Sri Lanka Parliamentary Election 2015: How did Social Media make a difference?

A Popular Election Meme created by Hashtag Generation, Sri Lanka

A Popular Election Meme created by Hashtag Generation, Sri Lanka

“Every citizen – including activists and academics — can play a part in shaping the future of our democracy. In this, technology is not the only key driver; what matters even more is the strategic use of our imagination and determination.

“We may not yet have all the detailed answers of our digital future, but one thing is clear. In 2015, we the people of Sri Lanka embarked on a progressive digitalization of our politics and governance.

“It is going to be a bumpy road – be forewarned — but there is no turning back.”

These are the closing paras of a long format essay I have just written on the role of social media in the recently concluded Sri Lanka Parliamentary (General) Election on 17 August 2015.  It has been published by Groundviews.org citizen journalism website.

I Will Vote meme created by Groundviews.org - trilingual version

I Will Vote meme created by Groundviews.org – trilingual version

Shortly after the Presidential Election of 8 January 2015 ended, I called it Sri Lanka’s first cyber election. That was based on my insights from over 20 years of watching and chronicling the gradual spread of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Sri Lanka and the resulting rise of an information society.

Since then, things have evolved further. In this essay, I look at how the Elections Commission, political parties, election candidates, civil society advocacy groups and individual cyber activists have used various social media tools and platforms in the run-up to, during and immediately after the Parliamentary Election.

Read full text at:

Groundviews.org 3 September 2015: Sri Lanka Parliamentary Election 2015: How did Social Media make a difference

A compact version appeared in Daily Mirror, 3 September 2015: Social Media and LK General Election 2015: Has E-democracy arrived in Sri Lanka?

Not voting - then you have no right to complain afterwards! Voter message from March 12 Movement for Clean Politicians, Sri Lanka

Not voting – then you have no right to complain afterwards! Voter message from March 12 Movement for Clean Politicians, Sri Lanka

Social Media and LK General Election 2015: Has E-democracy arrived in Sri Lanka?

From Sri Lanka Elections Department Facebook page

From Sri Lanka Elections Department Facebook page

“What role (if any) did social media play in the recently concluded General Election on 17 August 2015?

“Many are asking this question – and coming up with different answers. That is characteristic of the cyber realm: there is no single right answer when it comes to a multi-faceted and fast-evolving phenomenon like social media.

“Shortly after the Presidential Election of 8 January 2015 ended, I called it Sri Lanka’s first cyber election. That was based on my insights from over 20 years of watching and chronicling the gradual spread of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Sri Lanka and the resulting rise of an information society.

“That was not the first time social media had figured in Lankan election campaigns. The trend started slowly some years ago, with a few tech-aware politicians and advertising agencies using websites, Facebook pages and twitter accounts for political outreach. However, such uses did not reach a ‘critical mass’ in the general and presidential elections held in 2010, or in the provincial and local government elections held thereafter.

“By late 2014, that changed significantly but this time the frontrunners were politically charged and digitally empowered citizens, not politicians or their support teams.”

The above is an extract from an op-ed I have just written and published in Daily Mirror broadsheet national newspaper in Sri Lanka (3 Sep 2015).

Full text is found online here:

Special thanks to Sanjana Hattotuwa and Yudhanjaya Wijeratne from whose analyses I have drawn. The unattributed opinions are all mine.

Infographic by Daily Mirror Sri Lanka

Infographic by Daily Mirror Sri Lanka

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #229: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යුගයේ අපේ දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනය

In this week’s Ravaya column, (in Sinhala, appearing in issue of 26 July 2015), I review how Lankan politicians and political parties are using social media in the run-up to the general election to be held on 17 August 2015.

In particular, I look at how President Maithripala Sirisena and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe are using Facebook and Twitter (mostly to ‘broadcast’ their news and images, and hardly ever to engage citizens). I also remark on two other politicians who have shown initiative in social media use, i.e. former President Mahinda Rajapaksa and JHU leader Champika Ranawaka (both of who have held live Q&As on social media with varying degrees of engagement).

I raise questions like these: Can political parties afford to not engage 25% of Lankan population now regularly using the web? When would election campaigners – rooted in the legacy media’s practice of controlling and fine-tuning messages – come to terms with the unpredictable and sometimes unruly nature of social media?

While politicians, their campaigners and parties struggle to find their niches on social media, politically conscious citizens need to up their game too. Cyber literacy has been slower to spread than mere internet connectivity in Sri Lanka, and we need enlightened and innovative use of social media in the public interest. Every citizen, activist and advocacy group can play a part.

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

Can social media communications influence voting patterns?

