[op-ed] Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

First published in International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) South Asia blog on 3 March 2017.

Sri Lanka’s RTI Law: Will the Government ‘Walk the Talk’?

by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka's Right to Information (RTI) law - by Nalaka Gunawardene

Taking stock of the first month of implementation of Sri Lanka’s Right to Information (RTI) law – by Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka’s new Right to Information (RTI) Law, adopted through a rare Parliamentary consensus in June 2016, became fully operational on 3 February 2017.

From that day, the island nation’s 21 million citizens can exercise their legal right to public information held by various layers and arms of government.

One month is too soon to know how this law is changing a society that has never been able to question their rulers – monarchs, colonials or elected governments – for 25 centuries. But early signs are encouraging.

Sri Lanka’s 22-year advocacy for RTI was led by journalists, lawyers, civil society activists and a few progressive politicians. If it wasn’t a very grassroots campaign, ordinary citizens are beginning to seize the opportunity now.

RTI can be assessed from its ‘supply side’ as well as the ‘demand side’. States are primarily responsible for supplying it, i.e. ensuring that all public authorities are prepared and able to respond to information requests. The demand side is left for citizens, who may act as individuals or in groups.

In Sri Lanka, both these sides are getting into speed, but it still is a bumpy road.

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

Cartoon by Gihan de Chickera, Daily Mirror

During February, we noticed uneven levels of RTI preparedness across the 52 government ministries, 82 departments, 386 state corporations and hundreds of other ‘public authorities’ covered by the RTI Act. After a six month preparatory phase, some institutions were ready to process citizen requests from Day One.  But many were still confused, and a few even turned away early applicants.

One such violator of the law was the Ministry of Health that refused to accept an RTI application for information on numbers affected by Chronic Kidney Disease and treatment being given.

Such teething problems are not surprising — turning the big ship of government takes time and effort. We can only hope that all public authorities, across central, provincial and local government, will soon be ready to deal with citizen information requests efficiently and courteously.

Some, like the independent Election Commission, have already set a standard for this by processing an early request for audited financial reports of all registered political parties for the past five years.

On the demand side, citizens from all walks of life have shown considerable enthusiasm. By late February, according to Dr Ranga Kalansooriya, Director General of the Department of Information, more than 1,500 citizen RTI requests had been received. How many of these requests will ultimately succeed, we have to wait and see.

Reports in the media and social media indicate that the early RTI requests cover a wide range of matters linked to private grievances or public interest.

Citizens are turning to RTI law for answers that have eluded them for years. One request filed by a group of women in Batticaloa sought information on loved ones who disappeared during the 26-year-long civil war, a question shared by thousands of others. A youth group is helping people in the former conflict areas of the North to ask much land is still being occupied by the military, and how much of it is state-owned and privately-owned. Everywhere, poor people want clarity on how to access various state subsidies.

Under the RTI law, public authorities can’t play hide and seek with citizens. They must provide written answers in 14 days, or seek an extension of another 21 days.

To improve their chances and avoid hassle, citizens should ask their questions as precisely as possible, and know the right public authority to lodge their requests. Civil society groups can train citizens on this, even as they file RTI requests of their own.

That too is happening, with trade unions, professional bodies and other NGOs making RTI requests in the public interest. Some of these ask inconvenient yet necessary questions, for example on key political leaders’ asset declarations, and an official assessment of the civil war’s human and property damage (done in 2013).

Politicians and officials are used to dodging such queries under various pretexts, but the right use of RTI law by determined citizens can press them to open up – or else.

President Maithripala Sirisena was irked that a civil society group wanted to see his asset declaration. His government’s willingness to obey its own law will be a litmus test for yahapalana (good governance) pledges he made to voters in 2015.

The Right to Information Commission will play a decisive role in ensuring the law’s proper implementation. “These are early days for the Commission which is still operating in an interim capacity with a skeletal staff from temporary premises,” it said in a media statement on February 10.

The real proof of RTI – also a fundamental right added to Constitution in 2015 – will be in how much citizens use it to hold government accountable and to solve their pressing problems. Watch this space.

Science writer and media researcher Nalaka Gunawardene is active on Twitter as @NalakaG. Views in this post are his own.

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

One by one, Sri Lanka public agencies are displaying their RTI officer details as required by law. Example: http://www.pucsl.gov.lk saved on 24 Feb 2017

Advertisements

Sri Lanka State of the Media Report’s Tamil version released in Jaffna

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Journalists, academics, politicians and civil society representatives joined the launch of Tamil language version of Sri Lanka’s Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report in Jaffna on 24 January 2017.

The report, titled Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka, contains 101 recommendations for media sector reforms needed at different levels – in government policies, laws and regulations, as well as within the media industry, media profession and media teaching.

The report, for which I served as overall editor, is the outcome of a 14-month-long consultative process that involved media professionals, owners, managers, academics and relevant government officials. It offers a timely analysis, accompanied by policy directions and practical recommendations.

The original report was released on World Press Freedom Day (3 May 2016) at a Colombo meeting attended by the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition and Minister of Mass Media.

The Jaffna launch event was organised by the Department of Media Studies of the University of Jaffna, the Jaffna Press Club and the National Secretariat for Media Reforms (NSMR).

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Reginald Cooray, Governor of the Northern Province, in a message said: “I am sure that the elected leaders and the policy makers of this government of Good governance will seize the opportunity to make a professionally ethical media environment in Sri Lanka which will strengthen the democracy and good governance.”

He added: “The research work should be studied, appreciated and utilised by the leaders and the policy makers. Everyone who was involved in the work should be greatly thanked for their research presentation with clarity.”

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report's Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report’s Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Speaking at the event, Sinnadurai Thavarajah, Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Provincial Council, urged journalists to separate facts from their opinions. “Media freedom is important, but so is unbiased and balanced reporting,” he said.

Lars Bestle, Head of Department for Asia and Latin America at International Media Support (IMS), which co-published the report, said: “Creating a healthy environment for the media that is inclusive of the whole country is an essential part of ensuring democratic transition.”

He added: “This assessment points the way forward. It is now up to the local actors – government, civil society, media, businesses and academia – with support from international community, to implement its recommendations.”

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

I introduced the report’s key findings and recommendations. In doing so, I noted how the government has welcomed those recommendations applicable to state policies, laws and regulations and already embarked on law review and regulatory reforms. In sharp contrast, there has been no reaction whatsoever from the media owners and media gatekeepers (editors).

Quote from 'Rebuilding Public Trust' - State of Sri Lanka's media report

Quote from ‘Rebuilding Public Trust’ – State of Sri Lanka’s media report

Dr S Raguram, Head of Media Studies at the University of Jaffna (who edited the Tamil version) and Jaffna Press Club president Ratnam Thayaparan also spoke.

The report comes out at a time when the country’s media industry and profession face multiple crises stemming from an overbearing state, unpredictable market forces and rapid technological advancements.

Balancing the public interest and commercial viability is one of the media sector’s biggest challenges today. The report says: “As the existing business models no longer generate sufficient income, some media have turned to peddling gossip and excessive sensationalism in the place of quality journalism. At another level, most journalists and other media workers are paid low wages which leaves them open to coercion and manipulation by persons of authority or power with an interest in swaying media coverage.”

Notwithstanding these negative trends, the report notes that there still are editors and journalists who produce professional content in the public interest while also abiding by media ethics. Unfortunately, their work is eclipsed by media content that is politically partisan and/or ethnically divisive.

The result: public trust in media has been eroded, and younger Lankans are increasingly turning to entirely web-based media products and social media platforms for information and self-expression. A major overhaul of media’s professional standards and ethics is needed to reverse these trends.

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

The Tamil report is available for free download at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-media-assessment-sri-lanka-tamil-language-version/

The English original report is at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-assessment-media-industry-profession-sri-lanka/

Read my July 2010 op-ed: [Op-ed] Major Reforms Needed to Rebuild Public Trust in Sri Lanka’s Media

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #257: 21 වන සියවසේ අපේ මාධ්‍ය පරිභෝජන රටා වෙනස් වන සැටි

CPA Study on consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka - Jan 2016

CPA Study on consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka – Jan 2016

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 14 February 2016), I discuss key findings of the top-line report of a survey on the consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka. It was launched on 27 January 2016 by the non-profit research and advocacy group, the Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA).

The report draws on a survey of 1,743 randomly selected men and women, interviewed in Sinhala or Tamil language during June-July 2015. They were asked about mobile phone use and web access. The survey was conducted by Social Indicator, CPA’s survey research unit.

As the launch media release noted, “From the use of Facebook to smartphones, from news on TV to news via SMS, from how information read digitally is spread to others who are offline, the report offers insights into how content is produced, disseminated and discussed in Sri Lanka’s most densely populated province and home to the country’s administrative and business hubs.”

