Kasturi’s Progress: 1933 – 2017

W D K (Kasturiratne) Gunawardene as a young man (left) and at 80

Kasturi was born in another century in what now feels like an entirely different country. It was called Ceylon, a British colony, and the year was 1933.

Kasturi’s was a very ordinary life, which was mostly dedicated to education. But it was punctuated at various points by key events of his country and people. Tracing his life thus offers us some glimpses of his nation’s turbulent times.

At age two, he survived malaria during the major epidemic of 1933-35 which killed as estimated 80,000 to 100,000 Lankans. (He lived to see malaria being eradicated from Sri Lanka by 2016.)

At nine, he saw the Japanese air raid of Colombo and suburbs (1942), and lived through the various rations, restrictions and disruptions of World War II.

At 15, as a schoolboy he walked to Colombo’s Torrington square to personally bear witness to Ceylon becoming independent (1948). The following day, he wrote the best essay in class in which he outlined high hopes and dreams for his now self-governing nation.

At 20, he entered the University of Ceylon and was among the first students to experience the newly established Peradeniya campus where he studied history and Sinhala language. From the scenic hills, he would see the political transformation of 1956, as well as the cultural revival heralded by Maname (landmark Sinhala drama) and Rekava (landmark Sinhala movie).

At 25, as a fresh graduate entering the world, he witnessed the 1958 ethnic riots that foreshadowed the Sinhala-Tamil ethnic conflict that consumed his nation for the next half century. Among much else, it evaporated young Kasturi’s dreams of an inter-racial marriage.

At 50, as a teacher and father, he saw the far worse anti-Tamil pogrom of 1983. For the next quarter century, he would watch in horror — and guilt — as his generation’s collective blunders consumed the next generation’s future.

At 76, as a senior citizen still active in social work and literacy circles, he saw Sri Lanka’s civil war being ended brutally (2009). He had the audacity to hope once more, even if only cautiously. And yet again, his and many others’ hopes were dashed as political opportunism and corruption soon trumped over true healing and nation building. The nation was polarised beyond recognition.

At 82, he voted for a common opposition candidate (January 2015) and for political parties (Aug 2015) who pledged good governance (yaha-palanaya). That was his last public gesture, after having voted at all national elections during his time, and having spent 25 years as a public servant. He played by all the rules, but was let down by the system.

At 84, as he coped with a corroding cancer, Kasturi watched in dismay the much-touted promise of yaha-palana being squandered and betrayed. On 13 September 2017, he departed as a deeply disappointed man who remained highly apologetic for many wrong-turns taken by his generation.

Kasturi isn’t a figment of my imagination. Neither is he a composite character. Until yesterday, Kasturi was all too real. He was my father, whom we returned to the Earth today at a simple funeral. – Nalaka Gunawardene

Note: An earlier, and longer version of this was published in May 2014, and can be accessed at: http://groundviews.org/2014/05/07/kasturis-progress/

 

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) and his father Kasturiratne Gunawardene on the latter’s 83rd birthday, on 5 February 2016

[op-ed] Disaster Management in Sri Lanka: Never say ‘Never Again’?

Text of my op-ed article published in Weekend Express newspaper on 2 June 2017

In Sri Lanka, never say  ‘never again’?

By Nalaka Gunawardene

 

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera

Never Again!

We as a nation collectively uttered these words as we raised our heads after the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004. That mega-disaster, which caught our government unawares and society unprepared, devastated many coastal areas, killing around 40,000 and displacing over a million people.

Even a 30 minute early warning could have saved many of those lost lives, by simply asking them to run inland, away from the waves. But there was no such warning.

Badly shaken by that experience, the then government reformed disaster related laws and institutions. Until then, dealing with disaster response was lumped under social services. The new system created a dedicated ministry for disaster management, with emphasis on disaster risk reduction (DRR).

Living amidst multiple hazards is unavoidable, but preparedness can vastly reduce impacts when disasters do occur. That is DRR in a nutshell.

But in immature democracies like ours, we must never say never again. Our political parties and politicians lack the will and commitment required to meet these long-term objectives. Our governance systems are not fully capable of keeping ourselves safe from Nature’s wrath.

Disaster resilience is not a technocratic quick fix but the composite outcome of a myriad actions. Good governance is the vital ‘lubricant’ that makes everything come together and work well. Without governance, we risk slipping back into business as usual, continuing our apathy, greed and short-termism.

This big picture level reality could well be why disaster response has been patchy and uncoordinated in both May 2016 and last week.

Fundamental issues

As the flood waters recede in affected parts of Sri Lanka, familiar questions are being asked again. Did the government’s disaster management machinery fail to warn the communities at risk? Or were the hazard warnings issued but poorly communicated? And once disaster occurred, could the relief response have been better handled? Are we making enough use of technological tools?

These are valid questions that deserve honest answers and wide ranging debate. But having been associated with disaster communication for a quarter century, I get a strong sense of déjà vu when I hear them.

Finger pointing won’t get us very far, even though public anger is justified where governmental lapses are evident. We need to move beyond the blame game to identify core issues and then address them.

In my view, two high level issues are climate resilience and improved governance.

DRR is easier said than done in the best of times, and in recent years human-made climate change has made it much harder. Global warming is disrupting familiar weather patterns and causing more frequent and intense weather. What used to be weather extremes occurring once in 25 or 50 years in the past now happens every few years.

Climate imperatives

The UN’s climate panel (IPCC) says that global average temperatures could rise by somewhere between 2 degree and 6 degrees Centigrade by 2100. This would trigger many disruptions, including erratic monsoons, the seasonal oceanic winds that deliver most of our annual rains.

Sri Lanka has been oscillating between droughts and floods during the past few years. This time, in fact, both disasters are happening concurrently. This week, the Disaster Management Centre (DMC) confirmed that more than 440,500 people in the Northern Province are adversely affected due by the severe drought that had persisted over many months.

That is more than two thirds of the total number of 646,500 people affected by floods and landslides in the South, as counted on June 1. But slowly-unfolding droughts never get the kind of press that floods inspire.

One thing is clear: disaster management can succeed today only if climate realities are factored in. And coping with climate change’s now inevitable impacts, a process known as climate adaptation, requires technical knowledge combined with proper governance of both natural resources and human systems.

Sri Lanka: Not only oscillating between droughts and floods, but now also having both disasters at the same time. Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera

Adapt or Perish

Sri Lanka joined the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. But 25 years on, climate considerations are not fully factored into our development planning and public investments. State agencies in charge of roads, railways, irrigation works and utilities don’t appear to realise the need to ‘insure’ their installations and operations from climate impacts.

Climate adaptation is not something that the disaster ministry and DMC alone can accomplish. It needs to be a common factor that runs across the entire government, from agriculture and health to power and transport. It needs to be the bedrock of DRR.

In the wake of the latest disaster, technical agencies are highlighting the need to upgrade their systems by acquiring costly equipment. Yet massive big money or high tech systems alone cannot ensure public safety or create resilience.

We need aware and empowered local communities matched by efficient local government bodies. This combination has worked well, for example, in the Philippines, now hailed as a global leader in DRR.

See also:

Better Governance: The Biggest Lesson of 2004 Tsunami. Groundviews.org, 26 Dec 2009.

Nalaka Gunawardene is a science writer and independent media researcher. He is active on Twitter as @NalakaG

[op-ed] Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

First published in International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) South Asia blog on 3 March 2017.

Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka's Right to Information (RTI) law - by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka’s Right to Information (RTI) law – by Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s new Right to Information (RTI) Law, adopted through a rare Parliamentary consensus in June 2016, became fully operational on 3 February 2017.

From that day, the island nation’s 21 million citizens can exercise their legal right to public information held by various layers and arms of government.

One month is too soon to know how this law is changing a society that has never been able to question their rulers – monarchs, colonials or elected governments – for 25 centuries. But early signs are encouraging.

Sri Lanka’s 22-year advocacy for RTI was led by journalists, lawyers, civil society activists and a few progressive politicians. If it wasn’t a very grassroots campaign, ordinary citizens are beginning to seize the opportunity now.

RTI can be assessed from its ‘supply side’ as well as the ‘demand side’. States are primarily responsible for supplying it, i.e. ensuring that all public authorities are prepared and able to respond to information requests. The demand side is left for citizens, who may act as individuals or in groups.

In Sri Lanka, both these sides are getting into speed, but it still is a bumpy road.

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

During February, we noticed uneven levels of RTI preparedness across the 52 government ministries, 82 departments, 386 state corporations and hundreds of other ‘public authorities’ covered by the RTI Act. After a six month preparatory phase, some institutions were ready to process citizen requests from Day One.  But many were still confused, and a few even turned away early applicants.

One such violator of the law was the Ministry of Health that refused to accept an RTI application for information on numbers affected by Chronic Kidney Disease and treatment being given.

Such teething problems are not surprising — turning the big ship of government takes time and effort. We can only hope that all public authorities, across central, provincial and local government, will soon be ready to deal with citizen information requests efficiently and courteously.

Some, like the independent Election Commission, have already set a standard for this by processing an early request for audited financial reports of all registered political parties for the past five years.

On the demand side, citizens from all walks of life have shown considerable enthusiasm. By late February, according to Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, Director General of the Department of Information, more than 1,500 citizen RTI requests had been received. How many of these requests will ultimately succeed, we have to wait and see.

Reports in the media and social media indicate that the early RTI requests cover a wide range of matters linked to private grievances or public interest.

Citizens are turning to RTI law for answers that have eluded them for years. One request filed by a group of women in Batticaloa sought information on loved ones who disappeared during the 26-year-long civil war, a question shared by thousands of others. A youth group is helping people in the former conflict areas of the North to ask much land is still being occupied by the military, and how much of it is state-owned and privately-owned. Everywhere, poor people want clarity on how to access various state subsidies.

Under the RTI law, public authorities can’t play hide and seek with citizens. They must provide written answers in 14 days, or seek an extension of another 21 days.

To improve their chances and avoid hassle, citizens should ask their questions as precisely as possible, and know the right public authority to lodge their requests. Civil society groups can train citizens on this, even as they file RTI requests of their own.

That too is happening, with trade unions, professional bodies and other NGOs making RTI requests in the public interest. Some of these ask inconvenient yet necessary questions, for example on key political leaders’ asset declarations, and an official assessment of the civil war’s human and property damage (done in 2013).

Politicians and officials are used to dodging such queries under various pretexts, but the right use of RTI law by determined citizens can press them to open up – or else.

President Maithripala Sirisena was irked that a civil society group wanted to see his asset declaration. His government’s willingness to obey its own law will be a litmus test for yahapalana (good governance) pledges he made to voters in 2015.

The Right to Information Commission will play a decisive role in ensuring the law’s proper implementation. “These are early days for the Commission which is still operating in an interim capacity with a skeletal staff from temporary premises,” it said in a media statement on February 10.

The real proof of RTI – also a fundamental right added to Constitution in 2015 – will be in how much citizens use it to hold government accountable and to solve their pressing problems. Watch this space.

Science writer and media researcher Nalaka Gunawardene is active on Twitter as @NalakaG. Views in this post are his own.

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

[Op-ed]: Lankan Civil Society’s Unfinished Business in 2017

Sri Lanka's Prime Minister (left) and President trying to make the yaha-palanaya (good governance) jigsaw: Cartoon by Anjana Indrajith

Sri Lanka’s Prime Minister (left) and President trying to make the yaha-palanaya (good governance) jigsaw: Cartoon by Anjana Indrajith

As 2016 drew to a close, The Sunday Leader newspaper asked me for my views on Lankan civil society’s key challenges in 2017. I had a word limit of 350. Here is what I wrote, published in their edition of 1 January 2017:

Lankan Civil Society’s Unfinished Business in 2017

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sections of Sri Lanka’s civil society were closely associated with the political changes that happened at the presidential and general elections in 2015. That was only natural as the notion of good governance had been articulated and promoted by civil society for years before Maithri and Ranil embraced it.