ජනගහනයෙන් හතරෙන් එකක් පමණ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන මට්ටමට එළැඹ සිටින අපේ රටේ මෙම සයිබර් සාධකය මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රචාරණයට හා ඡන්දදායක මතයට කෙසේ බලපානවාද යන්න විමසීම වැදගත්.

2010 මහ මැතිවරණයේ භාවිත වූවාට වඩා බෙහෙවින් මෙවර මැතිවරණයේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය සිදුවන බව නම් කල් තබාම කිව හැකියි.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂ, ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්, සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධාන හා සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියන් යන මේ පිරිස් සතරම වෙබ් අඩවි හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වෙත යොමු වීමත් සමග දේශපාලන තොරතුරු හා මතවාද ගලා යෑම පෙර පැවතියාට වඩා වෙනස්වන්නේ කෙලෙසද?

විශේෂයෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත හා පක්ෂවලින් ප‍්‍රශ්න කරන්නට හා ඔවුන් අභියෝගයට ලක් කරන්නට හැකි වීම හරහා දේශපාලන සංවාද වඩා හරවත් විය හැකිද? මෙය කෙතරම් පුළුල්ව රටේ සමාජගත වනවාද?

Twitter and Facebook - leading social media platforms

Twitter and Facebook – leading social media platforms

ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ ජනප‍්‍රියතම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලය ෆේස්බුක් (Facebook). එහි මෙරට ගිණුම් මිලියන් 2.5කට වඩා තිබෙනවා. ව්‍යාජ ගිණුම් හෝ ද්විත්ව ගිණුම් පසෙක තැබුවහොත් අඩු තරමින් මිලියන් 2ක් ලාංකිකයන් ෆේස්බුක් සැරිසරනවා යැයි කිව හැකියි. මෙරට ජනප‍්‍රිය අනෙක් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවන්නේ ට්විටර් (Twitter), වීඩියෝ බෙදා ගන්නා යූටියුබ් (YouTube) හා ඡායාරූප හුවමාරු කැරෙන ඉන්ස්ටග‍්‍රෑම් (Instagram).

මේ හැම සයිබර් වේදිකාවකම මේ දිනවල දේශපාලනයට අදාළ තොරතුරු, මතවාද හා රූප බෙහෙවින් සංසරණය වනවා.

දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට හා ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන්ට මේ යථාර්ථය නොසලකා සිටීමට බැහැ. එහෙත් බොහෝ පක්ෂවල මැතිවරණ කැම්පේන් හසුරුවන්නේ සාම්ප‍්‍රදායික මාධ්‍ය ගැන දන්නා, එහෙත් නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන හරි අවබෝධයක් නැති හිටපු මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හෝ දැන්වීම් ඒජන්සි විසින්.

පත්තරවල මුදල් ගෙවා ඉඩ මිලට ගැනීමට හා රේඩියෝ-ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවල ගුවන් කාලය මිලට ගැනීමට මේ උදවිය හොඳහැටි දන්නවා. මුදලට වඩා කාලය, ශ‍්‍රමය හා නිර්මාණශීලී බව අවශ්‍ය වන සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට නිසි ලෙස ප‍්‍රවේශ වන හැටි මේ අයට වැටහීමක් නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලටත් මුදල් ගෙවා ඕනැම කෙනකුට තම ප‍්‍රචාරය උත්සන්න කර ගත හැකියි. ෆේස්බුක් ගෝලීය වේදිකාවක් වුවත්, තම භාණ්ඩය හෝ සේවාව හෝ පණිවුඩය නිශ්චිත රටක, නිශ්චිත වයස් කාණ්ඩයකට ඉලක්ක කොට පෙන්වීම කර ගත හැකියි.

එසේම ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් සඳහා තොග වශයෙන් ලෝලීන් (fans) හා මනාප (likes) විකුණන විදේශීය සමාගම් තිබෙනවා. අපේ සමහර දේශපාලන චරිත අරඹා ඇති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම්වලට ඔවුන් හීන්සීරුවේ මුදල් ගෙවා මෙසේ තොග පිටින් ලෝලීන් හා මනාප ලබා ගෙන ඇති බව හෙළිව තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලකයන්ට ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ සිටින Fans ගණනටත් වඩා තුර්කියේ සිටින සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩිවීමට හේතුව එයයි.