I was one of the launch speakers, and my presentation was titled: Information Society is Rising in Sri Lanka: ARE YOU READY?

Dilrukshi Handunnetti (centre) speaks as Nalaka Gunawardene (left) and Iromi Perera listen at the launch on 27 Jan 2016 in Colombo

Dilrukshi Handunnetti (centre) speaks as Nalaka Gunawardene (left) and Iromi Perera listen at the launch on 27 Jan 2016 in Colombo

අපේ රටේ වඩාත්ම පුළුල්ව භාවිත වන සන්නිවේදන මාධ්‍යය කුමක්ද?

විටින් විට සරසවිවලදී හා වෙනත් මහජන සභාවන්හිදී මා කරන දේශනවලදී මේ ප‍්‍රශ්නය මතු කරනවා. සභාවේ සිටින අයගේ දැනුම හා ආකල්ප ගැන හොඳ ඉඟියක් ඔවුන් මෙයට පිළිතුරු දෙන ආකාරයෙන් මට ලද හැකියි.

නිවැරදි පිළිතුර රේඩියෝ බවට තර්ක කරන අය මට තවමත් හමු වනවා. ඔවුන්ගේ දැනුම දශක එක හමාරකට වඩා පැරණියි.

වසර 2000 පමණ වන තුරු මෙරට නිවෙස්වල බහුලවම හමු වූයේ රේඩියෝ යන්ත‍්‍ර බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් ඉනික්බිති ටෙලිවිෂන් යන්ත‍්‍ර එම තැන හිමි කර ගත්තා.

වසර තුනකට වරක් නිවාස 25,000ක පමණ විශාල දීපව්‍යාප්ත නියැදියක් හරහා රජයේ ජනලේඛන හා සංඛ්‍යා ලේඛන දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව කරන ගෘහස්ත ආදායම් හා වියදම් සමීක්ෂණවල ප‍්‍රතිඵල හරහා මෙය මනාව තහවුරු වනවා.

මෙවන් රාජ්‍ය සමීක්ෂණයකින් මතු වන සොයා ගැනීම් පවා සමහරුන් ප‍්‍රශ්න කරනවා. ‘සමීක්ෂණවලින් මොනවා සොයා ගත්තත් අපේ ගම්වල තාමත් වැඩි දෙනෙක් භාවිත කරන්නේ රේඩියෝව තමයි’ කියමින් රොමැන්ටික් ලෝකවල ජීවත් වන අය සිටිනවා.

2012 ජන සංගණනයේදී එක් ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් වූයේ නිවසේ තිබෙන සන්නිවේදන මෙවලම් ගැනයි. මුළු රටම සමීක්ෂාවට ලක් කළ මෙයින් හෙළි වූයේ රටේ නිවෙස්වල දැන් වැඩිපුරම ඇති සන්නිවේදන මෙවලම ජංගම දුරකතනය බවයි. (78.9%). එයට ආසන්නව දෙවැනි තැන ගන්නේ ටෙලිවිෂන් (78.3%). රේඩියෝව ලබා ඇත්තේ තෙවන ස්ථානයයි (68.9%).

මේ සංඛ්යා ලේඛන වාර්ෂිකව වෙනස් වනවා. අලූත්ම දත්ත හා විශ්ලේෂණ හරහා අපේ දැනුම යාවත්කාලීන කර ගැනීම ඉතා වැදගත්. නැතිනම් පිළුණු වූ දැනුම හරහා වැරදි නිගමන හා රොමාන්ටික් තර්කවලට එළැඹීමේ අවදානමක් තිබෙනවා.

සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් හා සේවාවන් සමාජයක ප‍්‍රචලිත වීම ගැන රාජ්‍ය පර්යේෂණායතනවල සමීක්ෂණ හා අලෙවිකරණ දත්ත හරහා යම් අවබෝධයක් ලද හැකියි. මෙය මා දකින්නේ සන්නිවේදනයේ සැපයුම් පැත්ත (supply side of communications) හැටියටයි.

එහෙත් මෙහි ඉල්ලූම් පැත්ත හෙවත් ජන සමාජයේ විවිධ පුද්ගලයන් මේවා කිනම් භාවිතයන් සඳහා යොදා ගන්නවාද යන්න විමර්ශනය කිරීම වඩාත් අසීරුයි (demand side). එවන් ගවේෂණවලදී කිසිදු සන්නිවේදන මාධ්‍යයක් ගැන පූර්ව මතයක් හෝ නිගමනයක් හෝ තබා නොගෙන විවෘත මනසකින් තොරතුරු එක් රැස් කිරීම අත්‍යවශ්‍යයි.

මෙරට බස්නාහිර පළාතේ වැසියන් ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය හා නව මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන සැටි ගැන කළ සමීක්ෂණයක ප‍්‍රතිඵල ජනවාරි 27දා නිකුත් වුණා. සමීක්ෂණය කළේ විකල්ප ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති කේන්ද්‍රයට (Centre for Policy Alternatives, CPA) අනුයුක්ත ජනමත විමසීම් අංශය වන Social Indicator ආයතනයයි. මෙහි ප්‍රතිඵල සන්නිවේදනයට සම්බන්ධ සැමගේ අවධානයට ලක් විය යුතුයි.

බස්නාහිර පළාත මේ සමීක්ෂණයට යොදා ගැනීම තේරුම් ගත හැකියි. රටේ දළ ජාතික නිෂ්පාදිතයෙන් 43%ක් දායක කරන මේ පළාත වැඩියෙන්ම ජනගහනය, මාධ්‍ය කර්මාන්ත හා තාක්ෂණ භාවිතය සංකේන්ද්‍රණය වී ඇති ප‍්‍රදේශයයි. එසේම ආදායම් මට්ටම් ද සාපේක්ෂව වැඩි නිසා නව තාක්ෂණයන් හා වෙළෙඳපොළ ප‍්‍රවණතා මුලින් ප‍්‍රචලිත වන්නේත් මේ පළාතේයි.

බස්නාහිර පළාත තුළ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය අධ්‍යයනයෙන් දිවයිනේ සෙසු ප‍්‍රදේශවල ඒ ගැන ඉදිරි ප‍්‍රවණතා ගැන ඉඟියක් ලද හැකියි. මෙවන් සමීක්ෂණ දීපව්‍යාප්තව කිරීමට CPA අදහස් කරනවා.

2015 ජුනි-ජූලි වකවානුවේ ක්ෂේත‍්‍ර දත්ත එකතු කළ මේ සමීක්ෂණයට බස්නාහිර පළාත පුරාම විහිදුණු පුද්ගලයන් 1,743ක් සම්බන්ධ කරගනු ලැබුවා. සමීක්ෂණයට සහභාගි වන්නන් තෝරා ගැනීමට නිර්ණායක දෙකක් යොදා ගත්තා. එනම් ඔවුන් ජංගම දුරකතන භාවිත කිරීම හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් පරිශීලනය කිරීමයි.

සිංහල හෝ දෙමළ බසින් සමීක්ෂකයන් අසන ප‍්‍රශ්නාවලියකට පිළිතුරු සටහන් කර ගත් අතර පිරිමි 55.8%ක් හා ගැහැනු 44.2%ක් සහභාගි වූවා. ඔවුන් තෝරා ගනු ලැබුවේ අලෙවිකරණ සමීක්ෂණ (market research) කිරීමේ ජාත්‍යන්තර ප‍්‍රමිතීන්ට අනුකූලව අහඹු ලෙසයි.

කාලීන තොරතුරු දැන ගැනීමට හා ඒවා අන් අය සමග බෙදා ගැනීමට කුමන සන්නිවේදන මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරනවාද යන්න මෙහිදී සොයා බැලූණා. සමීක්ෂණයට සම්බන්ධ වූවන්ගෙන් අති බහුතරයක් (97.4%) එදිනෙදා පුවත් ගැන අතිශයින් හෝ තරමක් දුරට හෝ උනන්දුවක් දක්වන බව කීවා.

ඔවුන් බහුතරයකගේ වඩාත්ම ජනප‍්‍රිය පුවත් මූලාශ‍්‍රය වූයේ පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් සේවාවන්. ඉන් පසු වැඩිපුරම සඳහන් කෙරුණේ ෆේස්බුක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලය හා සෙසු ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ප‍්‍රභවයන්.

මෙම පිළිතුරු වයස් කාණ්ඩ අනුව විග‍්‍රහ කළ විට වයස 18-24 පරාසයේ අයට නම් වඩාත්ම ප‍්‍රමුඛ පුවත් මූලාශ‍්‍රය වූයේ ෆේස්බුක්. දෙවැනි තැනට පුද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් හා තෙවැනි තැනට සෙසු ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ප‍්‍රභවයන්.