Now, as we enter 2017, civil society faces the twin challenges of holding the current government to account, and preventing yaha-palanaya ideal from being discredited by expedient politicians. At the same time, civil society must also become more professionalised and accountable.

‘Civil society’ is a basket term: it covers a variety of entities outside the government and corporate sectors. These include not only non-governmental organisations (NGOs) but also trade unions, student unions, professional associations (and federations), and community based or grassroots groups. Their specific mandates differ, but on the whole civil society strives for a better, safer and healthier society for everyone.

The path to such a society lies inevitably through a political process, which civil society cannot and should not avoid. Some argue that civil society’s role is limited to service delivery. In reality, worthy tasks like tree planting, vaccine promoting and microcredit distributing are all necessary, but not all sufficient if fundamentals are not in place. For lasting change to happen, civil society must engage with the core issues of governance, rights and social justice.

Ideally, however, civil society groups should not allow themselves to be used or subsumed by political parties. I would argue that responsible civil society groups now set the standards for our bickering and hesitant politicians to aspire to.

Take, for example, two progressive legal measures adopted during 2016: setting aside a 25% mandatory quota for women in local government elections, and legalising the Right to Information. Both these had long been advocated by enlightened civil society groups. They must now stay vigilant to ensure the laws are properly implemented.

Other ideals, like the March 12 Movement for ensuring clean candidates at all elections, need sustained advocacy. So Lankan civil society has plenty of unfinished business in 2017.

Nalaka Gunawardene writes on science, development and governance issues. He tweets from @NalakaG.

Note: Cartoons appearing here did not accompany the article published in The Sunday Leader.

After 18 months in office, Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena seems less keen on his electoral promises of good governance, which he articulated with lots of help from civil society. Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror, 24 June 2016.

After 18 months in office, Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena seems less keen on his electoral promises of good governance, which he had articulated with lots of help from civil society. Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror, 24 June 2016.

Right to Information (RTI): Sri Lanka can learn much from South Asian Experiences

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at RTI Seminar for Sri Lanka Parliament staff, 16 Aug 2016

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at RTI Seminar for Sri Lanka Parliament staff, 16 Aug 2016

 

On 16 August 2016, I was invited to speak to the entire senior staff of the Parliament of Sri Lanka on Right to Information (RTI) – South Asian experiences.

Sri Lanka’s Parliament passed the Right to Information (RTI) law on 24 June 2016. Over 15 years in the making, the RTI law represents a potential transformation across the whole government by opening up hitherto closed public information (with certain clearly specified exceptions related to national security, trade secrets, privacy and intellectual property, etc.).

This presentation introduces the concept of citizens’ right to demand and access public information held by the government, and traces the evolution of the concept from historical time. In fact, Indian Emperor Ashoka (who reigned from c. 268 to 232 Before Christ) was the first to grant his subjects the Right to Information, according to Indian RTI activist Venkatesh Nayak, Coordinator, Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI). Ashoka had inscribed on rocks all over the Indian subcontinent his government’s policies, development programmes and his ideas on various social, economic and political issues — including how religious co-existence.

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at RTI Seminar for Parliament staff, Sri Lanka - 16 Aug 2016

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks at RTI Seminar for Parliament staff, Sri Lanka – 16 Aug 2016

Therefore, adopting an RTI law signifies upholding a great Ashokan tradition in Sri Lanka. The presentation looks at RTI good practices and implementation experiences in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Maldives – all these South Asian countries passed an RTI law before Sri Lanka, and there is much that Sri Lanka can learn from them.

The presentation ends acknowledging the big challenges in implementing RTI in Sri Lanka – reorienting the entire public sector to change its mindset and practices to promote a culture of information sharing and transparent government.

 

 

Right to Information (RTI): Citizens Benefit Most!

On 11 May 2016, Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Parliamentary Reforms & Mass Media convened a meeting with the senior managers of print and broadcasting media house to discuss how media can support the new Right to Information (RTI) law that has recently been tabled in Parliament.

Nearly 15 years in the making, the RTI law is to be debated in June and expected to be adopted with multi-party consensus. The law represents a transformation across government by opening up hitherto closed public information (with certain cleared specified exceptions).

While media can also benefit from RTI, it is primarily a law for ordinary citizens to demand and receive information related to everyday governance (most of it at local levels). For this, citizens need to understand the RTI process and potential benefits. Media can play a major role in explaining RTI law, and promoting its use in many different ways to promote the public interest and to nurture a culture of evidence-based advocacy for good governance and public accountability.

This presentation was made by media researcher and columnist Nalaka Gunawardene in his capacity as a member of the voluntary Right to Information Task Force convened by the Ministry of Parliamentary Reforms & Mass Media. He illustrates how RTI can benefit citizens, and shares examples from other South Asian countries where newspapers and broadcast houses have been promoting RTI in innovative ways.

 

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #266: තොරතුරු නීතියේ වැඩිම ප‍්‍රයෝජන සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියන්ටයි!

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 1 May 2016), I return to the topic of Sri Lanka’s new Right to Information (RTI) law that has recently been tabled in Parliament.

Over 15 years in the making, the RTI law is to be debated in June and expected to be adopted with multi-party consensus. The law represents a transformation across government by opening up hitherto closed public information (with certain cleared specified exceptions).

While media can also benefit from RTI, it is primarily a law for ordinary citizens to demand and receive information related to everyday governance (most of it at local levels). For this, citizens need to understand the RTI process and potential benefits. Media can play a major role in explaining RTI law, and promoting its use in many different ways to promote the public interest and to nurture a culture of evidence-based advocacy for good governance and public accountability.

In this column, I look at how RTI can benefit citizens, and share examples from other South Asian countries where even school children are using RTI to solve local level problems that affect their family, school or local community.

RTI Law is like a key that opens government information

RTI Law is like a key that opens government information

වසර 15ක පමණ සිවිල් සමාජ අරගලයකින් පසුව ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ තොරතුරු අයිතිය තහවුරු කැරෙන නව නීතිය කෙටුම්පතක් ලෙස පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ සභාගත කොට තිබෙනවා. ඉදිරි සති කිහිපය තුළ මෙය විවාදයට ගෙන සම්මත වීමට නියමිතයි.

2015 අපේ‍්‍රල් මාසයේ සම්මත වූ 19 වන ව්‍යවස්ථා සංශෝධනය මගින් දැනටමත් තොරතුරු දැන ගැනීමේ අයිතිය මෙරට මූලික මානව අයිතියක් ලෙස පිළිගෙන හමාරයි. මේ නීතිය කරන්නේ එය ප‍්‍රායෝගිකව ක‍්‍රියාත්මක කිරීමට අවශ්‍ය ක‍්‍රමවේදය බිහි කිරීමයි.

එසේම තොරතුරු අයිතියට අදාළ වන්නේ කුමන රාජ්‍ය ආයතන හා කිනම් ආකාරයේ තොරතුරුද, හෙළිදරව් කළ නොහැකි තොරතුරු වර්ග මොනවාද (ව්‍යතිරේක) හා හෙළිදරව් කළ යුතු තොරතුරු නොදී සිටින රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරීන්ට එරෙහිව පුරවැසියන්ට ගත හැකි පරිපාලනමය ක‍්‍රියාමාර්ග මොනවාද ආදිය මේ පනතෙන් විස්තර කැරෙනවා.

මේ කෙටුම්පත භාෂා තුනෙන්ම පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ වෙබ් අඩවියෙන් බලාගත හැකියි. http://www.parliament.lk/uploads/bills/gbills/english/6007.pdf

මේ හැකියාව තිබියදීත් පනත් කෙටුම්පත නොකියවා අනුමාන හෝ  ඕපාදුප මත පදනම් වී මේ ගැන දුර්මත පතුරු වන අයත් සිටිනවා. (මෑතදී මට දුරකථනයෙන් කතා කළ එක් ජාතික පුවත්පතක මාධ්‍යවේදියෙක් ඇසුවේ තොරතුරු පනත මගින් මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ට හා සෙසු පුරවැසියන්ට දඬුවම් දීමට අදහස් කරනවාද කියායි!)

තොරතුරු අයිතිය හා නීතිය ගැන මීට පෙර කිහිප වතාවක් අප මේ තීරු ලිපියේ සාකච්ඡා කළා. යළිත් මේ තේමාවට පිවිසෙන්නේ තවමත් මේ සංකල්පය ලක් සමාජයට ආගන්තුක නිසායි.

ලෝකයේ මුල්ම තොරතුරු නීතිය සම්මත වී 2016ට වසර 250ක් සපිරෙනවා. 1766දී එම නීතිය හඳුන්වා දුන්නේ ස්වීඩනයේ. එදා මෙදාතුර රටවල් 100කට වැඩි ගණනක තොරතුරු නීති සම්මත කරගෙන තිබෙනවා.

අපේ සාර්ක් කලාපයේ තොරතුරු නීතියක් නොමැතිව සිටි එකම රට ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවයි. ශිෂ්ට සම්පන්න ජන සමාජයකට හා ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී රාජ්‍ය පාලනයකට අත්‍යවශ්‍ය යැයි සැලකෙන මේ නීතිය ප‍්‍රමාද වී හෝ අපට ලැබීම හොඳයි. එහෙත් මේ නීතිය සාර්ථක වන්නේ එය ගැන සමස්ත ජන සමාජයම දැනුවත් හා උද්‍යෝගිමත් වූ විට පමණයි.

බොහෝ නීති පනවන්නේ රජයට යම් ඉලක්ක හා අරමුණු සාක්ෂාත් කර ගන්න. එහෙත් තොරතුරු නීතිය මහජනයා අතට ලැබෙන, ඔවුන් බලාත්මක කළ හැකි නීතියක්.

A009-001(1)

තොරතුරු නීතිය මාධ්‍යවේදීන් සඳහා යයි මතයක් පවතිනවා. හිටපු ජනාධිපතිවරයා වරක් කතුවරුන් අමතමින් කීවේ ‘ඔබට තොරතුරු නීතියක් මොකටද?  ඕනෑ දෙයක් මගෙන් අහන්න’ කියායි!

මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ටද තොරතුරු නීතිය උපකාර වෙතත් තමන්ට අවශ්‍ය සැඟවුණු තොරතුරු සොයා යෑමේ උපක‍්‍රම ඔවුන් සතුව තිබෙනවා. එවැනි ආයතනික හෝ සිවිල් බලයක් නොමැති සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියන්ට රාජ්‍ය ආයතන සතු තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා ලබාගන්නට අයිතියක් තහවුරු කරන්නේ තොරතුරු නීතිය මගින්.

මහජන මුදලින් නඩත්තු කැරෙන මහජන සේවයට පිහිටුවා ඇති රාජ්‍ය ආයතනවල ක‍්‍රියාකලාපය විමර්ශනය කිරීමට එම මහජනයාට ඇති අයිතිය තහවුරු කිරීමයි  තොරතුරු නීතිය මගින් කරන්නේ.

ඕනෑම රටක තොරතුරු නීතියක් සාර්ථක වන්නේ එහි තමන්ට තිබෙන ප‍්‍රායෝගික වැදගත්කම හා එය භාවිතය ගැන මහජනයා දැනුවත් වූ තරමටයි.