20 March 2015: Social Media Analysis: Sri Lankan Politicians and Social Media

මුදල් ගෙවා ලබා ගන්නා සමාජ මාධ් රමුඛත්වය විශ්වසනීය හෝ සාර්ථක වන්නේ නැහැ. මෙය කුලියට ගත් බස් රථවලින් මුදල් ගෙවා සෙනග රැළිවලට ගෙනෙනවාට සමානයිග සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාව පුළුල් වන විට මෙබඳු උපක‍්‍රම ගැන වැඩි දෙනකු දැන ගන්නවා.

social-media

කෙටි කාලීනවත් දිගු කාලීනවත් වඩාත් සාර්ථක ප‍්‍රවේශය නම් නිරතුරු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසියන් සමග සාමීචියේ හා සංවාදයේ යෙදී සිටීමයි (මැතිවරණයක් එළැඹි විට පමණක් නොවෙයි).

දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා කැම්පේන්කරුවන් කියන දෙය ඡන්දදායක මහජනතාව වැඳ ගෙන ඔහේ අසා සිටි කාලය ඉවරයි. දැන් මතුව එන්නේ අප කාටත් සංවාද විසංවාද හා තර්ක කළ හැකි නව සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථයක්.

සමාජ ජාල මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන සියලූ ලාංකික දේශපාලකයන් හෝ දේශපාලන පක්ෂ හෝ නිතිපතා ෆලෝ කරන්නට මට හැකි වී නැහැ. එය ලේසි පාසු කාරියක්ද නොවෙයි.

එහෙත් ජනාධිපති මෛත‍්‍රීපාල සිරිසේනගේ නිල ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ද, අගමැති රනිල් වික‍්‍රමසිංහගේ ට්විටර් ගිණුමද හරහා කුමක් සන්නිවේදනය වේද යන්න ගැන මා විමසිලිමත්ව සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

President Sirisena’s verified Facebook page, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.00 Sri Lanka Time

කාර්යබහුල මෙවන් නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් පවත්වාගෙන යන්නේ ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් විසින්. එය ලොව පුරා සම්ප‍්‍රදායක්. බොහෝ විට මේ ගිණුම් හරහා නායකයා කරන කියන දේ ගැන සංක්ෂිප්ත තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප/කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හැරෙනවා.

මේ අන්තර්ගතයම නිල වෙබ්අඩවි හා මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රකාශන හරහා ද නිකුත් කැරෙන නමුත් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය පවා අද කාලේ නායකයන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් හරහා කියැවෙන දේ ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටිනවා. අවශ්‍ය විටදී යම් දේ එතැනින් උපුටා දක්වනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගත වන දේශපාලන නායකයන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ මාධ්‍ය කණ්ඩායම් මුහුණ දෙන අභියෝග ගණනාවක් තිබෙනවා. මූලික එකක් නම් තමන්ගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් විශ්වාසදායක නිල ගිනුම් (verified accounts) බව තහවුරු කර ගැනීමයි.

ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙබ් අඩවි ලිපිනයන් (URLs) මෙන්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් නාමයන් ද මුලින්ම එය ලියාපදිංචි කරන්නාට හිමි කර ගත හැකියි. රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරිවාදය නැති සයිබර් අවකාශයේ අපූර්වත්වය එය වුවත් එය අවභාවිතයට යොදන අයද සිටිනවා.

President Sirisena's verified Twitter account - screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

President Sirisena’s verified Twitter account – screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.45 Sri Lanka time

 

මෙරට ජනාධිපති හා අගමැති දෙදෙනාගේම නම් පදනම් කර ගෙන ඇරඹූ ව්යාජ ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ඕනෑකමින් අධ්යයනය කළ විට මේවා ව්යාජ බව පෙනී යතත්, බැලූ බැල්මට ජනයා මුලා කිරීමේ හැකියාව තිබෙනවා. මේ නිසා රසිද්ධ පුද්ගලයන් (දේශපාලන නායකයන්, සිනමා තරු, රීඩකයන් ආදීන්) අනන්යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ් ගිණුම් සකසා ගැනීමත්, එය පැහැදිලිව පෙන්නුම් කිරීමත් වැදගත්.

පසුගිය ජනාධිපතිවරණයේදී කැම්පේන් වැඩට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යම් පමණකට ඔවුන් යොදා ගත්තද ජනාධිපති සිරිසේන හා අගමැති වික‍්‍රමසිංහ දෙපළටම අනන්‍යතාව තහවුරු කළ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් තිබුණේ නැහැ. මේවායේ අවශ්‍යතාව අප සමහරක් දෙනා ප‍්‍රසිද්ධ අවකාශයේ පෙන්වා නිතර දුන්නා.

මේ අනුව 2015 මැයි මාසයේ පටන් ජනාධිපති සිරිසේනට තහවුරු කරන ලද නිල ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් තිබෙනවා. ප‍්‍රමාද වී හෝ මෙය ලබා ගැනීම හිතකර ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. එහෙත් වික‍්‍රමසිංහ නමින් ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ගණනාවක් පවතින අතර එයින් කුමක් ඔහුගේ නිල ගිණුම් ද යන්න තහවුරු කර නැහැ. අපට කළ හැක්කේ අනුමාන පමණයි.