පුවත්වල විශ්වසනීයත්වය ගැන ද ප‍්‍රශ්න කරනු ලැබුවා. ප‍්‍රතිචාරකයන් 63.1%ක් කීවේ විශ්වාස කළ හැකි පුවත් ප‍්‍රභවයන් එකකට වඩා තමන් දන්නා බවයි. සියලූ පුවත් මාධය තමන්ට එක හා සමාන බව කී 25.3%ක්ද කිසිදු මාධ්‍යයක් විශ්වාස නොකළ 10%ක්ද සිටියා.

සමීක්ෂණයට පාත‍්‍ර වූ අයගෙන් 50%ක්ම කීවේ ගෙවී ගිය වසර තුළ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය හෝ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා හෝ තමන් දැන ගත් සමාජයීය හෝ දේශපාලනික තොරතුරක් ගැන තමන් වැඩිදුර සොයා බැලූ හා දැනුවත් වූ බවයි.

එවන් තොරතුරක් ගැන කිසිදු ක‍්‍රියාමාර්ගයක් ගත්තාදැයි අසනු ලැබුවා. එහිදී ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා ලද තොරතුරක් ගැන ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වූ සංඛ්‍යාව 22.9%ක් වූ අතර, ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යයකින් ලද තොරතුරක් නිසා යම් පියවරක් ගත් සංඛ්‍යාව මුළු නියැදියෙන් 20.8%ක් වුණා.

කුමක්ද මේ ක‍්‍රියාමාර්ගය? 61.5%ක් දෙනා පවුලේ අය හා හිතමිතුරන් දැනුවත් කිරීමට ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා ලද තොරතුරු යොදා ගෙන තිබෙනවා. ඒ අතර 16.5%ක් දෙනා වෙබ්ගත සංවාදවලට සහභාගි වී තිබෙනවා.

මේ සොයා ගැනීම ඉතා වැදගත්. 2015 ජූනි නිකුත් කළ විදුලි සංදේශ නියාමන කොමිසමේ (TRC) නිල දත්තවලට අනුව මෙරට සමස්ත ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ගිණුම් සංඛ්‍යාව මිලියන 4.3යි. සමහර ගිණුම් එක් අයකුට වඩා භාවිත කරන නිසා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් පරිශීලනය කරන සංඛ්‍යාව මිලියන 6ක් හෝ ජනගහනයෙන් 28%ක් පමණ යැයි අපට ඇස්තමේන්තු කළ හැකියි.

Hand holding a cell phone under social media icons on blue background Vector file available.

මෙය තවමත් සංඛ්‍යාත්මකව සුළුතරයක් බව ඇත්තයි. එහෙත් ඉහත සොයා ගැනීම තහවුරු කරන පරිදි ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ඍජුව භාවිත කරන අය ලබා ගන්නා තොරතුරු හා අදහස් ඔවුන් විසින් තම තමන්ගේ සමීපතයන් හා පෞද්ගලික ජාලයන් සමග බෙදා ගැනෙනවා. මේ හරහා වෙබ්ගත අන්තර්ගතය එහි සෘජුව නොගැවසෙන විශාල පිරිසක් අතරට ද කාන්දු වනවා.

විශේෂයෙන් ගුරුවරුන්, මාධ්‍යවේදීන්, පර්යේෂකයන් වැනි අයගේ තොරතුරු විකාශය කිරීමේ (information amplification) විභවය ඉහළයි. ගමක හෝ ප‍්‍රජාවක එක් අයකු ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හරහා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් පිවිසීම කළොත් කාලීන තොරතුරු එම ගමටම ගලා යාමේ හැකියාව ඉහළයි.

ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සුළුතරයකගේ සුපිරි මාධ්‍යයක්ය කියමින් එය ගැන එතරම් නොතකන පණ්ඩිතයන් නොදකින යථාර්ථය මෙයයි!

CPA සමීක්ෂණයට සහභාගි වූවන්ගෙන් 77.3%ක්ම ඉන්ටර්නෙට් පිවිසියේ තම ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හරහා. මෙය දීපව්‍යාප්ත TRC සංඛ්‍යා ලේඛනය වන 83%ට සමීපයි.

අලූත් තොරතුරක් ලද විට එය බෙදා ගැනීම මානව ගති සොබාවක්. මේ පුරුද්දට ජංගම දුරකතන හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය හරහා ලොකු තල්ලූවක් ලැබෙනවා.

සිත් ගන්නා පුවතක් හෝ ලිපියක් හෝ ඊමේල් මගින් ලදහොත් එය අන් අය සමග ත්‍බදා ගන්නට කැමති බව සමීක්ෂණයේ ප‍්‍රතිචාරකයන් 55.9%ක් කියා තිබෙනවා. ඒ සඳහා ඊමේල් (23.6%), සමාජ මාධ්‍ය (18.4%) හෝ ඒ දෙකම (13.9%) යොදා ගන්නවා.

වැදගත් හෝ සිත් ගන්නා යමක් ඔබේ ජංගම දුරකතනයට ලැබුණොත් කුමක් කරනවාද? මේ ප‍්‍රශ්නයට 24.2%ක් දෙනා කීවේ එක්කෝ කෙටි පණිවුඩයක් (SMS) හෝ ක්ෂණික පණිවුඩ යෙදුමක් (Instant Messaging, IM) හරහා බෙදා ගන්නා බවයි. 16.6% කීවේ එම තොරතුර සමාජ ජාල හරහා ‘ෂෙයාර්’ කරන බවයි. මේ දෙකම කරන බව කී පිරිස 16.2%ක් ද සිටියා.

මෙසේ පුළුල්ව බෙදා ගැනීමේ හොඳ නරක දෙකම තිබෙනවා. සමබර තොරතුරු මෙන්ම අසත්‍ය හෝ අන්තවාදී තොරතුරු ද ඉක්මනින් පැතිර යා හැකියි.

ප‍්‍රතිචාරකයන් 37.2%ක් කීවේ යම් පුවතක් ඍජුව වෙබ් අඩවියක පළ වී තිබී දැන ගන්නවාට වඩා එම පුවතම මිතුරන්/සහෘදයන් මගින් ඊමේල් හෝ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හෝ හරහා ලද හොත් තමන් එය වඩාත් විශ්වාස කරන බවයි.

එසේම 51.1%ක් දෙනා කීවේ මින් පෙර තමන් කිස්සේත් විශ්වාස නොකළ පුවතක්, තම මිතුරකු විසින් සමාජ මාධ්‍යයක් හරහා බෙදා ගත් විට එම පුවත ගැන මුලින් දැක්වූ අවිශ්වාසය පසෙක ලා තමන් එය නැවත සලකා බැලිය හැකි බවයි.

මෙසේ සහෘදයන් විසින් යමක් ෂෙයාර්කිරීම හරහා එහි විශ්වසනීයත්වය වැඩි කර ගැනීම ඉන්ටර්නෙට් මාධ්‍ය පුරාම දැකිය හැකි ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්.

මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයේ විශ්වසනීයත්වය තහවුරු කර ගැනීම මාධ්‍ය සාක්ෂරතාවයේ වැදගත් අංගයක්. මෑතක් වන තුරු එය සදහා අප බොහෝ දෙනකු යොදා ගත්තේ අදාල මාධ්‍ය ආයතනයෙහි සමස්ත කෙරුවාව හා අදාල ලේඛකයාගේ මීට පෙර ක‍්‍රියාකලාපය ආදී සාධකයි. සහෘදයන් විසින් නිර්දේශ කරනු ලැබීම දැන් ප‍්‍රබල සාධකයක්ව තිබෙනවා.

එහෙත් යමක් ලියූ තැනැත්තා තවමත් බොහෝ දෙනකුට වැදගත්. පුවත්පතක හෝ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ප‍්‍රභවයක පුවතක් හෝ ලිපියක් ලියූ ලේඛකයාගේ නම තමන් සැළකිල්ලට ගන්නා බව 63.2%ක් දෙනා කියනවා.

2015දී තීරණාත්මක ජාතික මැතිවරණ දෙකක් මෙරට පැවැත් වුණා. මැතිවරණ කාලයේදී වැඩිම විශ්වාසයක් තිබෙන තොරතුරු මූලාශ‍්‍රය කුමක්ද?

වැඩිම පිරිසක් (40.3%ක්) මැතිවරණ කාලයේදී වඩාත්ම විශ්වාස කළේ පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකායි. ඉතිරි අයගෙන් 18.3%ක් කීවේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් බවයි. තවත් 16%ක් ෆේස්බුක් මුල් තැනට පත් කළා. පත්තර හා රේඩියෝ ගැන මහජන විශ්වාසය බෙහෙවින් අඩු වෙලා!

