’s context, to stay quiet hoping things would eventually blow away? How does this lack of engagement affect public trust in governments and governance?

These are serious questions that modern day politicians and elected officials must address. In my view, we need a President and Prime Minister who are engaged with citizens — so that we are not left guessing wildly or speculating endlessly on what is going on.

No, this is not a call for political propaganda, which has also been sidelined by the increasingly vocal social media voices and debates.

What we need is what I outlined in an open letter to President Sirisena in January: “As head of state, we expect you to strive for accuracy, balance and credibility in all communications. The last government relied so heavily on spin doctors and costly lobbyists both at home and abroad. Instead, we want you to be honest with us and the outside world. Please don’t airbrush the truth.”

 

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene has been chronicling and analysing the rise of new media in Sri Lanka since the early 1990s. He is active on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com