මේ දෙදෙනාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය ද ප‍්‍රශස්ත මට්ටමක නැහැ. ගිය වසර අගදී කැම්පේන් කරන විටත්, ජනාධිපති ලෙස තේරී පත් වූ පසුවත් මෛත‍්‍රිපාල සිරිසේන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන්නේ තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප බෙදාහරින්නට මිස පුරවැසියන් සමග සංවාදයට නොවෙයි.

ජනපතිවරණයට පෙර හා පසු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පිළිතුරු දෙන සජීව සැසි වාරයක් (Live Q&A) කරන මෙන් අප ඉල්ලා සිටියා. මේ වනතුරු එබන්දක් සිදුකර නැහැ. තම ජයග්‍රහනයට උපකාර වූවා යයි ඔහුම ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පැසසූ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පුරවැසි ප්‍රශ්නවලට මුහුණ දීමට ජනපති සිරිසේන පැකිලෙන්නේ ඇයි?

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account - IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

Ranil Wickremesinghe Twitter account – IS THIS OFFICIAL? screen shot taken on 26 July 2015 at 13.55 Sri Lanka time.jpg

වික‍්‍රමසිංහ අගමැතිවරයාගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය වඩාත් පසුගාමීයි. ඔහුගේ ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුමෙන් මේ දිනවල ප‍්‍රචාරක රැලිවල ඡායාරූප හා කෙටි කෙටි වීඩියෝ බෙදා හරිනවා. එහෙත් රටේ ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන හෝ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති/විසඳුම් ගැන කිසිදු සංවාදයක් පෙනෙන්නට නැහැ.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය හරහා දේශපාලන චරිත ප‍්‍රචාරණයට එහා යන තවත් බොහෝ දේ කළ හැකියි. මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රකාශයන්ට අදහස් හා යෝජනා ඉල්ලා ලබා ගත හැකියි. රටේ දැවෙන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන (සීරුවෙන් හා ප‍්‍රවේශමෙන්) සංවාද කොට මහජන මතය ගැන දළ හැඟීමක් ලද හැකියි. ඡන්දදායකයන්ගේ රුචි අරුචිකම්, ප‍්‍රමුඛතා හා අපේක්ෂා ගැන ගවේෂණය කළ හැකියි.

ඉන්දියාව, ඉන්දුනීසියාව, තායිලන්තය හා පිලිපීනය වැනි ආසියානු රටවල දේශපාලකයන් හා පක්ෂ මෙසේ වඩාත් හරවත් හා පුළුල් ලෙසින් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගන්නවා.

මැතිවරණ ආසන්න වන විට මිලියන් ගණන් වැය කරමින් ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ පැවැත්වීම දැන් අපේ ප‍්‍රධාන දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලත් සිරිතක්. බොහෝ විට සොයා ගැනීම් ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියට පත් නොකරන මේ සමීක්ෂණවලින් කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ හා අවධාරණය කළ යුතු තැන් ආදිය ගැන යම් ඉඟි ලැබෙන බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් සමීක්ෂකයන් අසන හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයකටම ජනයා අවකංව පිළිතුරු නොදෙන නිසා මේ සමීක්ෂණවල ආවේණික සීමා තිබෙනවා.

එයට වඩා විවෘත ලෙස මත දැක්වීමක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ කැරෙනවා. මේවා විශ්ලේෂණය කරන මෘදුකාංග හරහා යම් සමුච්චිත ප‍්‍රවණතා සොයා ගත හැකියි. එබඳු විශ්ලේෂණ දැන් වෙනත් රටවල දේශපාලන පක්ෂ සන්නිවේදකයෝ කරනවා. ඒ හරහා කැම්පේන් පණිවුඩ වඩාත් සමාජගත කර ගත හැකියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල විභවය තේරුම් ගෙන ඇතැයි පෙනෙන ජාතික මට්ටමේ දේශපාලන චරිත දෙකක් නම් මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ හා චම්පික රණවකයි. ඔවුන්ගේ දේශපාලන මතවාදයන් කුමක් වෙතත්, මෙරට සෙසු දේශපාලකයන්ට සාපේක්ෂව ඔවුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා යම් පුරවැසි පිරිසක් සමග සන්නිවේදනය කරනවා. නිතිපතා නොවූවත් විටින් විට හෝ පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා පිළිතුරු ද දෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa verified Twitter account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.05 Sri Lanka Time