මහජනතාව සමග සබඳතා පැවැත්වීමට රජයේ ඇමතිවරුන් නිල වශයෙන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කිරීම අවශ්‍ය බව 42.2%ක් දෙනා විශ්වාස කරනවා. තවත් 26.2%ක් දෙනා එය තරමක් දුරට හෝ අවශ්‍ය යයි කියනවා. (මෙහිදී කතා කරන්නේ දේශපාලන ප‍්‍රතිරූප වර්ධනය නොව අමාත්‍යාංශවල මහජන තොරතුරු හා සේවා සැපයීමට සෙසු ක‍්‍රමවේදයන්ට අමතරව සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ද යොදා ගැනීම ගැනයි. ඉන්දියාවේ නරේන්ද්‍ර මෝඩි රජය මෙය සියලූ රාජ්‍ය ආයතනවලට අනිවාර්ය කොට තිබෙනවා.)

දේශීය භාෂාවලින් වෙබ් අන්තර්ගතය සීමිත වීම පෙර තරම් දරුණු නොවූවත් තවමත් බලපාන සාධකයක්. සිංහලෙන් හා දෙමළෙන් තොරතුරු හා වෙබ් අඩවි වැඩි වේ නම් තමන් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතයද වැඩි කරන බව සමීක්ෂණයට පාත‍්‍ර වූවන්ගෙන් 57.1%ක් දෙනා කියා සිටියා.

එසේම 60.4%ක් කීවේ තමන්ට දත්ත භාවිතය වෙනුවෙන් වැඩිපුර ගෙවීමේ හැකියාවක් තිබේ නම් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය වැඩි වනු ඇති බවයි.

L to R - Dilrukshi Handunnetti, Iromi Perera, Sanjana Hattotuwa at CPA report launch, Colombo, 27 Jan 2016

L to R – Dilrukshi Handunnetti, Iromi Perera, Sanjana Hattotuwa at CPA report launch, Colombo, 27 Jan 2016

දැනට පවත්නා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වේගයන්වල මදකමද සමහරුන්ගේ මැසිවිල්ලට හේතුවක්. යම් ඉහළ මිලක් ගෙවා තමන්ට වඩා වේගවත් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සේවා ලද හැකි නම් එය සලකා බලන බව 30.8%ක් දෙනා කීවා. තවත් 42.5%ක් සමහරවිට එසේ කරනු ඇතැයි කීවා.

ඊමේල් හා වෙබ් ප‍්‍රභවයන්ට අමතරව SMS පුවත් සේවාවන්ට මිලක් ගෙවා බැඳී ඇති පිරිස සමීක්ෂණයේ ප‍්‍රතිචාරකයන් අතරින් 34.8%ක් වූවා.

මේ සමීක්ෂණයේ ප‍්‍රතිඵල විවිධ අයුරින් විග‍්‍රහ කළ හැකියි. එය එළි දැක්වීමේදී මා කීවේ මෙවන් සමීක්ෂණ දත්ත පොදු අවකාශයේ බෙදා ගැනීම වැදගත් බවයි. අලෙවිකරණ පර්යේෂණායතන කරන බොහෝ සමීක්ෂණ ප‍්‍රකාශයට පත් වන්නේ නැහැ.

එසේම වයස 18-24 පරාසයේ ජන කාණ්ඩයේ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය සෙසු සමාජයට වඩා සැලකිය යුතු ලෙසින් වෙනස් වීම සමීප අධ්‍යයනයට ලක් කළ යුතු බව මා අවධාරණය කළා.

ඔවුන් පත්තර කියවන්නේ, රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් සමග බද්ධ වන්නේද ඩිජිටල් ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හරහායි. එසේම ඔවුන් නිශ්ක්‍රිය මාධ්‍ය පාරිභෝගිකයන් නොවෙයි. ඔවුන් බොහෝ දෙනකු මාධ්‍යවලට එසැනින් ප්‍රතිචාර දක්වනවා. ප්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය මෙන්ම වෙබ් අන්තර්ගතයන්ද විචාරයට ලක් කරනවා. තමන්ගේම මාධ්‍ය නිර්මාණ (මීම්, කෙටි වීඩියෝ ආදිය) නිපදවා වෙබ් හරහා බෙදා ගන්නවා.

ඉදිරි වසරවලදී මෙරට මාධ්‍ය ග්‍රාහකයන් ලෙස වඩාත් ප්‍රබල වන්නේ මේ පිරිසයි. අපේ ගතානුගතිකයන් කැමති වූවත් නැතත් අනාගතය මේ තරුණ තරුණියන් අතින් හැඩ ගැසෙනවා. ඔවුන්ගේ ගති සොබා දැන ගනීම හා ඔවුන්ට සමීප වන මාර්ග සොයා ගැනීම දේශපාලන පක්ෂ, සිවිල් සමාජ හා සමාගම් යන සියලු පාර්ශවයන්ට එක සේ වැදගත්.

සම්පූර්ණ CPA වාර්තාව මෙතැනින්: www.bit.ly/mediasurveywp

Posted in Broadcasting, citizen media, Digital Divide, digital media, Digital Natives, ICT, Internet, Journalism, Media, New media, Ravaya Column, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Television, youth. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Information Society is Rising in Sri Lanka: ARE YOU READY?

Launch of the top-line report of a survey on the consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka, 27 Jan 2016

Launch of the top-line report of a survey on the consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka, 27 Jan 2016

On 27 January 2016, the Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA) launched the top-line report of a survey on the consumption and perceptions of mainstream and social media in the Western Province of Sri Lanka.

I was one of the launch speakers, and my presentation was titled: Information Society is Rising in Sri Lanka: ARE YOU READY?

The report draws on a survey of 1,743 randomly selected men and women, interviewed in Sinhala or Tamil language during June-July 2015. They were asked about mobile phone use and web access. The survey was conducted by Social Indicator, CPA’s survey research unit.

As the launch media release noted, “From the use of Facebook to smartphones, from news on TV to news via SMS, from how information read digitally is spread to others who are offline, the report offers insights into how content is produced, disseminated and discussed in Sri Lanka’s most densely populated province and home to the country’s administrative and business hubs.

It added: “The report offers government, media, civil society and social entrepreneurs insights into the platforms, vectors, languages and mediums through which news & information can best seed the public imagination.”

Dilrukshi Handunnetti (centre) speaks as Nalaka Gunawardene (left) and Iromi Perera listen at the launch on 27 Jan 2016 in Colombo

Dilrukshi Handunnetti (centre) speaks as Nalaka Gunawardene (left) and Iromi Perera listen at the launch on 27 Jan 2016 in Colombo – Photo by Sampath Samarakoon

In my remarks, I said it was vital to draw more insights on what I saw as ‘demand-side’ of media. But at the same time, I noted how a growing number of media consumers are no longer passively receiving, but also critiquing, repackaging and generating related (or new) content on their own.

I applauded the fact that this survey’s findings are shared in the public domain – in fact, Iromi Perera, head of Social Indicator, offered to share the full dataset with any interested person. This contrasts with similar surveys conducted by market research companies that are, by their very nature, not going to be made public.

A case in point: Jaffna has highest per capita Internet penetration in Sri Lanka, according to a market research by TNS Sri Lanka – but neither the findings nor methodology is available for scrutiny.

Why do demand-side insights being available in the public domain matter so much? I cited four key reasons:

  • The new government is keen on media sector reforms at policy and regulatory levels: these should be based on evidence and sound analysis, not conjecture.
  • Media, telecom and digital industries are converging: everyone looking for ‘killer apps’ and biz opps (but only some find it).
  • Media companies are competing for a finite advertising budget: knowing more about media consumption can help improve production and delivery.
  • Advertisers want the biggest bang for their buck: Where are eyeballs? How to get to them? Independent studies can inform sound decision-making.

On this last point, I noted how Sri Lanka’s total ad spend up to and including 2014 does not show any significant money going into digital advertising. According to Neilsen Sri Lanka, ad-spending is dominated by broadcast TV, followed by radio an print. Experience elsewhere suggests this is going to change – but how soon, and what can guide new digital ad spending? Studies like this can help.

I also highlighted some interesting findings of this new study, such as:

  • Private TV is most popular source of news, followed by Facebook/web.
  • Across different age groups, smartphone is the device most used to access web
  • Online culture of sharing engenders TRUST: peer influence is becoming a key determinant in how fast and widely a given piece of content is consumed

None of this surprises me, and in fact confirms my own observations as a long-standing observer and commentator of the spread of ICTs in Sri Lanka.