නීතිඥ ගිහාන් ගුණතිලක 2014දී ලියූ, ශ‍්‍රී ලංකා පුවත්පත් ආයතනය පළ කළ තොරතුරු නීතිය පිළිබඳ අත්පොතෙහි මේ ප‍්‍රයෝජන උදාහරණ කිහිපයකින් පැහැදිලි කරනවා.

උදාහරණ 1: අපේ නිවෙස ඉදිරියෙන් දිවෙන පාර අබලන් වී තිබූ නිසා එය පිළිසකර කරනු ලබනවා. එහෙත් එහි ප‍්‍රමිතිය හා නිමාව සැක සහිතයි. මේ ගැන පුරවැසියන් ලෙස අපට කුමක් කළ හැකිද?

තොරතුරු අයිතිය යටතේ පාර පිළිසකර කිරීමට අදාළ පළාත් පාලන ආයතනයෙන් හෝ මාර්ග සංවර්ධන අධිකාරියෙන් හෝ විමසිය හැකි වනවා. ඒ සඳහා කොපමණ මහජන මුදල් ප‍්‍රතිපාදන වෙන් කළාද, කොන්ත‍්‍රාත් දීමට ටෙන්ඩර් කැඳ වූවාද, වැය කළ මුදල් ද්‍රව්‍යවලට හා වේතනවලට බෙදී ගියේ කෙසේද ආදි සියල්ල හෙළි කිරීමට අදාළ ආයතනයට සිදු වනවා.

බොහෝ විට මේ තොරතුරු පිටු රැසකින් සමන්විත ෆයිල් එකක් විය හැකියි. එය ලද පසු අධ්‍යයනය කොට මහජන මුදල් නිසි ලෙස වැය වී ඇත්ද හා එසේ නැතිනම් ඇයිද යන්න දත හැකියි. මේ දක්වා සැකය හා අනුමානය පදනම් කර ගෙන කළ තර්ක හා චෝදනා මින් පසු තොරතුරු සාක්ෂි මත පදනම්ව කළ හැකි වනවා.

උදාහරණ 2: හැම වසරකම රටේ මහත් ආන්දෝලනයක් ඇතිකරන ක‍්‍රියාදාමයක් නම් රජයේ පාසල්වලට දරුවන් ඇතුළු කර ගැනීමයි. ක‍්‍රමවේදයක් ස්ථාපිත කොට තිබෙත්, නිසි පාරදෘශ්‍යභාවයක් නැති නිසා අක‍්‍රමිකතා හා දුෂණ රැසකට ඉඩ පෑදී තිබෙනවා.

තොරතුරු නීතිය යටතේ මේ ක‍්‍රමවේදය ගැන  ඕනෑම රජයේ පාසලකින් විස්තරාත්මක තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා සිටීමට පුරවැසි අපට හැකි වනවා. දරුවන් ඇතුළු කිරීමට යොදා ගත් නිර්ණායක මොනවාද, ඉල්ලූම් කළ සමස්ත සංඛ්‍යාව අතරින් තෝරා ගත් දරුවන් ඒ නිර්ණායක සියල්ල සපුරා සිටියාද, ප‍්‍රතික්ෂේප කිරීමට නිශ්චිත හේතු මොනවාද ආදි සියලූ තොරතුරු හා තීරණ හෙළි කරන ලෙස තොරතුරු නීතිය යටතේ අපට බල කළ හැකියි.

උදාහරණ 3: ගොවිතැන් වැඩිපුර කරන ප‍්‍රදේශයක ගොවීන්ට ජලය ලබා දීමට නව ඇළ මාර්ග ඉදි කිරීමට මහජන මුදල් වෙන් කැරෙනවා. එය එසේ කළ බවත්, මාධ්‍ය හරහා වාර්තා වනවා. එහෙත් මාස හා වසර ගණනක් ගෙවී ගියත් ඇළ මාර්ග ඉදි වන්නේ නැහැ. කුමක් වූවාදැයි නොදැන ගොවීන් වික්ෂිප්තව සිටිනවා.

තොරතුරු නීතිය යටතේ තව දුරටත් නොදන්නාකමින් හා අවිනිශ්චිත බවින් කල් ගෙවිය යුතු නැහැ. වාරි ඇළ මාර්ග සඳහා වෙන් කළ ප‍්‍රතිපාදනවලට කුමක් වූවාද,  එය වෙනත් දෙයකට යොදා ගත්තාද, නැතිනම් වැය නොකිරීම නිසා යළිත් භාණ්ඩාගාරයට ගියාද, එසේ නම් ඒ සඳහා වගකිව යුත්තේ කවුද ආදි මේ සියල්ල ගැන පරිපාලන තොරතුරු  ඕනැම පුරවැසියකු ඉල්ලා සිටියොත් හෙළි කිරීමට අදාළ රාජ්‍ය ආයතනයට සිදු වනවා. එහිදී තොරතුරු ඉල්ලීම පීඩාවට පත් ගොවීන්ට පමණක් නොව සියලූ පුරවැසියන් සතු අයිතියක්.

උදාහරණ 4: රටේ බහුතරයක් ජනයා සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා සඳහා යන්නේ රජයේ රෝහල්වලට. මහජන මුදලින් නඩත්තු කැරෙන රාජ්‍ය සෞඛ්‍ය සේවා පද්ධතියේ අඩුපාඩු තිබෙනවා. වාර්ෂිකව සෞඛ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයට අති විශාල මුදලක් වෙන් කළත්, පරිපාලන දුර්වලතා නිසා හැම විටම නිසි ප‍්‍රතිඵල ලැබෙන්නේ නැහැ.

තමන්ට අදාළ රජයේ රෝහලක කටයුතු සිදු වන ආකාරය ගැන සෑහීමකට පත්විය නොහැකි නම් ආයතනයේ පරිපාලන තොරතුරු ඉල්ලීමට නව නීතිය යටතේ පුරවැසියන්ට අයිතියක් ලැබෙනවා.

බෙහෙත් හිඟය, රෝග විනිශ්චයට උපකාර වන පරීක්ෂණ පහසුකම් ක‍්‍රියාත්මක නොවීම, වෛද්‍යවරුන් අනුයුක්ත නොකිරීම ආදි  ඕනෑම කරුණක් ගැන අනුමාන හා සැකයක් මත පදනම් වී චෝදනා කරනු වෙනුවට සැබෑ තොරතුරු ලබා ගෙන, ඒවා විමර්ශනය කොට වඩාත් නිවැරදි නිගමනවලට එළැඹීමට හැකි වනවා.

තවත් උදාහරණ  ඕනෑ තරම් අපට පරිකල්පනය කළ හැකියි.

Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Daily Mirror newspaper Sri Lanka

Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Daily Mirror newspaper Sri Lanka

රජයේ ආයතනයක ඇති වන පුරප්පාඩු පිරවීමේදී නිසි ක‍්‍රමවේදයක් අනුගමනය කළාද කියා දැන ගැනීමට එම තනතුරුවලට ඉල්ලූම් කළ, එහෙත් නොලද  ඕනෑම කෙනකුට හැකි වනවා. පොලිසිය සමග කැරෙන ගනුදෙනුවලදී දැනට වඩා පාරදෘශ්‍ය වීමට පොලිස් තන්ත‍්‍රයට තොරතුරු නීති හරහා බල කළ හැකියි.

තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා සිටින මහජනයා නොතකා සිටීමට හෝ අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස කල් දමමින් රස්තියාදු කිරීමට ඇති අවකාශ ඇහිරීම අලූතෙන් පිහිටුවීමට නියමිත තොරතුරු කොමිසමේ වගකීමයි. ව්‍යතිරේකවලට සම්බන්ධ නොවූ වෙනත්  ඕනෑම තොරතුරක් නොදී සිටින (මධ්‍යම, පළාත් සභා හා පළාත් පාලන ආයතන මට්ටමේ) රාජ්‍ය ආයතන ගැන මෙකී තොරතුරු කොමිසමට පැමිණිලි කළ හැකි වනවා.

තොරතුරු නීතිය මෙවලමක් කර ගෙන යහපාලනය ඉල්ලා සිටීම පුරවැසි අප සැමගේ යුතුකමක් හා වගකීමක්.

තොරතුරු නීතිය ප‍්‍රාන්ත මට්ටමින් 1990 දශකයේ මැද භාගයේ පටන්ද ජාතික මට්ටමින් 2005 සිටද ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වන ඉන්දියාවේ එම නීතිවලින් වැඩිපුරම ප‍්‍රයෝජන ගන්නේ සාමාන්‍ය පුරවැසියෝ. මාධ්‍ය හෝ සිවිල් සංවිධානවලට වඩා ඉදිරියෙන් සිටින්නේ ඔවුන්.

තොරතුරු අයිතිය බාල මහලූ, උගත් නූගත් හැම පුරවැසියෙකුටම හිමි වන්නක්. ඡන්ද බලය මෙන් යම් වයස් සීමාවකින් ඔබ්බට ගිය පසු ලැබෙන්නක් නොවෙයි.

foi-laws

ඉන්දියාවේ පාසල් සිසුන් හා ළාබාල දරුවන් පවා තොරතුරු නීතියෙන් ප‍්‍රයෝජන ගන්නවා. මේ ගැන රසවත් උදාහරණයක් ගිය වසරේ වාර්තා වුණා.

දකුණු ඉන්දියාවේ හයිද්‍රාබාද් නුවරට සමීප නිසාමාබාද් දිස්ත‍්‍රික්කයේ වයස 10-12 අතර පාසල් සිසුන් තොරතුරු නීතිය යටතේ මහජන තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා අවස්ථා හතරකදී සාර්ථකව එය ලබා ගත්තා.

දස හැවිරිදි මනෝජ්ට තිබූ ප‍්‍රශ්නය බීඩි එතීමේ නිරත වූ මව්පියන්ගේ දරුවන්ට කම්කරු දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව දෙන ඉන්දියානු රුපියල් 1,000ක වාර්ෂික ශිෂ්‍යාධාරය නොලැබීමයි. මව්පියන් සුසුම් හෙළමින් සිටින අතර මනෝ්ජ් මේ අසාධාරණයට අදාළ තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා කම්කරු දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවට ගියා. මෙයින් කලබලයට පත් කම්කරු නිලධාරීන් ශිෂ්‍යාධාර හිඟ මුදල් ලබා දී ප‍්‍රමාදයට හේතු දක්වන ලියුමක් ද මේ දරුවාට යැව්වා.

මෙයින් දිරිමත් වූ මනෝජ් තම ප‍්‍රදේශයේ පුරාවිද්‍යාත්මක වැදගත්කම ගැන පුරාවිද්‍යා දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවෙන් තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා එය ලබා ගත්තා. එයද තොරතුරු නීතිය යටතේයි.

මේ දෙස බලා සිටි ඔහුගේ පාසල් සගයෝ වෙනස් ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන තොරතුරු ඉල්ලීම් ගොනු කරන්න පටන් ගත්තා. කවීතා නම් ළාබාල දැරිය තම ගමට හරියට බස් සේවාවක් නොතිබීමට හේතු විමසා සිටියා. අදාළ නිලධාරීන් ප‍්‍රතිචාර නොදැක් වූ විට ඇය තොරතුරු නීති ඉල්ලීමක් ගොනු කළා.

ප‍්‍රාන්ත රජයට හිමි බස් සමාගම මුලින් කීවේ එම මාර්ගයේ බස් ධාවනය පාඩු ලබන බවයි. එහෙත් දැරිය ඉල්ලූ තොරතුරුවලින් එය එසේ නොවන බව ගම්වාසීන්ට පෙනී ගියා. අන්තිමේදී බස් සේවය නැවත ස්ථාපිත කිරීමට රාජ්‍ය බස් සමාගමට සිදු වුණා. මේ නිසා ඒ ගමින් අවට පාසල්වලට යන ශිෂ්‍ය සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩිවුණා.