ගිය වසරේ මේ දෙපළ පැවැත් වූ ට්විටර් ප‍්‍රශ්නෝත්තර සැසිවලදී දුෂ්කර යැයි සැලකිය හැකි අන්දමේ ප‍්‍රශ්න මා ඉදිරිපත් කළා. රාජපක්ෂ එවන් ප‍්‍රශ්න නොතකා හැර ලෙහෙසි යයි පෙනෙන ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පමණක් පිළිතුරු දුන්නා. එහෙත් රණවක ආන්දෝලනාත්මක මාතෘකා ගැන පවා තම මතයේ සිට පිළිතුරු සැපයූවා. එම පිළිතුරු ගැන මා සෑහීමකට පත් නොවූවත් ඔහු එසේ සංවාදයේ නියැලීම මා අගය කරනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල බොරු පුරාජේරු පම්පෝරි කරන්න අමාරුයි. එය භාවිත කරන සමහර පුරවැසියන් ගරුසරු නොවීමට හා සත්‍යවාදී නොවීමට ද ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. සමහර දේශපාලන කැම්පේන්කරුවන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සංවාදවලට ඉඩ නොදෙන්නේ මේ අවදානම නිසා විය හැකියි.

දේශපාලන රැස්වීම් වේදිකාවක කථිකයකුට ඉඳහිට හූ හඬක් ලැබිය හැකි වුවත් ඉන් ඔබ්බට යන අභියෝග මතු වන්නේ නැහැ. ටෙලිවිෂන් දේශපාලන සංවාදවලත් මෙහෙයවන්නා විසින් යම් සමනයක් පවත්වා ගන්නවා. මෙබඳු තිරිංග නැති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා දුෂ්කර ප‍්‍රශ්න, අවලාද, බොරු චෝදනා හා අපහාස එල්ල විය හැකියි.

එහෙත් පොදු අවකාශයේ සිටින, මහජන නියෝජිතයන් වීමට වරම් පතන දේශපාලකයන් මෙබඳු මහජන රතිචාරවලට මුහුණ දීමේ හැකියාව හා පරිණත බව සමාජ මාධ් හරහා රටටම පෙනෙනවා.

Mahinda Rajapaksa's verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

Mahinda Rajapaksa’s verified Facebook account, screen shot on 26 July 2015 at 14.02 Sri Lanka Time

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පරිහරණය කරන පුරවැසි අපටත් වගකීම් තිබෙනවා. අප කැමති දේශපාලන පක්ෂයට හා චරිතවලට සයිබර් සහයෝගය දෙන අතරේ යම් සංයමයක් පවත්වා ගත යුතුයි. ප‍්‍රතිවිරුද්ධ මතධාරීන්ට අසැබි ලෙසින් පහර නොගසා තර්කයට තර්කය මතු කළ යුතුයි. එසේම නොකඩවා ගලා එන විවිධ විග‍්‍රහයන් හා රූප වැඩිදුර පතුරුවන්නට පෙර ඒවා වෛරීය දේශපාලනයට අදාළදැයි මඳක් සිතිය යුතුයි.

මෙරට ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන්නන්ගෙන් 80%කට වඩා එහි රවේශ වන්නේ ස්මාට් ෆෝන් හරහායි. ස්මාට්ෆෝන් තිබුනාට මදි. ස්මාට් පුරවැසියන් වීමටත් ඕනෑ! වැඩවසම් ගතානුගතිකත්වය හා වෛරීය ජාතිකත්වය පසු කර නව දේශපාල සදාචාරයක් බිහි කරන්නට අප දායක විය යුතුයි!

See also other related columns of mine:

16 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #160: දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයෙ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාධකය

23 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #161: සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ඇයි මේ තරම් බය?

21 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #199: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය, මැතිවරණ හා ඩිජිටල් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය

28 Dec 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #200: ඩිජිටල් තාක්‍ෂණයෙන් මැතිවරණ ක‍්‍රියාදාමය පිරිසුදු කළ ඉන්දුනීසියාව

4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

 

 

Posted in Broadcasting, Campaigns, digital media, good governance, ICT, India, Indonesia, Internet, Media, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, social media, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Television, YouTube. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Op-ed Essay: The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

This op-ed essay of mine was published in Daily FT newspaper, Sri Lanka, on 16 July 2015.

The Price of Silence in Social Media Age

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Just when we began to worry that our recently elected head of state had lost his tongue, he broke his silence.

On July 14 evening, President Maithripala Sirisena finally addressed the nation. He spoke calmly and clearly. He was resolute — but with none of the pomp and bravado that characterised his predecessor Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Speech of the President Maithripala Sirisena – 14 July 2015 (in Sinhala)

Sirisena’s speech outlined his key actions and accomplishments since being elected less than 200 days ago in one of the biggest election surprises in Lankan political history. He was mildly defensive of his low-key style of governance, which includes extended periods of silence.