Everyone – from government and political parties to civil society groups and corporates – who want to engage the Lankan public must take note of the changing media consumption and creation patterns indicated by this study, I argued.

I identified these big challenges particularly for civil society and others engaged in public interest communication (including mainstream and citizen journalists):

  • Acknowledge that we live in a media-rich information society (Get used to it!)
  • Appreciate that younger Lankans consume and process media content markedly differently from their elders and previous generations
  • Understand these differences (stop living in denial)
  • Leverage the emerging digital pathways and channels for social advocacy & public interest work

In my view, rising to this challenge is not a CHOICE, but an IMPERATIVE!

I ended reiterating my call for more research on information society issues, and with particular focus on mobile web content access which trend dominates user behaviour in Sri Lanka.

Award winning journalist Dilrukshi Handunnetti, and head of Social Indicator Iromi Perera were my fellow panelists at the launch, which was moderated by the study’s co-author and CPA senior researcher Sanjana Hattotuwa.

L to R - Dilrukshi Handunnetti, Iromi Perera, Sanjana Hattotuwa at CPA report launch, Colombo, 27 Jan 2016

L to R – Dilrukshi Handunnetti, Iromi Perera, Sanjana Hattotuwa at CPA report launch, Colombo, 27 Jan 2016

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #207: “තොරතුරු නීතිය ලැබුණාට මදි. එයින් නිසි ඵල නෙළා ගත යුතුයි!”

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala), I continue the Sinhala adaptation of my June 2014 TV interview with Dr Rajesh Tandon of India, an internationally acclaimed leader and practitioner of participatory research and development.

Last week, we discussed the civil space and political space available for advocacy and activism – and how far civil society activists have been able to engage the formal political process in India.

Today, we discuss how anti-corruption movement evolved into the Aam Aadmi Party, AAP, and the relevance of India’s experiences to Sri Lanka. We also discuss India’s Right to Information Act and how that has empowered citizens to seek a more open and accountable government at national, state and local levels. Dr Tandon ends by emphasizing that democracy is a work in progress that needs constant engagement and vigilance.

Part 1 of this interview: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #206: ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ සිවිල් සමාජ සාධකය ඉන්දියානු ඇසින්

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene, June 2014

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene, June 2014

2015 පෙබරවාරි 7 වනදා නැවතත් පැවති දිල්ලි ප්‍රාන්ත මැතිවරනයේදී පොදු මිනිසාගේ පක්ෂය ආමි ආද්මි ^Aam Aadmi Party, AAP& මුලු ආසන 70න් 67ක්ම දිනා ගනිමින් විශිෂ්ට ජයක් ලබා ගත්තා. රටේ පාලක භාරතීය ජනතා පක්ෂයට (BJP) ඉතිරි ආසන 3 හිමි වුණා.

මීට පෙර 2013 දෙසැම්බර් 4 වනදා පැවති දිල්ලි මැතිවරනය්දී ආසන 28ක් දිනා ගෙන ප්‍රාන්ත රජයක් පිහිටුවා ගත් ආම් ආද්මි එය කර ගෙන ගියේ මාස දෙකකට අඩු කාලයක්ග 2014 පෙබරවාරි 14දා ඔවුන් ඉල්ලා අස් වුණා.

මේ දෙවන වාරයේ ඔවුන්ගේ භූමිකාව කුමක් වේදැයි කිව නොහැකියි. එහෙත් 2014 ජාතික මහ මැතිවරනයෙන් පහසු ජයක් ලද භාරතීය ජනතා පක්ෂයට අභියෝග කරන්නට තරම් සිවිල් සමාජ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයන් අතරින් මතු වූ මේ ලාබාල පක්ෂයට හැකිව තිබෙනවා.

2014 ජුනි මාසයේ මා ඉන්දියාවේ ප‍්‍රවීණතම සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයකු හා සහභාගිත්ව සංවර්ධනය ගැන ලොව පිළිගත් විද්වතකු වන ආචාර්ය රාජේෂ් ටැන්ඩන් (Dr Rajesh Tandon) සමග ටෙලිවිෂන් සාකච්ඡුාවක් කළා.

එහි මුල් කොටස ගිය සතියේ පළ කළා. අද එහි ඉතිරි කොටස. මෙය මීට මාස අටකට පෙර සිදු වූ කතාබහක් බව සිහි තබා ගන්න. සාකච්ඡාව වෙබ් හරහා බලන්න – https://vimeo.com/118544161

නාලක: දූෂන විරෝධී සිවිල් සමාජ ක්රියකාරිකයන් පිරිසක් දේශපාලන පක්ෂයක් පිහිටුව ගත්තේ ඇයි?

රාජේෂ් ටැන්ඩන්: ලෝක්පාල් නම් වූ දූෂණ විරෝධී පනත (Jan Lokpal Bill) පසුගිය පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ (2009-2014) පල් වන විට අන්නා හසාරේ ඇතුළු පිරිසට පෙනී ගියා සියලු දේශපාලන පක්ෂ මේ ගැන සැබෑ උනන්දුවක් නොගන්නා බව. ඒ පසුබිම තුළ තමයි ආමි ආද්මි පක්ෂය බිහි වූයේ, දේශපාලන අවකාශයෙන් පිටත සිට කළ හැකි සියලූම බලපෑම් කිරීමෙන් අනතුරුව මේ සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරීන් එහි යා හැකි දුරේ සීමා තිබෙන බව තේරුම් ගත්තා. ඔවුන් සක‍්‍රිය පක්ෂ දේශපාලනයට පිවිසියේ ඉන් පසුවයි.

Anna Hazare (left) and Arvind Kejriwal

Anna Hazare (left) and Arvind Kejriwal

අන්නා හසාරේ (Anna Hazare) සහ අනුගාමිකයන් අතර මේ ගැන රතිවිරුද්ධ මත තිබුණා නේද? හසාරේ රියාකාරී දේශපාලනයට පිවිසීමට රතික්ෂේප කළත් ඔහුගේ දෙවැනියා අර්වින්ද් කෙජ්රිවාල් (Arvind Kejriwal) පොදු මිනිසාගේ පක්ෂය පිහිටුවා ගත්තා. ඔවුන් දෙමගක ගියාද?

මේ විවාදය කලක සිටම ඉන්දියාවේ පවතින්නක්. විශේෂයෙන්ම රටේ තීරණාත්මක සංධිස්ථානවලදී එයට කෙසේ ප‍්‍රතිචාර දැක්විය යුතුද යන්න සරසවි සිසුන් හා සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් මෙනෙහි කරනවා. සක‍්‍රිය දේශපාලනයට පිවිසීම එක් ප‍්‍රතිචාරයක්. ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩ අරගලවලට යොමු වීම තවත් ප‍්‍රතිචාරයක්. සත්‍යග‍්‍රහ හා සාමකාමී උද්ඝෝෂණ කිරීම තව එකක්. මේ එක එකක් සාධාරණ යයි කීමට එයට පිවිසි අයට තර්ක ද තිබුණා.

අන්නා හසාරේ තරයේ විශ්වාස කළේ පක්ෂ දේශපාලනයට පිවිසීම හරහා දූෂණ විරෝධී ජනතා ව්‍යාපාරයේ එතෙක් පවත්වා ගෙන ආ සාරධර්මීය පිවිතුරු බව අහිමි වන බවයි. එහි යම් ඇත්තක් තිබෙනවා. අද කාලේ පක්ෂ දේශපාලනය කරන්නට මුදල්, පිරිස් බලය හා මාධ්‍ය සමග මනාව ගනුදෙනු කිරීම අවශ්‍යයි. එහෙත් අර්වින්ද් කෙජ්රිවාල් ඇතුළු පිරිසක් තර්ක කළේ ප‍්‍රශ්නයේ සැබෑ මුල් ඇති සක‍්‍රිය දේශපාලනයට පිවිසීමෙන් පමණක් දූෂණයේ අක්මුල් පාදා ගෙන විසඳුම් සැපයීමට හැකි බවයි.

ඉතා කෙටි කලක් තුළ ඔවුන් නාගරිකයන් අතර මහත් ජනාදරයට පත් වුණා නේද?

කෙටි කාලයක් තුළ කෙජ්රිවාල්ගේ පක්ෂය දිල්ලියේ ප‍්‍රාන්ත පාලන රජයක් පිහිටුවා ගන්නට මැතිවරණ ජයග‍්‍රහණයක් ලැබුවා (2013 දෙසැම්බර්). ඔවුන් වසර ගණනාවක සිට බිම් මට්ටමින් කළ ජනතා ව්‍යාපාර (ත‍්‍රීරෝද හා රික්ෂෝ රියදුරන්ගේ අයිතිවාසිකම් තහවුරු කිරීම, විදුලිබල හා ජල ප‍්‍රවාහනය විධිමත් කිරීම, දුගී ජනයාට සහන මිලට ධාන්‍ය ලබාදීම) හරහා ගොඩ නගා ගත් හොඳ හිතක් තිබුණා. එහි උපකාරයෙන් දිල්ලියේ බලයට පත්වන්නට හැකි වුණා. සීමිත බල ප‍්‍රදේශයක් තුළ ඔවුන් කෙටි කලක් පාලනය කළා.