මෙවන් උදාහරණ විශාල ගණනක් ගෙවී ගිය දශකයේ ඉන්දියාවෙන් වාර්තාගතයි. අපට වඩා සාක්ෂරතාවෙන් අඩු ඉන්දීය මහජනයා මෙතරම් නිර්මාණශීලීව හා ධෛර්යමත්ව තොරතුරු නීතිය තම ප‍්‍රශ්න විසඳීමට යොදා ගන්නා සැටි තොරතුරු නීතිය ලැබීමට ආසන්න ලක් සමාජයට මාහැඟි ආදර්ශයක්.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #253: රටවැසියන්ට සවන් දෙන, සංවාදයට රිසි ජනාධිපතිවරයෙක් ඕනෑ කර තිබේ!

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 17 January 2016), I critique the public communications practices President Maithripala Sirisena of Sri Lanka – and call for better listening and more engagement by the head of state.

I point out that Sirisena is in danger of overexposure in the mainstream media, which I call the ‘Premadasa Syndrome’ (as this bad practice was started by President R Premadasa who was in office from 1988 to May 1993). I argue that citizens don’t need to be force-fed a daily dose of presidential activities on prime time news or in the next day’s newspapers. If public documentation is needed, use the official website.

Like other politicians in Sri Lanka, Sirisena uses key social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to simply disseminate his speeches, messages and photos. But his official website has no space for citizens to comment. That is old school broadcasting, not engaging.

This apparent aloofness, and the fact that he has not done a single Twitter/Facebook Q&A session before or after the election, detracts from his image as a consultative political leader.

On the whole, I would far prefer to see a more engaged (yet far less preachy!) presidency. It would be great to have our First Citizen using mainstream media as well as new media platforms to have regular conversations with the rest of us citizens on matters of public interest. A growing number of modern democratic rulers prefer informal citizen engagement without protocol or pomposity. President Sirisena is not yet among them.

See my English essay which covers similar ground: Yahapalanaya at One: When will our leaders ‘walk the talk’? Groundviews.org, 4 January 2016

President Maithripala Sirisena (seated) launched Tell the President service on 8 January 2016 - Photo by Presidential Media Division

President Maithripala Sirisena (seated) launched Tell the President service on 8 January 2016 – Photo by Presidential Media Division

ජනාධිපති මෛත‍්‍රීපාල සිරිසේනගේ පදවි ප‍්‍රාප්තියේ ප‍්‍රථම සංවත්සරය යෙදුණු 2016 ජනවාරි 9 වනදා ජනපතිට කියන්න නම් නව සේවාව ඇරඹුණා.

තැපැල් පෙට්ටි අංක 123 වෙත යොමු කරන ලියුමක් හරහාත්, දුරකථන අංක 1919 හරහාත් ජනතාවට සිය ප‍්‍රශ්න හා ගැටලූ ඉදිරිපත් කළ හැකි බවයි මේ සේවය හඳුන්වා දෙමින් කියැවුණේ. එයට අමතරව ජනපතිගේ නිල වෙබ් අඩවියත් (http://tell.president.gov.lk/), ජංගම දුරකථන ඇප් එකක් හරහාත් විමසීම් හා පැමිණිලි යොමු කළ හැකියි.

මෙය හොඳ අරමුණකින් කරන උත්සාහයක්. ගාල්ලෙන් බිහි වූ දක්ෂ මාධ්‍යවේදියකු වන සජීව විජේවීරත් මෙයට සම්බන්ධයි. ‘යහපාලනයේදී ජනාධිපතිවරයා තනි නොකරමු’ යයි කියමින් තමන් මෙයට දායක වූ සැටි ගැන ඔහුගේ ෆේස්බුක් එකෙන් ගිය සතියේ කෙටි විස්තරයක් පළ කර තිබුණා.

යහපාලන රජයේ මහජන සන්නිවේදන පිළිවෙත් හා ක‍්‍රියාකලාපය ඇගැයීමකට ලක් කරන්නට මෙය හොඳ අවස්ථාවක් යයි මා සිතනවා.

යහපාලනයේ මොන අඩුපාඩු හා විසමතා තිබුණත් භාෂණ නිදහස හා ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස නම් අපට ලැබී තිබෙනවා. එහි ප‍්‍රතිඵලයක් ලෙස අද අපට රටේ ජනපති හා අගමැති දෙපළත්, ඇමතිවරුනුත් නොබියව විවේචනය කළ හැකියි.

මේ නිදහස ගෙවි ගිය වසර පුරා මා රායෝගිකව අත්හදා බැලූවා. රටේ නායකයන් දෙපළ හේතු සහගතව හා කිසිදු දේශපාලන මතවාදී එල්බ ගැනීමකින් තොරව විවේචනය කිරීමට යළිත් හැකි වීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

එහෙත් නායකයන් පොදු අවකාශයේ කැරෙන විවේචන හා වෙනත් අදහස් පළ කිරීම්වලට සංවේදීද? ඔවුන් මේවා ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටිනවාද? ඔවුන්ගේ කාර්යමණ්ඩල රටවැසියන්ගේ සිතුම් පැතුම් ගැන නිවැරදි ප‍්‍රතිශෝෂණයක් ජනපති හා අගමැති දෙපළට ලබා දෙනවාද?

යහපාලනයේ වසරක් ගෙවී ගියද මේවාට පිළිතුරු හරිහැටි පැහැදිලි නැහැ.

රටේ ජනපතිවරයා රටවැසියා සමග සන්නිවේදනය කරන සැටි මා කලෙක සිට අධ්‍යයනය කරනවා. සිරිසේන ජනපතිගේ සන්නිවේදන රටා මේ වන විට පැහැදිලියි.

සිරිසේනගේ මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රකාශයේ (දෙසැම්බර් 2014) 62 වන පිටුවේ මෙසේද සඳහන් වනවා. ‘දියුණු වන සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයත් සමාජ මාධ්‍යයන්හි ව්‍යාප්තියත්, සමාජ යහපතටම හේතු වන පරිදි කළමනාකරණය කර ගැනීම සඳහා මාධ්‍ය සංවර්ධන ප‍්‍රතිපත්තියත් බලගැන්වීමටද කටයුතු කරමි.’

ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති මට්ටමින් ඉදිරියට යාම අවශ්‍යයි. එහෙත් එයට සමාන්තරව ක‍්‍රියාවෙන් ද ආදර්ශයක් දීමට රටේ නායකයාට හැකියි.

රාජ්‍ය නායකයා සන්නිවේදනය කිරීම යනු හැම ජනමාධ්‍යකින්ම හැකි තාක් ඔහුගේ හෝ ඇයගේ ප‍්‍රතිරූපය පිම්බීම නොවෙයි. මේ අතිශය අදුරදර්ශී සම්ප‍්‍රදාය ඇරඹුණේ පේ‍්‍රමදාස ජනාධිපති කාලයේදීයි. රාජ්‍ය හා පෞද්ගලික මාධ්‍ය හරහා අනිවාර්යයෙන්ම දිනපතා ජනපති පුවත් ආවරණය කළ යුතුව තිබුණා. ඒ ගැන රටේ උපහාසාත්මක කතාද එකල පැතිරුණා. ඇත්තටම එය රටටම විහිලුවක් වුණා.

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

එයින් පසුව පත් වූ ජනාධිපතිවරුන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ සහචරයන් ද කළේ පේ‍්‍රමදාස මාවතේම යාමයි (විජේතුංග හැරෙන්නට). එහි අන්තයටම ගියේ මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂයි. මාධ් හරහා අධිආවරණය තුළින් තම නායකයාගේ අගය අඩු වන බව හා මහජන අපරසාදය වැඩි වන බව නායකයා වටා සිටින අය තේරුම් ගත්තේ නැහැ. නැතහොත් තාවකාලික ප‍්‍රමෝදයක් තකා නොදන්නා සේ සිටියා විය යුතුයි.

2015 නොවැම්බරයේ ජනාධිපති මාධ්‍ය ඒකකයේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය අමතා දේශනයක් කිරීමට මට ඇරයුම් කරනු ලැබුවා. එහිදී විවෘත හා විවේචනාත්මක මත දැක්වීමක් කරමින් මා උදක්ම ඉල්ලා සිටියේ ‘පේ‍්‍රමදාස ව්‍යාධියෙන්’ ජනාධිපති සිරිසේන රෝගී වීමට ඉඩ නොතබන ලෙසයි. එසේ වීමේ පෙරනිමිති මා දකින බවද කීවාග

රටේ නායකයා කුමක් කරන්නේද යන්න දැන ගැනීමට රටවැසියන්ට අයිතියක් තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් ඔහු සහභාගි වන හැම මුල්ගල තැබීම, විවෘත කිරීම, අමුත්තන් බැහැ දැකීම හා සෙසු කටයුතු ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මුද්‍රිත හා විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය හරහා ප‍්‍රචාරණය කිරීම අවශ්‍ය නැහැ.

ඕනෑම නම් ඒ සඳහා ජනාධිපති නිල වෙබ් අඩවිය යොදාගත හැකියි. එවිට (කැමති කෙනෙකුට කැමති විටෙක බලන්නට) තොරතුරු හෙළිදරව් කිරීම ඉහළ මට්ටමින් සිදු වෙතත් පත්තර කියවන, ටෙලිවිෂන් බලන ජනයාට ජනපති ගැන පුවත් කන්දරාවක් බලෙන් පැටවෙන්නේ නැහැ.

දිනපතාම සිල්ලර මට්ටමේ ජනපති පුවත් සියලූ මාධ්‍ය හරහා බෙදා නොහැර විටින් විට ජාතික මට්ටමෙන් වැදගත් නිමිති සඳහා පමණක් සියලූ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ජනයාට සමීප වුවොත් එහි අගය වැඩි වන බවත් මගේ කතාවේදි මා අවධාරණය කළා. එහෙත් මේ උපදෙස් පිළි ගත්තාද යන්න මට සැකයි. මාධ්‍ය මෛත‍්‍රීකරණය දිගටම සිදු වන බවක් පෙනෙන නිසා.

ජනාධිපතිවරයාගේ නව මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය ගැනත් මගේ විචාරයක් තිබෙනවා.

2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයෙන් තේරී පත් වූ විගස සිරිසේන ජනපතිවරයා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල හරහා තමන්ට ලැබුණු ස්වේච්ඡා හා නොනිල සහයෝගයට ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ ස්තූති කළා.

එසේම රටේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන පිරිස සමස්ත ජනගහනයෙන් 25%ක් වී, එය තව දුරටත් ටිකෙන් ටික වැඩි වන කාලයක තනතුරට පත් මේ ජනාපතිවරයාට මින් පෙර කිසිදු නායකයකුට නොතිබූ සන්නිවේදන අවස්ථාවක් උදා වී තිබෙනවා. එනම් සෙසු මාධ්‍යවලට සමාන්තරව නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා ද රටවැසියන් සමග සම්බන්ධ වීමටයි.

සෙසු මාධ්‍ය කිසිවකට වඩා නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා සංවාද කිරීමේ විභවය තිබෙනවා. එසේ කිරීමට ජනපතිට සැම විටම විවේක නැතත්, අඩුම තරමින් (කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය හරහා) සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල ජනයා මතු කරන අදහස් උදහස්වලට සවන් දිය හැකියි. වියදම් අධික ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ නිතර කරනු වෙනුවට බොහෝ ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී රටවල නායකයන් දැන් කරන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කතාබහ නිරීක්ෂණය කිරීමයි.