I’ll leave it for political scientists and activists to analyse the substance of the President’s Bastille Day speech. My concern here is why he waited this long.

If a week is a long time in politics, 10 days is close to an eon in today’s information society driven by 24/7 broadcast news and social media. An issue can evolve fast, and a person can get judged and written off in half that time.

For sure, there is a time to keep silence, and a time to speak – and the President must have had some good reasons keep mum. But in this instance, he paid a heavy price for it: he was questioned, ridiculed and maligned by many of us who had heartily cheered him only six months ago. (Full disclosure: I joined this chorus, creating several easy-to-share ‘memes’ and introducing an unkind twitter hashtag: #අයියෝසිරිසේන.)

President Maithripala Sirisena

President Maithripala Sirisena

Sri Lanka’s democratic recovery can’t afford too much of this uncertainty and distraction created by strategic presidential silences. Zen-like long pauses don’t sit well with impatient citizen expectations.

And the President himself must reconsider this strategy (if it is indeed one) — his political opponents are hyperactive in both mainstream and social media, spinning an endless array of stories that discredit him.

Until a generation ago, we used to say that a lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes. In today’s networked society, when information travels at the speed of light, fabrications and half-truths spread faster than ever.

Public trust in leaders and institutions is also being redefined. Transparent governance needs political leaders to keep talking with their citizens, ideally in ways that enrich public conversations.

President Sirisena is not the only Lankan leader who needs to catch up with this new communications reality. When a controversy erupted over how the Central Bank of Sri Lanka handled Treasury Bond issue on February 27, the government took more than two weeks to respond properly.

On March 17, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe made a detailed statement in Parliament, which he opened with the words: “I felt my first statement with regard to the so-called controversy over Treasury bonds should be made to this House…”

In a strict legalistic or technocratic sense, Wickremesinghe was probably right (as he usually is). But in the meantime, too many speculations had circulated, some questioning the new administration’s commitment to transparency and accountability. Political detractors had had a field day.

Could it have been handled differently? Should the government spokespersons have turned more defensive or even combative?

More generically, is maintaining a stoic silence until full clarity emerges realistic when governments no longer have a monopoly over information dissemination? Is it ever wise, in today’s context, to stay quiet hoping things would eventually blow away? How does this lack of engagement affect public trust in governments and governance?

These are serious questions that modern day politicians and elected officials must address. In my view, we need a President and Prime Minister who are engaged with citizens — so that we are not left guessing wildly or speculating endlessly on what is going on.

No, this is not a call for political propaganda, which has also been sidelined by the increasingly vocal social media voices and debates.

What we need is what I outlined in an open letter to President Sirisena in January: “As head of state, we expect you to strive for accuracy, balance and credibility in all communications. The last government relied so heavily on spin doctors and costly lobbyists both at home and abroad. Instead, we want you to be honest with us and the outside world. Please don’t airbrush the truth.”

 

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene has been chronicling and analysing the rise of new media in Sri Lanka since the early 1990s. He is active on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com

BBC Sinhala interview: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල වල ක්‍රියාකාරීත්වය 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණ ප්‍රතිඵලයට කොපමණ බලපෑමක් කළේද?

On 13 Feb 2015, while briefly in London, I visited BBC’s new Media Centre and recorded brief interviews with BBC Sinhala and BBC Tamil services (radio) on the role of social media during the Sri Lanka Presidential Election 2015 – the topic of my talk at University of London the previous day.

BBC Sinhala published the story online on 22 Feb 2015, along with an edited down audio track.

Here is the accompanying text. Listen to audio interview on BBC Sinhala website.

Nalaka Gunawardene in BBC World Service studio, 13 Feb 2015

Nalaka Gunawardene in BBC World Service studio, 13 Feb 2015 – Photo by Saroj Pathirana

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඔස්සේ ‘නැති බැරි අයට වැඩි අනුකම්පාවක්’

22 පෙබරවාරි 2015 අවසාන වරට යාවත්කාලීන කළේ 11:33 GMT

පසුගිය ජනාධිපතිවරණයේදී ‘ඇති හැකි’ අපේක්ෂකයන්ට වඩා ‘නැති බැරි’ අපේක්ෂකයන්ට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල ඔස්සේ වැඩි ‘අනුකම්පාවක්’ ලැබුණු හැඩක් පෙනී ගිය බව සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල ක්‍රියාධරයෝ පවසති.