නමුත් 2014 මහ මැතිවරණයේදී ආම් ආද්මි පක්ෂයට දිනා ගත හැකි වූයේ ආසන හතරක් පමණයි. ඉන්දියාවේ තෙවන බලවේගයක් වන්නට ඔවුන්ට හැකිද?

ආම් ආද්මි පක්ෂයේ වඩාත් ප‍්‍රමුඛව මහජනයා ඉදිරියට ආ මුහුණු බොහොමයක් කලක් තිස්සේ සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරීත්වයේ යෙදී සිටි සමාජ සේවකයන් හා විද්වතුන්. මේ නිසා ආමි ආද්මියට හොඳ ජනතාවාදී පදනමක් හා දැක්මක් මුල පටන්ම ලැබුණා. මෙය සාම්ප‍්‍රදායික දේශපාලන පක්ෂ යම් තැති ගැන්මකට පත් කළා.

එවිට රාජ්‍ය පක්ෂ හා විපක්ෂ දෙකේම එවකට සිටි දේශපාලකයන් කළේ ආමි ආද්මි ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන්ගේ ඇද කුද සෙවීමයි. 2012 යම් අවස්ථාවක හිටපු අගමැති මන් මෝහන් සිං ප‍්‍රකාශයක් කළේ විදේශ බලවේගයන් රාජ්‍ය නොවන සංවිධාන (NGO) හා සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් හරහා ඉන්දියාවේ ඉදිරි ගමන කඩාකප්පල් කරන්නට තැත් කරන බවයි!

විදෙස් හස්තය (foreign hand) නොහොත් අදිසි හස්තය (hidden hand) ගැන චෝදනා කිරීම අපේ රටවල කලක සිට කෙරෙන දෙයක් නේද?

ඇත්තටම. එක්කෝ අමෙරිකානු හස්තය, නැතිනම් ස්කනැඞ්නේවියානු හස්තයට දොස් කීම අපේ ඉන්දියානු සිරිතක්. එහෙත් රටේ නායකයා අගමැතිවරයා මෙබඳු ප‍්‍රකාශයක් කළ මුල් වතාව මෙයයි. ඊට පෙර එබඳු චෝදනා කළේ තනතුරින් වඩාත් කනිෂ්ඨ දේශපාලකයන් පමණයි.

මෙයින් පෙනි ගියේ විධිමත් දේශපාලන අවකාශයට සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් පිවිසීමට එරෙහිව වෘත්තීය දේශපාලකයන්ගේ ප‍්‍රතිරෝධයයි. රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරිවාදය උච්ච අන්දමින් මුදා හැර තමන් නොකැමැති රාජ්‍ය නොවන සංවිධාන පරීක්ෂා කිරීමට හා ඔවුන්ට හිරිහැර කිරීමට බලයේ සිටින දේශපාලකයන් පෙළඹෙන සැටි අපි දන්නවා. ඒ හරහා ඔවුන් සිවිල් සමාජයට වක‍්‍රව පණිවුඩයක් යවනවා….අපත් සමග හැප්පෙන්න ආවොත් බලා ගෙනයි කියා.

2014 මහ මැතිවරණයෙන් ආමි ආද්මි පක්ෂය ජාතික වශයෙන් බලවේගයක් ලෙස ඉස්මතු වූයේ නැහැ. එහි වැදගත්ම පාඩම මෙයයි. ඉන්දියාව වැනි අතිශයින් විවිධ වූත් විශාල වූත් රටක සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් සිවිල් අවකාශයේ සිට දේශපාලන අවකාශයට පිවිසි විට ඔවුන්ට සාර්ථක විය හැක්කේ යම් භූගෝලීය වශයෙන් සීමිත ප‍්‍රදේශයක පමණයි. ජාතික මට්ටමෙන් එතරම් බලපෑමක් කළ හැකි ඡන්ද ප‍්‍රතිශතයක් ලබා ගැනීම අසීරුයි.

එය එසේ වන්නේ ඇයි?

සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් සිය පොදු උන්නතියට කැපවූ කටයුතු හරහා සමාජයීය ප‍්‍රාග්ධනයක් (social capital) ගොඩනගා ගෙන තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් ඉන්දියාව වැනි විශාල රටක එය අදාළ වන්නේ එක් නගරයකට හෝ ප‍්‍රාන්තයකට පමණයි. මුළු රටටම හා බිලියන් 1.2ක ජනයාට ස්පර්ශ වන අන්දමේ සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් බිහි වන්නේ ඉතා කලාතුරකින්.

ආමි ආද්මි පක්ෂය 2013 දිල්ලියේ රාන්ත රජය (Delhi legislative assembly) ජයගරහණය කළත් පාලනය කළේ දින 49යි. එහිදී ඔවුන්ගේ ජනපරියවාදී (populist) පිළිවෙත් බොහෝ විවේචනවලට ලක් වුණා. සිවිල් සමාජ රියාකාරිකයන් උද්ඝෝෂණවලට දක්ෂ වුවත් රාජ් පාලනයට අසමත්ද?

එබඳු හැඟීමක් සමහරුන් තුළ ජනිත කරන්නට ආමි ආද්මියේ දිල්ලි ක‍්‍රියා කලාපය හේතු වුණා. මෙය කනගාටුදායකයි. දිගු කලක් තිස්සේ වීදි බැස උද්ඝෝෂණය කළ පිරිසකට අන්තිමේදී ඡන්දයෙන් පාලන බලය ලැබුණු විට ඔවුන් ඉක්මනින් තම භූමිකාව වෙනස් කර ගත යුතුයි.

රාජ්‍ය පාලනය කිරීමේදී නිලධාරීන්, පොලිසිය, ව්‍යාපාරිකයන් ඇතුළු නොයෙකුත් පිරිස් සමග සහයෝගයෙන් වැඩ කරන්නට වනවා. ආමි ආද්මි පක්ෂය දිල්ලියේ පාලනයට පත්වූ විට එය හරිහැටි කරගෙන යෑමට අවශ්‍ය විනය හා සංවිධාන ශක්තිය ඔවුන් සතුවූයේ නැහැ. ඔවුන්ගේ සමාජ දැක්ම, අවංකබව හා කැපවීම ඉතා හොඳින් තිබුණත් නව වගකීම් සමුදායට අනුගත වීමට ඔවුන් අසමත් වුණා.

anna-hazare-gandhi-funny-cartoon

ඉන්දියාවට වඩා විශාලත්වයෙන් මෙන්ම විවිධත්වයෙන් බෙහෙවින් කුඩා වූ රී ලංකාවට මේ අත්දැකීම් අප කෙසේ අදාළ කර ගත යුතුද? මෙරට සිවිල් සමාජ රියාකාරිකයන් දේශපාලන අවකාශයට කෙසේ නම් පිවිසිය යුතුද?

පළමුවැන්න නම් සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් ඍජුවම දේශපාලන නායකයන්, ජනතා ඡන්දයෙන් පත් වූ නියෝජිතයන් නිතර මුණ ගැසී තම ස්ථාවරයන් හා ප‍්‍රශ්න පැහැදිලිව සන්නිවේදනය කොට සංවාද කළ යුතුයි. හැම දේශපාලන පක්ෂයකම පාහේ න්‍යායචාර්යවරුන් සිටිනවා. ඔවුන් සමගත් බුද්ධිමය සංවාදයක් ගොඩ නගා ගත යුතුයි. ඔබ ඔවුන්ට මුළුමනින්ම විරුද්ධ මත දැරුවත් ඔවුන් සමග සංවාද කිරීම ඉතා වැදගත්.

මෙහිදී ස්වාධීන හා සක‍්‍රිය මාධ්‍ය පැවතීම තීරණාත්මකයි. බොහෝ විට සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් පවත්නා රජයන්ට කියන දේ, කරන බලපෑම් ගැන මහජන මතයක් ඇති කළ හැක්කේ මාධ්‍ය ආවරණය හරහායි. ජනතා ව්‍යාපාර හා සිවිල් සමාජ අරගලයන් ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති හා නීති දක්වා යන දුෂ්කර ගමනේදී මාධ්‍යවලින් ලැබෙන දායකත්වය ඉන්දියාවේ අතිශය වැදගත්. අනෙක් අතට ජනතාවගේ ප‍්‍රශ්න හා ප‍්‍රමුඛතා මොනවාද යන්න හඳුනා ගන්නට මාධ්‍යවලට බෙහෙවින් උපකාරවන්නේ සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන්. ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ මේ සබඳතාව වඩාත් ප‍්‍රශස්ත කරගත හැකි නම් දෙපිරිසටම එය ප‍්‍රයෝජනවත් වනු ඇති.