ජනපති සිරිසේන පදවි ප‍්‍රාප්තියෙන් පසු නිල ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් ගිණුම් ඇරඹුවා. ගෙවී ගිය වසර තුළ ඒවාට ඒකරාශී වූ ජන සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩි වී තිබෙනවා. 2015 මැද පමණ සිට ෆේස්බුක් වේදිකාව මත සිටින ලාංකික දේශපාලන චරිත අතරින් වැඩිම පිරිසක් එක් රැස්ව සිටින්නේ සිරිසේනගේ නිල ගිණුමටයි. (එතෙක් මුල් තැන සිටි මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ දැන් දෙවැනි තැනට පත්වෙලා.)

සිරිසේන නිල ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුමෙන් කරන්නේ ඔහුගේ කතා, සුබපැතුම් හා උත්සව ඡායාරූප බෙදා හැරීම පමණයි. එහි එන පාඨකයන් සමග අන්තර් ක‍්‍රියා සිදුවන්නේ ඉතා අඩුවෙන්. එහෙත් මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ නිල ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම ඔහු තනතුරේ සිටින විටත්, ඉන් පසුවත් වඩා සංවාදශීලී ලෙසින් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සාර්ථකත්වය යනු හුදෙක් ගොඩ වැඩි කර ගැනීම නොවෙයි. එහි එන ජනයා සමග සාකච්ඡාමය ගනුදෙනු වැඩියෙන් කිරීමයි (engagement). සියයකට අධික ජනපති මාධ්‍ය ඒකක කාර්ය මණ්ඩලයේ දෙතුන් දෙනකු මෙයට කැප කිරීම වටිනවාග

ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා කලින් දැනුම් දෙන ලද නිශ්චිත කාලයක (පැය 2-3) මහජන ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පිළිතුරු දීමේ සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් මතුව තිබෙනවා (FB/Twitter Q&A). මහින්ද රාජපක්ෂ මෙන්ම චම්පික රණවක වැනි ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ දේශපාලකයන්ද මෙය විටින් විට කරනවා. එහිදි ලැබෙන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන කිසිදු පාලනයක්/වාරණයක් කළ නොහැකි නමුත් තමන් කැමති ප‍්‍රශ්නවලට පමණක් තෝරා ගෙන කෙටියෙන් පිළිතුරු දිය හැකියි.

කණගාටුවට කරුණ වන්නේ ජනපති සිරිසේන හෝ අගමැති විකරමසිංහ වසරක් ගත වීත් කිසි විටෙක මෙබන්දක් නොකිරීමයි. සයිබර් අවකාශය හරහා රට වැසියන්ට මුහුණ දීමට ඇයි මෙතරම් පැකිලෙන්නේ?

Tell the President web banner

Tell the President web banner

‘ජනපතිට කියන්න’ සේවාවෙන් මේ අඩුපාඩු සපිරෙන්නේ නැහැ. එය ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් මෙන් විවෘත හා පාරදෘශ්‍ය වේදිකාවක් නොවෙයි.

සේවාව ඇරැඹුණු දවසේම රාජ්‍ය තොරතුරු සේවය දුරකථන අංක 1919 හරහා මා ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් යොමු කළා. එනම් මාධ්‍යවේදී ලසන්ත වික‍්‍රමතුංග ඝාතනයට ලක් වී එදිනට හරියටම වසර 7ක් පිරුණත්, යහපාලන පොරොන්දුවක් වූ එම අපරාධ විමර්ශනය කඩිනම් කිරීමට දැන් සිදු වන්නේ කුමක්ද යන්නයි.

මෙය පොදු උන්නතියට අදාළ ප‍්‍රශ්නයක්. මෙබඳු ප‍්‍රශ්න පොදු අවකාශයේ විවෘතව රාජ්‍ය නායකයන්ගෙන් ඇසිය හැකි නම් එහි වටිනාකම වැඩියි. එසේම මට ලැබෙන උත්තරය ද පොදු අවකාශයේ කාටත් කියවා ගත හැකි විවෘත එකක් විය හැකි නම් වඩාත් හොඳයි.

ජනපතිට කියන්න සේවය විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණයට (Open Government) තුඩු දෙන්නක් නොවන්නේ ඉහත කී සීමා නිසායි. මුල් පැය 24 තුළ ප‍්‍රතිචාර 3,000කට වඩා ලැබුණා යයි මාධ්‍ය වාර්තා කළත් ඒවා මොනවාද? කෙතරම් ඉක්මනින් ජනපති පිළිතුරු ලබා දෙනවාද යන්න දැනගත හැකි ක‍්‍රමයක් නැහැ.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #246: තොරතුරු අයිතිය විවෘත ආණ්ඩුකරණයට මුල් පියවරයි

පෞද්ගලික ප‍්‍රශ්න, ආයාචනා හා පැමිණිලි යොමු කිරීමේදී සංවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයකුත්, පොදු ප‍්‍රශ්න සඳහා විවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයකුත් අවශ්‍යයි. මේ විවෘත ක‍්‍රමවේදයට කිසිදු අලූත් පරිශ‍්‍රමයක් දැරිය යුතු නැහැ. ජනාධිපතිවරයාගේ පවතින ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් නිල ගිණුම් හරහාම කළ හැකියි.

එවන් විවෘත සයිබර් සංවාදයක තවත් වැදගත්කමක් නම් මතු පරිශීලනය සඳහා වෙබ්ගතව සංරක්ෂණය වීමයි. කලින් කලට වචනය වෙනස් කරන දේශපාලකයන් මෙයට නොරිසි විය හැකි වුවත් ප‍්‍රතිපත්තිගරුක හා අවංක ජන නායකයකුට තමන් අද කියන දෙය ලබන සතියේ, ඉදිරි මාසයක හෝ වසරක කාටත් ලෙහෙසියෙන් බලා ගත හැකි පරිදි සංරක්ෂණය වීම ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් නොවෙයි.

ජනපතිට කියන්න සේවාව කිනම් රාමුවක් තුළ පවත්වා ගන්නවාද යන්න පැහැදිලි නැහැ. එහෙත් මේ හරහා යළිත් වරක් රටේ හැම මට්ටමේම ප‍්‍රශ්න ජනපතිවරයාට කේන්ද්‍ර වීමේ අවදානමක් ද තිබෙනවා.

හිටපු ජනපතිවරයා රටේ දෙපාර්තමේන්තු, අමාත්‍යාංශ හා සෙසු රාජ්‍ය ආයතන තන්ත‍්‍රය කොන්කර දැමීමේ හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයක්ම විසඳන එකම ජගතා හා තීරකයා තමා පමණක් යන හැඟීම සමාජගත කරමින්. එය රාජ්‍ය පරිපාලනයට ඉතා අහිතකරයි.

විශේෂයෙන්ම 19 වන සංශෝධනයෙන් පසුව බලාත්මක කරන ලද ස්වාධීන කොමිසන් සභා ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වන පසුබිමෙක යළිත් අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස ජනපති-කේන්ද්‍රීය මහජන පැමිණිලි හා දුක් ගැනවිලි සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් ගොඩනැගීමට ඉඩ නොතැබිය යුතුයි.

එසේම රටවැසියන්ටත් මෙහි වගකීමක් තිබෙනවා. පත්වීම්, උසස්වීම්, වැටුප් වර්ධක, මාරුවීම්, විභාග ප‍්‍රතිඵල, පරිපාලන අක‍්‍රමිකතා ආදී බොහෝ කරුණු අරභයා නොවිසඳුණු ගැටලූ ඇති බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් මේ බොහොමයකට අදාළ පැමිණිලි හා පරීක්ෂණ ක‍්‍රමවේදයන් ඉමහත් මහජන මුදලකින් පවත්වා ගෙන යන බවත් අප දන්නවා. පවතින ක‍්‍රමවේදයන්ට යොමු නොවී හැම ප‍්‍රශ්නයම ජනපතිට කියන්න යාම ඔහුගේත්, රටේත් කාලය හා සම්පත් අපතේ යැවීමක්.

මේ අතර ජනපති නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන දක්වන ආකල්ප ගැනද යමක් කිව යුතුයි.

දෙසැම්බර් 27 වනදා අම්පාරේ රැස්වීමක් අමතමින් ජනපති සිරිසේන කළ සුචරිතවාදී කතාව සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල මහත් ආන්දෝලනයක් ඇති කළා. එන්රිකේ ගායකයාගේ දෙසැම්බර් 20 කොළඹ ප‍්‍රසංගයේ යම් පේ‍්‍රක්ෂක හැසිරීම් ගැන ජනපතිවරයා නොසතුට පළ කළ අතර එසේ කිරිමට ඔහුට පූර්ණ භාෂණ නිදහස තිබෙනවා. තමා කැමති මතයක් දැරීමට අන් සියලූ රටවැසියන්ට ඇති නිදහස එපමණින්ම ඔහුට ද තිබෙනවා.

එමෙන්ම රටේ නායකයා සමග ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ එකඟ නොවීමට හා ඔහු තරයේ විවේචනය කිරීමට ඒ හා සමාන අයිතියක් රටවැසියන් වන අප සතුයි. ජනපතිගේ මඩුවලිග කතාවට මාත් ඇතුළු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන බොහෝ දෙනෙකු විරෝධය දැක්වූවා.

‘අපේකම’ යන්න පටු ලෙසින් විග‍්‍රහ කිරීම ගැන මෙන්ම පුරාණ ලංකාවේ යොදා ගැනුණු, ශිෂ්ට සමාජයකට තව දුරටත් නොගැළපෙන ම්ලේච්ඡ දඬුවමක් (අඩු තරමින් කට වචනයෙන් හෝ) නිර්දේශ කිරීම ද අපේ විවේචනවලට හේතු වුණා.

President Sirisena of Sri Lanka lashes out at online critics claiming a plot to destroy him - Lankadeepa, 30 December 2015

President Sirisena of Sri Lanka lashes out at online critics claiming a plot to destroy him – Lankadeepa, 30 December 2015

මගේ වැටහීමට අනුව සංවාදය එතැනින් හමාර විය හැකිව තිබුණා. එහෙත් ලංකාදීප වාර්තාවකට අනුව දෙසැම්බර් 29 වනදා බත්තරමුල්ලේ කතාවක් කළ ජනාධිපතිවරයා නිවී යමින් තිබූ ප‍්‍රතිවිරෝධයට ඉන්දන එකතු කළා. වෙබ් අඩවි හෝ ෆේස්බුක් ඔස්සේ තමා ‘පොඩි පට්ටම් කිරීමට, අඹරා දැමීමට සහ නැති කිරීමට’ සමහරුන් කටයුතු කරන බවට චෝදනා කළා.

තමා වට කොට (වාචිකව) පහරදීමේ සංවිධානාත්මක ප‍්‍රයත්නයක් ඇතැයි යන උපකල්පනය මත රටේ නායකයා සැකමුසු මානසිකත්වයක් ගොඩ නගා ගනී නම් එය ඔහුටත්, රටටත් අහිතකරයි. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ දේශපාලන ප‍්‍රතිවාදීන් ද සිටිය හැකි නමුත් මා දන්නා තරමට එබඳු සංවිධානාත්මක ප‍්‍රයත්නයක් නැහැ.

එහෙත් එක් පැහැදිලි සත්යයක් තිබෙනවාග සමාජ මාධ් විශේෂයෙනුත්, වෙබ් අවකාශය පොදුවේත් ගරුසරු නොකරන තැනක්. අධිපතිවාදයන්ට හා උද්දච්චකමට නොකැමැති පිරිස එහි වැඩියි.