එබැවින් සම්පත් විශාල වශයෙන් යොදා ගනිමින් පුළුල් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල ක්‍රියාකාරිත්වයක නිරත වූ හිටපු ජනාධිපති මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂට වඩා සීමිත සම්පත් යොදා ගෙන සිය පණිවුඩය ඉදිරිපත් කළ මෛත්‍රීපාල සිරිසේන විපක්ෂයේ පොදු අපේක්ෂකයාට වැඩි අවධානයක් යොමු වූ ආකාරයක් දක්නට ලැබුණු බව විද්‍යා ලේඛක සහ තීරු ලිපි රචක නාලක ගුණවර්ධන බීබීසී සංදේශයට කියා සිටියේය.

කෙසේ නමුත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල වල ක්‍රියාකාරීත්වය ජනාධිපතිවරණ ප්‍රතිඵලයට කොපමණ බලපෑමක් කළේද යන්න සම්බන්ධයෙන් පුළුල් සමීක්ෂණයක් අවශ්‍ය බව ඔහු සඳහන් කරයි.

ලන්ඩන් විශ්ව විද්‍යාලයේ සහ පොදු රාජ්‍ය මණ්ඩලීය මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ගේ සංවිධානයේ මෙහෙයවීමෙන් ජනපතිවරණයේදී ශ්‍රී ලංකා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලවල බලපෑම සම්බන්ධයෙන් දේශනයක් පැවැත්වීම පිණිස ලන්ඩනයට පැමිණ සිටි නාලක ගුණවර්ධන එම අදහස් පල කළේ බීබීසී මැදිරියේදී සංදේශයේ සරෝජ් පතිරණ සමඟ සාකච්ඡාවකට එක්වෙමින්.

‘නිදහස් අදහස්’

විශේෂයෙන්ම නිදහස් අදහස් ප්‍රකාශනයට ප්‍රබල බාධක පැවතුණු වාතාවරණයක සිය අදහස් සහ යෝජනා ඉදිරිපත් කිරීමට සහ සිය විවේචන එලි දැක්වීමටත් සමාජ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයන් මෙන්ම විපක්ෂයද සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල යොදා ගත් බවත් නාලක ගුණවර්ධන පෙන්වා දෙයි.

“අනෙක් කාරණය තමයි කිසිම දේශපාලන පක්ෂයකට අයත් නොවූ නමුත් දේශපාලනය ගැන උනන්දුවක් තියෙන තරුණ පිරිස් මේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල යොදා ගත්තා ඔවුනොවුන් අතර කතාබහ කරන්න මේ සමාජ ක්‍රමය, සංස්කෘතිය කෙසේ නම් වෙනස් වෙන්න ඕනෙද? ඔවුන් සෘජුව අමතන්න පටන් ගත්තා ප්‍රධාන අපේක්ෂකයන් දෙදෙනා,” ඔහු පැවසීය.

ෆේස්බුක් හෙවත් මුහුණු පොත ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ තරුණ පරපුර අතර වඩාත්ම ජනප්‍රිය සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලය බවට පත්වෙද්දී, ජනපතිවරණය සමයේ ට්විටර් ජාලය ඔස්සේද පුළුල් ක්‍රියාකාරිත්වයක් දක්නට ලැබුණි.

ජනපතිවරණය සමයේ විශේෂයෙන්ම සිංහල බ්ලොග් අඩවිවල ක්‍රියාකාරීත්වයද කැපී පෙනුණි.

කෙසේ නමුත් සිය නිවේදන සහ පුවත් අඩවිවල යොමු (ලින්ක්) බෙදාහැරීම හැරුණු විට විශේෂයෙන්ම සිය ඡන්දදායකයන් සමඟ අදහස් හුවමාරුවකට, නොඑසේනම් සංවාදයකට, ජනපතිවරණ අපේක්ෂකයන් ට්විටර් වැනි සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල යොදා නොගත් බව නාලක ගුණවර්ධන පෙන්වා දෙයි.

“මේක දැක්මේ තියන සීමාවක්,” ඔහු පැවසීය.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල ක්‍රියාකාරිත්වය සිය ජයග්‍රහණයට ප්‍රබල දායකත්වයක් සැපයූ බව ජනාධිපති මෛත්‍රීපාල සිරිසේන විසින් ද පිළිගෙන තිබුණි.

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) with his BBC interviewer Saroj Pathirana

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) with his BBC interviewer Saroj Pathirana – Photo by Prasanna Ratnayake

 

 

 

 

Emerging Digital Democracy? Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015

Nalaka Gunawardene talking at London University on 12 Feb 2015 on "Social Media and Sri Lanka's Presidential Election 2015"

Nalaka Gunawardene talking at London University on 12 Feb 2015 on “Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015” Photo by  Prasanna Ratnayake

Emerging Digital Democracy? Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015

This was the topic of a public talk I gave at the University of London on 12 Feb 2015.