දෙවැන්න නම් දේශපාලකයන් මුහුණ දෙන ප‍්‍රායෝගික දුෂ්කරතා හා ඔවුන්ට ඇති සීමාවන් ගැන සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් මීට වඩා සංවේදී වීමද අවශ්‍ය යැයි මා සිතනවා.

තොරතුරු දැන ගැනීමේ අයිතිය (Right to Information Act) නීතියෙන් තහවුරු වී ඉන්දියාවේ දැන් දශකයක් පමණ කල් ගත වී තිබෙනවා. පුරවැසි හා සිවිල් සමාජ රියාකාරීත්වයට හා යහපාලනයට මෙය දායක වී ඇත්තේ කෙසේද?

ඉන්දියාවෙත් ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවෙත් බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය පාලන සමයේ හඳුන්වා දුන් රාජ්‍ය රහස් පිළිබඳ නීති (official secret laws) එක සමානයි. බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය රාජ්‍ය පාලකයන්ට ඕනෑ වුණේ හැකි තරම් රජයේ තීරණ, ප‍්‍රතිපාදන හා වියදම් රටවැසියන්ගෙන් වසන් කොට තැබීමට. තොරතුරු දැනගැනීමේ අයිතිය නීතිගත කිරීම හරහා රාජ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති, වැඩපිළිවෙළ, මූල්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිපාදන, වියදම් හා වෙනත් රාජ්‍ය පාලන ක‍්‍රියාකාරකම් ගැන විස්තරාත්මක තොරතුරු ඉල්ලා සිටීමේ වරම පුරවැසියන්ට ලැබෙනවා.

ඉන්දියාවේ මෙය නීතියක් ලෙස 2005දී ලබා දෙන්නට පෙර වසර ගණනාවක් සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධාන හා ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් ඉතා ඕනෑකමින් ඒ සඳහා ජනමතයක් ගොඩ නැගුවා. එය නීතිගත වූ පසුවද එහි නිසි ක‍්‍රියාකාරීත්වය හා නිසි ඵල නෙලා ගැනීම තහවුරු කර ගන්නට සිවිල් සමාජ දායකත්වය ඉතා ඉහළයි.

මධ්‍යම තොරතුරු කොමිසමක් (Central Information Commission, CIC) ස්ථාපිත කරනු ලැබුවා. රාජ්‍ය ආයතනයකට තොරතුරු ඉල්ලීමක් කොට නිසි ප‍්‍රතිචාර නිසි කාල සීමාව තුළ නොලදහොත් එය ගැන පැමිණිලි කිරීමට හා මැදිහත්වීමට මේ කොමිසමට පූර්ණ බලතල තිබෙනවා. මුලදී තොරතුරු කොමසාරිස්වරුන් සියල්ලන්ම පරිපාලන සේවා නිලධාරීන් වුවත් දැන් ක‍්‍රමයෙන් කොමිසමට නීතිවේදීන් හා සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන්ද පත්ව සිටිනවා.

අපේ වැදගත්ම පාඩම නම් තොරතුරු දැනගැනීමේ අයිතිය නීතිගත වීම පමණක් නොසෑහෙන බවයි. එය ප‍්‍රායෝගිකව සාක්ෂාත් කර ගැනීමට නිරන්තර සිවිල් සමාජ සහභාගිත්වය, අවදියෙන් සිටීම හා අධීක්ෂණය ඉතා වැදගත්.

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene: Young Asia Television - The Interview, June 2014

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene: Young Asia Television – The Interview, June 2014

තොරතුරු අයිතිය නීතිගත වීම සාමාන් ඉන්දියානු පුරවැසියාට බලපෑවේ කෙසේද?

මෙතෙක් නොයෙක් නිදහසට කාරණා දක්වමින් මහජනයාට නිලධාරිවාදී කඩතුරාවකින් වසන් කරගෙන සිටි රාජ්‍ය පාලන ක‍්‍රියාකාරීත්වය ප‍්‍රථම වතාවට නිල වශයෙන්ම විවෘත වූවා (open government).

මෙය හුදෙක් මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ට පමණක් සීමාවූ අයිතියක් නොවෙයි. බිලියන් 1.2ක් වන සියලූම ඉන්දියානුවන්ට අද මධ්‍යම, ප‍්‍රාන්ත හෝ ප‍්‍රාදේශීය මට්ටමේ රාජ්‍ය තන්ත‍්‍රයේ බොහෝ පැතිකඩ ගැන තොරතුරු දින 30ක් ඇතුළත ලබා ගැනීමේ නීතිමය අයිතිය තිබෙනවා. ජනතාවට වග කියන රාජ්‍ය පාලනයක් (accountable government) ඇති කිරීමට නම් අනවශ්‍ය රහසිගත බව පසෙක ලා මෙසේ පාරදෘශ්‍යවීම ශිෂ්ට සමාජයකට අත්‍යවශ්‍යයි.

තොරතුරු ලබාගැනීමේ හැකියාව තහවුරුවීමත් සමග තොරතුරු විග‍්‍රහ කිරීම, සාවද්‍ය තැන් හඳුනා ගැනීම, හේතු විමසීම හා සංකීර්ණ ආකාරයේ අක‍්‍රමිකතා හෝ දුෂණ සොයා යෑම ආදී කුසලතා ඉන්දීය සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් ප‍්‍රගුණ කොට තිබෙනවා. තොරතුරු නීතිය ලැබුණාට මදි. එයින් ඵල නෙළා ගන්නටත් හැකි විය යුතුයි.

රජාතන්තරවාදයේ නියම අරුතත් එයම නේද?

ඇත්තටම ඔව්. වඩාත් සහභාගිත්ව ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයක් (participatory democracy) ඒ හරහා ඉන්දියාවේ මතු වෙමින් තිබෙනවා. දුෂිත හෝ අකාර්යක්ෂම දේශපාලකයන් හා නිලධාරීන් මෙයට නොකැමැති වුවත්, අවංක හා සේවයට කැප වූවන්ට මේ තොරතුරු නීතිය හිතකරයි.

සමහර ඉන්දීය ප‍්‍රාන්තවල තොරතුරු නීතිය වඩාත් හොඳින් සාක්ෂාත් කරගෙන තිබෙනවා. එබඳු ප‍්‍රාන්තවල දැන් දේශපාලන අවකාශය හා සිවිල් අවකාශය අතර සබඳතා සවිමත් කරන යහපාලමක් ලෙස තොරතුරු නීතිය ක‍්‍රියා කරනවා.

සමහර පසුගාමී ප‍්‍රාන්තවල මෙය තවමත් සිදුව නැහැ. (ඉන්දියාව කියන්නේ සංකීර්ණ හා බහුවිධ තත්ත්වයන් පවතින රටක්.) නමුත් පොදුවේ ගත් විට තොරතුරු අයිතිය නීතිගත වීම හා එය තහවුරු කර ගැනීම හරහා ඉන්දීය ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ ගුණාත්මක බව මූලධර්මීය මට්ටමෙන්ම දියුණු වෙමින් තිබෙන බව නම් පැහැදිලියි.

නමුත් තවත් යා යුතු දුර බොහෝයි?

ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය කියන්නේ නිරතුරුව වෙහෙස මහන්සියෙන් නඩත්තු කිරීම් කළ යුතු සමාජ සංසිද්ධියක්. එය කිසි දිනෙක හමාරයි පරිපූර්නයි කියා අපට විරාම ගන්නට බැහැ!

තොරතුරු අයිතිය නීතිගත වීම හරහා ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය නඩත්තුවට අමතර මෙවලම් හා අවකාශයන් ඉන්දීය අපට විවෘත වුණා. එය පදනම් කර ගෙන පොදු උන්නතියට අවශ්‍ය සංවාද කිරීම හා හිතකර ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති වෙත යොමු වීම දේශපාලකයන්, නිලධාරීන් හා සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් සියලූ දෙනාටම තිබෙන අභියෝගයක්.

ආචාර්ය ටැන්ඩන්, ඔබේ දැක්ම හා අත්දැකීම් රී ලංකාවේ අපට මාහැඟි ආදර්ශයක් හා රබෝධක ආවේගයක් සපයනවා. ඔබට බෙහෙවින් ස්තුතියි!