උදාහරණයකට වෙනත් මාධ්‍යවල තවමත් යෙදෙන තුමා හා තුමිය ආදිය එහි අදාළ නැහැ. හොඳ දෙයට සයිබර් අත්පොළසන් නාදයත් (එනම් දිගින් දිගටම ෂෙයාර් වීම් සහ ලයික් වීම) මෙන්ම අධිපතිවාදී හෝ පණ්ඩිත කථාවලට සයිබර් හූවත් මතුව එනවා. මඩුවලිග කථාවට ලැබුණේ දෙවැන්නයිග

හිමිකරුවන් නැති, කතුවරුන් නැති සමාජ මාධ්‍ය (වෙනත් මාධ්‍ය මෙන්) රාජ්‍ය බලය යොදා මෙල්ල කරන්නට බැහැ. හැකි එකම දෙය සීරුවෙන්, සුහදව හා සහයෝගීතාවෙන් එහි ගැවසෙන පිරිස සමග ගනුදෙනු කිරීමයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල ද උදව්වෙන් තනතුරට ආ සිරිසේන ජනාධිපතිවරයාට ඒ හරහා රටවැසියන් සමග හරවත් හා මිත‍්‍රශීලී සංවාදයකට යාමට තවමත් ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. දෙවැනි වසරේවත් ඔහු එය කරනු ඇතැයි අපි පතමු!

මාධ්‍යය කුමක් වුවත් රටවැසි අපට සවන් දෙනල අප සමග සුහදව කථා කරන හා අපට බණ නොකියන නූතන නායකයකු ඕනෑ!

See also:

4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

18 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #203: මෛත‍්‍රීගේ මැන්ඩෙලා මොහොත!

15 January 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #160: දේශපාලන සන්නිවේදනයෙ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාධකය

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #252: ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදයේ ඩිජිටල් මුහුණුවර හා ජනවාරි 8 පෙරළියේ ඉතිරි අභියෝග

"For only the second time in my life, I voted for a winning candidate on 8 Jan 2015. I now keep insisting that be delivers on his promises." - Nalaka Gunwardene

“For only the second time in my life, I voted for a winning candidate on 8 Jan 2015. I now keep insisting that Maithripala Sirisena delivers on his promises.” – Nalaka Gunwardene, blogger and tweep

At Sri Lanka’s seventh presidential election, held on 8 January 2015, we citizens sent the despotic Rajapaksa regime home. Contrary to some assertions, it was an entirely a home-grown, non-violent and democratic process. An impressive 81.52% of registered voters (or 12.26 million persons) took part in choosing our next head of state and head of government: Maithripala Sirisena.

It was also Sri Lanka’s first national level election where smartphones and social media played a key role and probably made a difference in the outcome. During the weeks running up to 8 January, hundreds of thousands of Lankans from all walks of life used social media to vent their frustrations, lampoon politicians, demand clarity on election manifestos, or simply share hopes for a better future.

As I documented shortly afterwards, most of us were not supporting any political party or candidate. We were just fed up with nearly a decade of mega-corruption, nepotism and malgovernance. Our scattered and disjointed protests – both online and offline – added up to just enough momentum to defeat the strongman Mahinda Rajapaksa. Just weeks earlier, he had appeared totally invincible.

Thus began the era of yaha-palanaya or good governance.

In real life, democracy is a work in progress and good governance, an arduous journey. In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 10 January 2016), I argue that voting in two key elections during 2015 (including Parliamtnary Election held on 17 August) was the easy part. We citizens now have to be vigilant and stay engaged with the government to ensure that our politicians actually walk their talk.

Here, we can strategically use social media among other advocacy methods and tools.

See my English essay which covers similar ground: Yahapalanaya at One: When will our leaders ‘walk the talk’? Groundviews.org, 4 January 2016

මීට වසරකට පෙර තීරණාත්මක මැතිවරණයක් අබිමුඛ්හාව නාලක ගුණවර්ධන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා බෙදාගත් 2015 අවුරුදු පැතුම

මීට වසරකට පෙර තීරණාත්මක මැතිවරණයක් අබිමුඛ්හාව නාලක ගුණවර්ධන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා බෙදාගත් 2015 අවුරුදු පැතුම

ජනාධිපතිවරණයට දින කීපයකට පෙර 2015 ජනවාරි 1 වනදා මගේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගිණුම් හරහා එළැඹෙන වසරට මගේ පැතුම රූප-වචන මිශි‍්‍රත මීම් (meme) එකක ස්වරූපයෙන් මුදා හැරියා. එහි කියැවුණේ 2015 මගේ පැතුම: යටත් වැසියකු නොවන නිදහස් පුරවැසියෙක්!

2015 ජනවාරි 8 වනදා උදෙන්ම ගොස් මා ඡන්දය දුන්නේ මෛතී‍්‍රපාල සිරිසේන නම් මැතිවරණ අපේක්ෂකයාට නොවෙයි. ඔහු සංකේතවත් කළ පරමාදර්ශී යහපාලන සංකල්පයටයි. දේශපාලනයේදී පුද්ගලයින්ට වඩා සංකල්ප වටිනා බව කලක් ගත වී හෝ මා තේරුම් ගෙන සිටිනවා.

යහපාලනයේ ජයග‍්‍රහණයෙන් මා ප‍්‍රමෝදයට පත් වූයේ කිසිදා සිරිසේනගේ හෝ වෙනත් කිසිදු දේශපාලන පක්ෂයක හෝ හිතවතකු නොවූ ස්වාධීන පුරවැසියකු හැටියටයි.

ජනවාරි 9 වන දා සිට සාපේක්ෂව වඩා නිදහස් හා මානව හිමිකම් ගරු කරන වාතාවරණයක ජීවත්වීමේ අවකාශය ලක්වැසියන්ට උදා වූ බව කිව යුතුයි. බියෙන් තොරව රටේ නායකයා හා සෙසු පාලක පිරිස නිර්දය ලෙස විවේචනය කිරීමේ හැකියාව 2015 වසර පුරා මා රායෝගිකව අත්හදා බැලුවා. රටේ නායකයා යහපත් දෙයක් කළ විට එය පසසන්නත්, වැරදි දෙයක් කළ විට එය විවේචනය කරන්නත් හැකි පසුබිමක් යළි උදා වීම ලොකු දෙයක්.

එහෙත් අප හමුවේ තවමත් අභියෝග රැසක් ඉතිරිව තිබෙනවා.

එයින් එකක් නම් ජනවාරි 8 මැතිවරණ ප්‍රතිඵලය පිළිගන්නට සමහරුන් නොකැමැති වීමයි. ඒ ගැන විවිධ කුමන්ත්‍රණ තර්ක මතු වනවා. විපක්ෂයේ පොදු අපේක්ෂක මෛතී‍්‍රපාල සිරිසේනගේ ජයග‍්‍රහණය පිටුපස අදිසි හස්තයක් නැතහොත් ජාත්‍යන්තර බලපෑමක් කි‍්‍රයාත්මක වූවා ද? එය මෙරට අභ්‍යන්තර කටයුතුවලට ඇඟිලි ගැසීමේ මහා “ජාත්‍යන්තර කුමන්ත‍්‍රණයක” කොටසක්ද? මෙවන් ප‍්‍රශ්න වසරක් ගත වීත් තවමත් සමහරුන්ගේ මනසේ සැරිසරන බව පෙනෙනවා.

මෙය විග්‍රහ කරන්න මා එක්තරා උපමිතියක් යොදා ගන්නට කැමතියි.

අනුරාධපුරයේ හා පොළොන්නරුවේ හමු වන මහා දාගැබ් පුරාණ ලෝකයේ දැවැන්ත ඉදිකිරීම් අතරට ගැනෙනවා. ඒවායේ වාස්තු විද්‍යාත්මක හා ඉංජිනේරුමය නිමාව අපේ පැරැන්නන්ගේ විද්‍යා හා තාක්ෂණය හැකියාවන්ට මනා උදාහරණයි.

අනුරාධපුරයේ පිහිටි මිරිසවැටිය, රුවන්වැලි සෑය හා ජේතවනය යන මහා දාගැබ් තුන දිශා පිහිටුවීමේදී හා ඉදි කිරීමේදී පිටසක්වල බුද්ධිමත් ජීවීන්ගේ සහාය ලැබී ඇතැයි 1997දී ලාංකිකයකු ලියූ පොතකින් අසාමාන්‍ය තර්කයක් මතු කරනු ලැබුවා (Alien Mysteries in Sri Lanka & Egypt, by Mihindukulasuriya Susantha Fernando, 1997). ඊජිප්තුවේ මහා පිරමීඩ හා අපේ මහා දාගැබ් සසඳමින් ලියා ඇති මේ පොත විද්‍යාත්මක සාධක හා තර්කවලට වඩා පරිකල්පනය හා විශ්වාස මත පදනම් වූවක්.

එම පොත ගැන මගේ ප්‍රතිචාරය වූයේ මෙයයි. “ඕනෑම ඓතිහාසික හෝ කාලීන හෝ කරුණක් ගැන තමන් රිසි ලෙසින් ප‍්‍රතිවිග‍්‍රහ කිරීමේ අයිතිය විවෘත සමාජයක තිබිය යුතුයි. එසේම එවන් විග‍්‍රහයන් සංවාදයට ලක් විය යුතුයි. එසේ නමුත් අපේ මහා දාගැබ් තැනීමට පිටසක්වල ජීවීන්ගේ සහාය ලැබුණා යන කල්පිතයේ යටි අරුත එවැනි හපන්කම් අපේ ඇත්තන්ට තනිවම කළ නොහැකි වූ බවද?”

ඈත හෝ මෑත ඉතිහාසය ගැන ෆැන්ටසි ආකාරයේ කල්පිත හෝ කුමන්ත‍්‍රණ කථා මතු කරන විට බෙහෙවින් ප‍්‍රවේශම් විය යුතු බවට මෙය හොඳ උදාහරණයක්.

2015 ජනවරි 8 වනදා සිදු වූ දේශපාලන බල සංක‍්‍රාන්තිය ගැන පරාජිතයන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ අනුගාමිකයන් මතු කරන විග‍්‍රහයන් අභව්‍යයි.

එදා මෙරට සිදු වූයේ මෑත ඉතිහාසයේ සාපේක්ෂව වඩා සාමකාමී මැතිවරණය හරහා ඡන්දදායකයන් විසින් නව ජනාධිපතිවරයකු තෝරා ගැනීමයි. ලියාපදිංචි ඡන්දදායකයන්ගෙන් 81.52%ක් (එනම් 12,264,377ක්) ඡන්දය ප‍්‍රකාශ කළා. නිදහස් හා සාධාරණ මැතිවරණයක් පැවැත්වීමට මැතිවරණ කොමසාරිස්වරයා හා කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය වග බලා ගත්තා.

මැතිවරණ කැම්පේන් කාලය තුළ බලයේ සිටි ජනාධිපතිවරයාගේ වාසියට රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය හා රාජ්‍ය සම්පත් අනිසි ලෙස යොදා ගත් නමුත් අවසානයේදී තීරකයන් වූයේ ඡන්දදායක අපියි. වැඩි ඡන්ද 449,072කින් විපක්ෂයේ පොදු අපේක්ෂකයා ජය ගත්තේ ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ සැබෑ කි‍්‍රයාකාරීත්වය සංකේතවත් කරමින්.