It was organised and hosted by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London in collaboration with the Commonwealth Journalists’ Association (CJA).

They lined up the University’s Senate Room for the talk, which was attended by a South Asian audience who engaged me in a lively discussion.

Emerging Digital Democracy? Social Media and Sri Lanka's Presidential Election 2015

Emerging Digital Democracy?
Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015

Synopsis of the talk:

A record 81.5% of registered voters took part in Sri Lanka’s presidential election on 8 January 2015 in which incumbent Mahinda Rajapaksa was defeated by his former health minister Maithripala Sirisena. The peaceful regime change has been widely acclaimed as a triumph of democracy and a mandate for political reform, improved governance and national reconciliation.

The election saw unprecedented use of social media by both candidates as well as by politically charged yet unaffiliated youth. How much of this citizen awakening can be attributed to the fast spread of smartphones and broadband? Did it really influence how people voted? What does this mean for future politics and governance in Sri Lanka?

In this illustrated talk, science journalist and new media watcher (and practitioner) Nalaka Gunawardene shares his insights and views.

Who's afraid of social media? Many Lankan politicians, for sure...

Who’s afraid of social media? Many Lankan politicians, for sure…

My PowerPoint slides:

 

Key questions that need more research to answer:

This is why we need better research on new media and society in Sri Lanka!

This is why we need better research on new media and society in Sri Lanka!

Photos by Prasanna Ratnayake

William Crawley (right), Fellow of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, introduces Nalaka Gunawardene

William Crawley (right), Fellow of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, introduces Nalaka Gunawardene

Nalaka Gunawardene on Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015 at University of London, 12 Feb 2015

Nalaka Gunawardene on Social Media and Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election 2015 at University of London, 12 Feb 2015

A section of the audience at Senate Room, University of London, listening to Nalaka Gunawardene: 12 Feb 2015

A section of the audience at Senate Room, University of London, listening to Nalaka Gunawardene: 12 Feb 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sri Lanka Presidential Election 2010: Choices made, now we move on…

Heads you lose, tails we win...?

With over 10 million others, I voted in Sri Lanka’s sixth Presidential Election yesterday. Today, after the votes were counted and tallied, we were informed that the incumbent President Mahinda Rajapaksa has been re-elected for another six year term. He has won 57.9% of the valid votes.

Nearly 11,000 polling stations had been set up for this purpose, mostly at temples or schools. A quarter of a million public servants were mobilised to handle this massive operation, while close to 100,000 policemen and soldiers were tasked to maintain law and order. And the whole business of choosing the next leader is costing the war-impoverished nation several billion rupees.

So do the results — basically, more of the same — justify all this cost and effort? Was there real choice for us the hopeful little men (and women) who walked into little booths with little pencils in hand to make a little cross on a (not so) little bit of paper?

Opinion is highly polarised on that last question. The two main candidates not only tried to outpromise each other without coherence or focus, but also made a mockery out of the whole campaign process.

In fact, as I noted in my essay last week titled Open Moment, Closed Minds: “Party politics has always polarised Lankans, but no other election in recent memory has been as divisive…The two main contenders both claim to hold a mutually exclusive key to a better future for our land and people. Their dizzy campaigns bombard us with lofty claims and counter-claims 24/7 delivered through broadcast, broadband, mobile and other media.”

With pre-election violence escalating, the choice before voters looked like this a week before election day.

The election results will be analysed and debated for weeks to come. At first glance, it looks as if the voters used this election to express gratitude to Rajapaksa for having provided the political leadership to end Sri Lanka’s long-drawn civil war.

We can argue whether presidential elections should be turned into referendums on individual performance of candidates – or instead, decided on the vision and policies offered by them. I grant this is a bit more serious than American Idol – or its local variations – where we text our preference for the candidate with the best looks or talent.

In fact, I’m still not convinced whether it’s such a good idea to mix personal gratitude with voting for a head of state.

I’ve voted in four presidential and three general elections (I missed some due to overseas travel). With one exception (1994), all have been ‘protest votes’ – I was voting against an incumbent more than in favour of an aspirant.

But there are more things in heaven and on Earth, dear reader, than are dreamt in our messy politics. Albert Einstein said it so well many decades ago: “Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted.”

We can only hope that our votes were properly counted — and that they count and matter to the leader whom we have collectively chosen today. That is, if he can see and hear beyond the cacophony of sycophants who surround him 24/7.

And as I tweeted earlier today: As Sri Lanka re-elects the President, we hope ALL 20 million Lankans can share the promise of a Better Future on which he campaigned and won…

Cartoons courtesy: Daily Mirror, Sri Lanka