අපේ මැතිවරණ නිලධාරීන් මහත් ආයාසයෙන් පැවැත් වූ මැතිවරණයකින් අපේ ඡන්දදායකයන් බහුතරයකගේ රහසිතගව රකාශ ඡන්දවල සමුච්චිත රතිඵලය ලෙස සාමකාමී බල සංකරාන්තියක් සිදු කිරීමේ සම්පූර්ණ ගෞරවය හිමි වන්නේ අපටමයි.

එය රටින පිටත සිටින කුමන හෝ බලවේගයකට පැවරීමට තැත් කිරීම අපේ ඡන්දදායකයින්ට, මැතිවරණ යාන්ත‍්‍රණයට හා සමස්ත ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයට කරන නිග‍්‍රහයක්. පටු අරමුණු තකා උඩ බලාගෙන කෙළ ගැසීමක්.

මැතිවරණයේ ප‍්‍රතිඵලය ගැන සමහරුන් ප‍්‍රමෝදයට පත්වූ අතර, තවත් සමහරුන් කණගාටුවට පත් වූවා. එය ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ ස්වභාවයයි. අපේ පෞද්ගලික රුචි අරුචිකම් කුමක් වුවත් එම කි‍්‍රයාදාමය හා ප‍්‍රතිඵලය අවතක්සේරු කිරීම හෝ ගැරහීමට ලක් කිරීම අනුවණකාරී වැඩක්.

ජනාධිපතිවරණයට පසුදා නාලක ගුණවර්ධන කඩිමුඩියේ නිමවා සමාජමාධ්‍යවලට මුදා හැරි මීමය - සිය ගණනින් ෂෙයාර් කරන ලදී

ජනාධිපතිවරණයට පසුදා නාලක ගුණවර්ධන කඩිමුඩියේ නිමවා සමාජමාධ්‍යවලට මුදා හැරි මීමය – සිය ගණනින් ෂෙයාර් කරන ලදී

 

ජයග‍්‍රාහකයාගේ වැඩි ඡන්ද 449,072ට දායක වූ සාධක ගැන ද විවාදයක් තිබෙනවා.

රාජපක්ෂ පාලනය යටතේ පැවති දශකයක පමණ කාලය තුළ රටේ සිදු වූ ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ ගරා වැටීම ගැන කලකිරීමට පත් සිංහල මධ්‍යම පාන්තිකයක්ගෙන් කොටසක් වෙනසක් සඳහා ඡන්දය ප‍්‍රකාශ කළ බව එක් මතයක්. මාන්නාධික පාලකයකුගේ යටත් වැසියන් ලෙස නොව නිවහල් පුරවැසියන් ලෙස යළිත් විසීමට අපට ඕනෑ වුණා.

එසේම පසුගිය පාලන සමයේ නිතර අවමානයට හා වෙනස්කම්වලට ලක් වූ සුළුජාතීන් හා ආගමික සුළුතරයන් අතර සමහරෙක් ද පැවති පාලනය වෙනස් කිරීමට ඡන්දය දුන්නා යයි අනුමාන කළ හැකියි.

මෙයට අමතරව එතරම් අවධානයට ලක් නොවූ සාධකයක් මා දකිනවා. ජනවාරි 8 වනදා ජනාධිපතිවරණයට ලියාපදිංචි ඡන්දදායකයන් 15,044,490ක් සිටියා. මේ අතර මෑතදී වයස 18 පසු කිරීම නිසා ජීවිතයේ මුල් වතාවට ඡන්දය දැමීමේ වරම ලද තරුණ තරුණියන් මිලියනයක් පමණ ද සිටියා.

මේ පිරිසේ බොහෝ දෙනෙකු ජංගම දුරකථන භාවිත කරන, ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හරහා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සම්බන්ද වන අයයි. (ඉන්ටර්නෙට් තව දුරටත් ටික දෙනෙකුට සීමා වූ නාගරික වරප‍්‍රසාදයක් නොවෙයි.) ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල (විශේෂයෙන් ම ෆේස්බුක්, ට්විටර් හා යූටියුබ්) හරහා මැතිවරණ සමයේ බොහෝ නොනිල තොරතුරු ගලා ගියා. සංවාද සිදු කෙරුණා.

මේ හරහා තරුණ ඡන්දවලට යම් බලපෑමක් සිදු කරන්නට ඇතැයි මා සිතනවා. මෙය ආසියානු කලාපයේ වෙනත් රටවල සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හා මැතිවරණ කි‍්‍රයාදාමයන්ට සමකළ හැකියි.

ජනවාරි 8 වනදා සිදුවූ සාමකාමී හා ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී ආණ්ඩු පෙරළියට වෙබ්ගත සමාජ මාධ්‍යයද සැළකිය යුතු මට්ටමින් දායක වූ බව ජනාධිපති වීමෙන් ටික දිනකට පසු මෛතී‍්‍රපාල සිරිසේන කියා සිටියා. ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන කි‍්‍රයාදාමයන් ගැන කළ විග‍්‍රහයකදී මා එයට හේතු වූ සාධක විස්තරාත්මකව සාකච්ඡා කළා. [කියවන්න: Was #PresPollSL 2015 Sri Lanka’s first Cyber Election? By Nalaka Gunawardene. Groundviews.org, 13 January 2015].

සැකෙවින් කිව හොත් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය හරහා මුදල් ගෙවා හෝ මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රචාරණය කිරීමට විපක්ෂයේ පොදු අපේක්ෂකයාට තිබුණේ සීමිත සම්පත් හා හැකියාවක්. බලයේ සිටි නායකයාට මෙන් ව්‍යාපාරික අනුග‍්‍රහය ලැබීමට හෝ රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය අයථා ලෙස භාවිතයට හෝ හැකි වූයේ නැහැ.

මේ පසුබිම තුළ සිරිසේනගේ යහපාලන මැතිවරණ පණිවුඩ සමාජගත කිරීමට ප‍්‍රබලව දායක වූයේ (නිල මැතිවරණ ව්‍යාපාරයට කිසිසේත් සම්බන්ධ නොවූ) ස්වේච්ඡාවෙන් පෙරට ආ ඩිජිටල් හැකියාවන් තිබූ නිර්මාණශීලී තරුණ තරුණියන් පිරිසක්.

ඔවුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට හා වෙනත් වෙබ් අඩවිවලට මුදා හැරි කෙටි පණිඩුව, හාස්‍යජනක රූපමය පණිවුඩ (මීම්) හා වෙනත් අන්තර්ගතයන් ඉක්මණින් වෙබ් භාවිත කරන්නන් අතර සංසරණය වුණා. එතැනින් නොනැවතී සෙසු ජන සමාජයට ද කාන්දු වී පැතිරුණා.

මේ මගේ නිරීක්ෂණ පමණක් නොවෙයි. එය ගැන අවධානයෙන් සිටි තවත් අයගේ ද පිළිගැනීමයි. මට අමතරව රංග කලන්සූරිය හා අජිත් පැරකුම් ජයසිංහ වැන්නවුන් ද මේ සයිබර් සාධකය තහවුරු කරමින් ගෙවී ගිය වසරේ ලියා තිබෙනවා.

ජනවාරි 8 වනදා බහුතරයක් ලක්වැසි ඡන්දදායකයින් විසින් විවර කර ගත් යහපාලන අවකාශය, අගෝස්තු 17 වනදා පාර්ලිමේන්තු මැතිවරණයේදී යළිත් තහවුරු කරනු ලැබුවා.

එහෙත් පුරවැසි අපේ වගකීම එතැනින් හමාර වී නැහැ. යහපාලනය අයාලේ යන්නට, බඩගෝස්තරවාදයට නතු වන්නට බොහෝ ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. මේ අවදානම අවම කර ගත හැක්කේ අප දිගටම ආණ්ඩුකරණ කි‍්‍රයාදාමයේ සකි‍්‍රය කොටස්කරුවන් ලෙස සිටිය හොත් පමණයි.

කියන කොට එහෙමයි කරන කොට මෙහෙමයි! යහපාලනයේ කයිය හා කෙරුවාව අතර මහා හිදැසක්!

කියන කොට එහෙමයි, කරන කොට මෙහෙමයි! යහපාලනයේ කයිය හා කෙරුවාව අතර මහා හිදැසක්!

මැතිවරණ අතරතුර කාලයේ දේශපාලනය හා ආණ්ඩුකරණය (politics and governance) එම කාර්යයේ පූර්ණකාලීනව නිරතවන දේශපාලකයන් පිරිසකට පවරා අපේ වැඩක් බලාගෙන ඔහේ ඉන්නට ඉඩක් අපට නැහැ. දශක ගණනක් එසේ කිරීමේ බරපතල විපාක අප දැන් අත් විඳිනවා.

තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණයෙන් ජවය ලබන හා ඒකරාශී වන තරුණ පුරවැසියන් තව දුරටත් පාලකයන්ට රිසි පරිදි “අමන පාලනයක්” ගෙන යාමට ඉඩ නොදෙනු ඇති. බොහෝ ගතානුගතික දේශපාලකයන් නව සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන්ට හා සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට බිය වන්නේ ද මේ නිසායි! මෙතෙක් කල් කළ සටකපටකම් දිගටම කිරීම අසීරු වන බැවින්.

25 August 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #233: ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය නවීකරණය කරන සමාජයීය වගවීම

අඩ සියවසකට වැඩි කාලයක් (1956 – 2008) ශී‍්‍ර ලංකාවේ පදිංචිව සිටි, විද්‍යා ලේඛක හා අනාගතවේදී ශී‍්‍රමත් ආතර් සී ක්ලාක්ගේ අදහස් කිහිපයක් සිහිපත් කිරීම වැදගත්.

ඔහු අවසන් වරට මෙරට ප‍්‍රකාශනයක් සමග දීර්ඝ සම්මුඛ සාකච්ඡාවක් කළේ 2005 මුලදී. සුනාමියෙන් සති කිහිපයකට පසු LMD ව්‍යාපාරික සඟරාව සමග කළ ඒ සංවාදය අතරතුර මෙරටට උචිත ආණ්ඩුකරණයක් ගැනත් කථා කළා.

රටේ අවශ්‍යතාවලට ගැළපෙන හොඳම පාලන ක‍්‍රමය කුමක්දැයි ඔහුගෙන් ඇසූ විට දුන් පිළිතුර මෙයයි.

රජාතන්තරවාදය හොඳයි හා නරකයි යන තර්ක දෙකම අපට නිතර අසන්නට ලැබෙනවා. රජාතන්තරවාදය පරිපූර්ණ නැහැ. එය යාවත්කාලීන කිරීම හා රටේ හැටියට යම් තරමකට හැඩගස්වා ගැනීම අවශ්යයි. එසේම සියවස් ගණනක් පැවත රජාතාන්තිරක සම්ප්‍රදායන් නූතන තාක්ෂණයන්ගේ පිහිටෙන් වඩාත් දියුණු තියුණු කළ හැකියි.

 “සීඝරයෙන් ගෝලීයකරණය වන අපේ ලෝකයේ දුගී බව පිටු දැකීමට හා සියලූ ජනයාගේ ජීවන මට්ටම් නඟා සිටුවීමට නම් රාජ් තන්තරයේ නිසි වගකීම සහ වගවීම අවශ්යයි. එය මධ්යම, පළාත් හා පළාත් පාලන යන සියලූ මට්ටම්වල සිදුවිය යුතුයි.

 “මෙය සාක්ෂාත් කර ගත හැක්කේ පුරවැසියන් මැතිවරණවල ඡන්දය දීමෙන් හා කලින් කලට ආණ්ඩු මාරු කිරීමෙන් නොනැවතී දිගටම රජයන් හා ජනතා නියෝජිතයන් සමග ගණුදෙනුවක යෙදීමෙන්. මෙයට සමාජයීය වගවීම (social accountability) යයි කියනවා.

 “තොරතුරු හා සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් ශූර ලෙස යොදා ගනිමින්. දත්ත හා සාක්ෂි මත පදනම් වී ආණ්ඩුකරණය විචාරයට ලක් කිරීමට අද පුරවැසියන්ට හැකියාව තිබෙනවා. මීට පෙර පරම්පරාවල ආවේගශීලීව හෝ හුදු දේශපාලන මතවාද මත පමණක් උද්ඝෝෂණ කළ පුරවැසියන්ට දැන් ඊට වඩා හරවත්ව හා ඉලක්කගතව රාජ් තන්තරය විවේචනය කළ හැකියි.

 “මහජන මුදල් භාවිතය, රාජ් ආයතනවල අකාර්යක්ෂමතා, දූෂණ, වංචා හා බොරු ප්රෝඩා ගැන සූක්ෂම ලෙස ගවේෂණය කිරීමට හා තමා සොයා ගන්නා දේ ඉක්මණින් වෙබ් ගත කිරීමට අද ඩිජිටල් තාක්ෂණයෙන් සන්නද්ධ වූ පුරවැසියන්ට හැකියි. මේ නව හැකියාවන් හරහා යහපත් ආණ්ඩුකරණයට සියලූ දේශපාලකයන්ට හා රාජ් නිලධාරීන්ට බල කිරීමේ විභවය ජනතාවට ලැබෙනවා. මේ බලය නිසි ලෙස භාවිත කිරීමට අප උත්සුක විය යුතුයි.

Arthur C Clarke's remarks on ICTs and good governance, made in 2005

Arthur C Clarke’s remarks on ICTs and good governance, made in 2005

2008 මාර්තුවේ අප අතරින් නික්ම යන තුරුම ක්ලාක් නිතර කීවේ මේ නව සියවසේ ප‍්‍රබලම අවිය හා වටිනාම ඉන්ධනය වන්නේ තොරතුරු හා දැනුම බවයි. (තොරතුරුවලට සමාජයීය අගයක් එකතු කළ විට එය දැනුම බවට පත් වනවා.)

See also:
4 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #201: ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ අරාබි වසන්තයක් හට ගත හැකිද?

11 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #202: 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

18 January 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #203: මෛත‍්‍රීගේ මැන්ඩෙලා මොහොත!

 

Echelon June 2015 column: Sri Lanka – Unclear on Nuclear

Text of my column written for Echelon monthly business magazine, Sri Lanka, June 2015 issue

Sri Lanka: Unclear on Nuclear

 By Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena meets Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, 16 Feb 2015

Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena meets Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, 16 Feb 2015

Should Sri Lanka consider nuclear energy for its medium to meet its long term electricity generation needs?

This has been debated for years in scientific and policy circles. It has come into sharp focus again after Sri Lanka signed a bilateral agreement with India “to cooperate in peaceful uses of nuclear energy”.

Under the agreement, signed in New Delhi on 16 February 2015 during President Maithripala Sirisena’s first overseas visit, India will help Sri Lanka build its nuclear energy infrastructure, upgrade existing nuclear technologies and train specialised staff. The two countries will also collaborate in producing and using radioactive isotopes.

On the same day, a story filed from the Indian capital by the Reuters news agency said, “India could also sell light small-scale nuclear reactors to Sri Lanka which wants to establish 600 megawatts of nuclear capacity by 2030”.

This was neither confirmed nor denied by officials. The full text has not been made public, but a summary appeared on the website of Sri Lanka’s Atomic Energy Board. In it, AEB reassured the public that the deal does not allow India to “unload any radioactive wastes” in Sri Lanka, and that all joint activities will comply with standards and guidelines set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a UN body in which both governments are members.

According to AEB, Sri Lanka has also signed a memorandum of understanding on nuclear cooperation with Russia, while another is being worked out with Pakistan.

Beyond such generalities, no specific plans have been disclosed. We need more clarity, transparency and adequate public debate on such a vital issue with many economic, health and environmental implications. Yaha-paalanaya (good governance) demands nothing less.

Radiation_sign_cropped

 South Asia’s nuclear plans

The South Asian precedent is not encouraging. Our neighbouring countries with more advanced in nuclear programmes have long practised a high level of opacity and secrecy.

Two countries — India and Pakistan – already have functional nuclear power plants, which generate around 4% of electricity in each country. Both have ambitious expansion plans involving global leaders in the field like China, France, Russia and the United States. Bangladesh will soon join the nuclear club: it is building two Russian-supplied nuclear power reactors, the first of which will be operational by 2020.

India and Pakistan also possess home-built nuclear weapons, and have refused to sign the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Specifics of their arsenals remain unknown.

Both countries have historically treated their civilian and military nuclear establishments as ‘sacred cows’ beyond any public scrutiny. India’s Official Secrets Act of 1923 covers its nuclear energy programme which cannot be questioned by the public or media. Even senior Parliamentarians complain about the lack of specific information.

It is the same, if not worse, in Pakistan. Pakistani nuclear physicist Dr Pervez Hoodbhoy, an analyst on science and security, finds this unacceptable. “Our nuclear power programme is opaque since it was earlier connected to the weapons programme. Under secrecy, citizens have much essential information hidden from them both in terms of safety and costs.”

Safety of nuclear energy dominates the agenda more than four years after Japan’s Fukushima nuclear accident of March 2011. The memories of Chernobyl (April 1986) still linger. These concerns were flagged in a recent online debate on South Asia’s critical nuclear issues that I moderated for SciDev.Net. With five panellists drawn from across the opinion spectrum, the debate highlighted just how polarised positions are when it comes to anything nuclear in our part of the world.

Nuclear debate promo

Nuclear debate promo

Bottomline

The bottomline: all South Asian countries need more electricity as their economies grow. Evidence suggests that increasing electricity consumption per capita enhance socio-economic development.

The World Bank says South Asia has around 500 million people living without electricity (most of them in India). Many who are connected to national grids have partial and uneven supply due to frequent power outages or scheduled power cuts.

The challenge is how to generate sufficient electricity, and fast enough, without high costs or high risks? What is the optimum mix of options: should nuclear be considered alongside hydro, thermal, solar and other sources?

In 2013, Sri Lanka’s total installed electricity generation capacity in the grid was 3,290 MegaWatts (MW). The system generated a total electricity volume of 12,019.6 GigWatt-hours (GWh) that year. The relative proportions contributed by hydro, thermal and new renewable energies (wind, solar and biomass) vary from year to year. (Details at: http://www.info.energy.gov.lk/)

In a year of good rainfall, (such as 2013), half of the electricity can still come from hydro – the cheapest kind to generate. But rainfall is unpredictable, and in any case, our hydro potential is almost fully tapped. For some years now, it is imported oil and coal that account for a lion’s share of our electricity. Their costs depend on international market prices and the USD/LKR exchange rate.

Image courtesy Ministry of Power and Energy, Sri Lanka, website

Image courtesy Ministry of Power and Energy, Sri Lanka, website

Should Sri Lanka phase in nuclear power at some point in the next two decades to meet demand that keeps rising with lifestyles and aspirations? Much more debate is needed before such a decision.

Nuclear isn’t a panacea. In 2003, a study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the future of nuclear power traced the “limited prospects for nuclear power” to four unresolved problems, i.e. costs, safety, waste and proliferation (http://web.mit.edu/nuclearpower/).

A dozen years on, the nuclear industry is in slow decline in most parts of the world says Dr M V Ramana, a physicist with the Program on Science and Global Security at Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. “In 1996, nuclear power contributed about 17.6% to the world’s electricity. By 2013, it was been reduced to a little over 10%. A large factor in this decline has been the fact that it was unable to compete economically with other sources of power generation.”

Safety issues

Beyond capital and recurrent cost considerations, issues of public safety and operator liability dominate the nuclear debate.

Take, for example, Pakistan’s recent decision to install two Chinese-supplied 1,100 MW reactors near Karachi, a megacity that packs almost Sri Lanka’s population. When concerned citizens challenged this in court, the government pleaded “national security was at stake” and so the public could not be involved in the process.

Dr Hoodbhoy is unconvinced, and cautions that his country is treading on very dangerous ground. He worries about what can go wrong – including reactor design problems, terrorist attacks, and the poor safety culture in South Asia that can lead to operator error.

He says: “The reactors to be built in Karachi are a Chinese design that has not yet been built or tested anywhere, not even in China. They are to be sited in a city of 20 million which is also the world’s fastest growing and most chaotic megalopolis. Evacuating Karachi in the event of a Fukushima or Chernobyl-like disaster is inconceivable!”

Princeton’s Dr Ramana, who has researched about opacity of India’s nuclear programmes, found similar aloofness. “The claim about national security is a way to close off democratic debate rather than a serious expression of some concern. It should be the responsibility of authorities to explain exactly in what way national security is affected.”

See also: India’s Nuclear Enclave and Practice of Secrecy. By M V Ramana. Chapter in ‘South Asian Cultures of the Bomb’ (Itty Abraham, ed., Indiana University Press, 2009)

Construction of the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant in Tamil Nadu

Construction of the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant in Tamil Nadu

 Nuclear Dilemmas

Putting the nuclear ‘genie’ back in the bottle may not be realistic. The World Nuclear Association, an industry network, says there were 435 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 31 countries by end 2014. Another 70 are under construction.

Following Fukushima, public apprehensions on the safety of nuclear power plants have been heightened. Governments – at least in democracies – need to be sensitive to public protests while seeking to ensure long term energy security.

By end 2014, India had 21 nuclear reactors in operation in 7 nuclear power plants, with a total installed capacity of 5,780 MW. Plans to build more have elicited sustained protests from local residents in proposed sites, as well as from national level advocacy groups.

For example, the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant in Tamil Nadu, southern India — which started supplying to the national power grid in mid 2013 — has drawn protests for several years. Local people are worried about radiation safety in the event of an accident – a concern shared by Sri Lanka, which at its closest (Kalpitiya) is only 225 km away.

India’s Nuclear Liability Law of 2010 covers both domestic and trans-boundary concerns. But the anti-nuclear groups are sceptical. Praful Bidwai, one of India’s leading anti-nuclear activists, says the protests have tested his country’s democracy. He has been vocal about the violent police response to protestors.

Nuclear Power Plants in India - official map 2014

Nuclear Power Plants in India – official map 2014

Meanwhile, advocates of a non-nuclear future for the region say future energy needs can be met by advances in solar and wind technologies as well as improved storage systems (batteries). India is active on this front as well: it wants to develop a solar capacity of 100,000 MW by 2022.

India’s thrust in renewables does not affect its nuclear plans. However, even pro-nuclear experts recognise the need for better governance. Dr R Rajaraman, an emeritus professor of physics at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, wants India to retain the nuclear option — but with more transparency and accountability.

He said during our online debate: “We do need energy in India from every possible source. Nuclear energy, from all that I know, is one good source. Safety considerations are vital — but not enough to throw the baby out with the bathwater.”

Rajaraman argued that nuclear energy’s dangers need to be compared with the hazards faced by those without electricity – a development dilemma. He also urged for debate between those who promote and oppose nuclear energy, which is currently lacking.

Any discussion on nuclear energy is bound to generate more heat than light. Yet openness and evidence based discussion are essential for South Asian countries to decide whether and how nuclear power should figure in their energy mix.

In this, Sri Lanka must do better than its neighbours.

Full online debate archived at: http://www.scidev.net/south-asia/nuclear/multimedia/live-debate-unclear-on-nuclear.html

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene is on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com.