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #206: ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයේ සිවිල් සමාජ සාධකය ඉන්දියානු ඇසින්

Citizens' vigil for murdered and disappeared Lankan journalists: 5 January 2015 at Vihara Maha Devi Park, Colombo.

Citizens’ vigil for murdered and disappeared Lankan journalists: 5 January 2015 at Vihara Maha Devi Park, Colombo.

Civil society – in its widest sense – played a key role in the recent peaceful change of government in Sri Lanka. It was civil society advocacy – for ending corruption, ensuring independence of judiciary, and increasing democratic checks and balances on the executive presidency – that inspired a larger citizen demand for better governance. The parliamentary opposition was pushed into belated action by these citizen demands.

What is the role of civil society in the political process? How and where does the civil space intersect with the political space? How can civil society engage formal political parties without being subsumed or co-opted?

In June 2014, I posed these questions to Dr Rajesh Tandon of India, an internationally acclaimed leader and practitioner of participatory research and development, when I interviewed him for Young Asia Television (YATV) – I was just ‘standing in’ for the regular host Sanjana Hattotuwa.

That interview’s contents are now more relevant to Sri Lanka than 8 months ago. So I have just rendered it into Sinhala. In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala), I share the first half of the interview. To be continued next week…

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene: Young Asia Television - The Interview, June 2014

Dr Rajesh Tandon (left) in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene: Young Asia Television – The Interview, June 2014

සිවිල් සමාජය (civil society) පුළුල් සංකල්පයක්. ප‍්‍රජා මට්ටමේ සමිති සමාගම්වල සිට වඩාත් විධිමත් රාජ්‍ය නොවන සංවිධාන මෙන්ම වෘත්තීය සමිති, වෘත්තිකයන්ගේ සංවිධාන හා ජාලයන් සියල්ල සිවිල් සමාජය ගණයට අයත්.

සිවිල් සමාජයේ දේශපාලන සහභාගිත්වය කෙසේ විය යුතුද? පුරවැසියන්ගෙන් සැදුම් ලත්, පුරවැසි අපේක්ෂාව වටා සංවිධාන ගත වන සිවිල් සමාජය ඕනෑම ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී රටක යහපාලනය සඳහා ඉතා වැදගත් කාර්යයන් සමුදායක් ඉටු කරනවා.

දේශපාලන ක‍්‍රියාදාමය තනිකරම දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට ඉතිරි කොට සිවිල් සමාජය සමාජ සුබ සාධනයට පමණක් සීමා විය යුතු යැයි පටු තර්කයක් ගෙවී ගිය අඳුරු දශකයේ මෙරට ප‍්‍රවර්ධනය කරනු ලැබුවා. එහෙත් 2015 ජනාධිපතිවරණයේ තීරණාත්මක වෙනස උදෙසා සිවිල් සමාජ දායකත්වය අති විශාලයි. හිටපු රජය එපා කියද්දීත්, තහංචි හා හිරිහැර මැද්දෙන් සිවිල් සමාජය ගත් යහපාලන ස්ථාවරයන් අනුමත කරන්නට හා අනුකරණය කරන්නට දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට සිදු වුණා.

මෙය අපට පමණක් සීමා වූ අත්දැකීමක් නොවෙයි. වඩාත් පරිණත ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයක් පවතින ඉන්දියාවේ මේ ගැන පුළුල් අත්දැකීම් තිබෙනවා. 2014 ජුනි මාසයේ ඒ ගැන මා එරට ප‍්‍රවීණතම සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයකු හා සහභාගිත්ව සංවර්ධනය ගැන ලොව පිළිගත් විද්වතකු වන ආචාර්ය රාජේෂ් ටැන්ඩන් (Dr Rajesh Tandon) සමග දීර්ඝ ටෙලිවිෂන් සාකච්ඡාවක් කළා.

ඉංජිනේරු හා කළමනාකරණ උපාධි සතු වුවත් ඔහු ගෙවී ගිය වසර 35 කැප කොට ඇත්තේ නියෝජිත ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදය නූතන ලෝකයේ අභියෝගවලට මුහුණදීමට හැකි පරිදි වඩාත් සහභාගිත්ව රාමුවකට ගෙන ඒමටයි. ඉන්දියාවේ සිවිල් සමාජ ආයතන හා ජාල ගණනාවක නායකත්වයට අමතරව පුරවැසි සහභාගිත්වය සඳහා ලෝක සන්ධානයේ (CIVICUS) පාලක මණ්ඩල සභිකයකු ද වන ඔහු කොළඹට පැමිණි මොහොතක YATV සාකච්ඡාවකට මා සමග එකතු වුණා.

මාස කිහිපයකට පසු එහි සිංහල අනුවාදය ඔබට ගෙන එන්නේ මෙරට අඳුරු දශකයක නිමාවෙන් පසු යහපාලනයේ පැතුම් යළිත් දැල්වෙමින් තිබෙන මොහොතක එයට යම් ජවයක් ඉන්දියාවෙන් ලද හැකියැ’යි මා විශ්වාස කරන නිසා.

Dr Rajesh Tandon

Dr Rajesh Tandon

නාලක: කොළඹදී ඔබ කළ දේශනයේ ඔබ පෙන්වා දුන්නා පොදු උන්නතිය සඳහා රියා කළ හැකි අවකාශයන් දෙකක් ඇති බව. එකක් දේශපාලන අවකාශය (political space). අනෙක සිවිල් අවකාශය (civil space). මේ දෙක එකිනෙකට මුණ ගැසෙන්නේ කෙලෙසද?

රාජේෂ් ටැන්ඩන්: මගේ ජීවිත කාලය පුරාම සිවිල් සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරී ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයේ මා නිතරව සිටිනවා. ඉන්දියාවේ මෙන්ම ගෝලීය වශයෙන්. අප නිතර මෙනෙහි කරන ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් නම් දේශපාලන ක‍්‍රියාදාමයට හරියාකාර බලපෑම් කරන්නේ කෙසේද යන්නයි.

අසම්පූර්ණතා ඇතත්, ඉන්දියාවේ දේශපාලන ක‍්‍රියාදාමය ප‍්‍රජාතාන්ත‍්‍රික රාමුවක් තුළ සිදු වනවා. ජාතික, ප‍්‍රාන්ත හා ප‍්‍රාදේශීය (පළාත්පාලන) යන මට්ටම් තුනක් අපට තිබෙනවා. ඉන්දියාවේ පුළුල් වූත්, සංවිධානාත්මක වූත් සිවිල් සමාජයේ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් මේ මට්ටම් තුනේම ජනතා නියෝජිතයන් (ඡන්දයෙන් තේරී පත් වූවන්) සමග ඍජුව මෙන්ම මාධ්‍ය හරහාත් නිරතුරු සංවාදයක යෙදෙනවා.

සමහර සිවිල් සමාජ ක්රියාකාරිකයන් ඡන්දවලටත් තරග කරනවාද?

ජාතික හා ප‍්‍රාන්ත මට්ටමේ දේශපාලනයට අවතීර්ණවීමට නම් දේශපාලන පක්ෂයකට බැඳී ඒ හරහා නාමයෝජනා ලැබ මැතිවරණ ජය ගත යුතුයි. එහෙත් නගර සභා හා පංචයාත් (ප‍්‍රාදේශීය සභා) මට්ටමේ නම් තවමත් දේශපාලන පක්ෂයකට නොබැඳුණු අයටත් තරග කිරීමට හා තේරී පත්වීමට යම් ඉඩක් තිබෙනවා. ජන සංවිධාන නියෝජිතයෝ බොහෝ විට එම මට්ටමේ තරග කොට පළාත් පාලන දේශපාලන අවකාශයට ද පිවිසී පොදු උන්නතිය උදෙසා දිගටම ක‍්‍රියා කරනවා. එහෙත් අපට තිබෙන ලොකු අභියෝගයක් නම් ප‍්‍රාන්ත හා ජාතික මට්ටමේදී සිවිල් සමාජ ප‍්‍රමුඛතා හා දැක්මට දේශපාලන පක්ෂ කෙසේ නම්මවා ගත හැකි ද යන්නයි.

ඔබ සිතන්නේ රේල් පීලි මෙන් දේශපාලන අවකාශය හා සිවිල් අවකාශය සමාන්තරව දිවෙන බවද? නැත්නම් මේවා එකිනෙක හමු වනවාද?

මේ අවකාශ දෙක විටින් විට හමු වනවා. 2014 අපේ‍්‍රල්-මැයි ඉන්දියානු මහ මැතිවරණයේදීත් මෙය සිදු වුණා. උදාහරණයකට මා අයිති එක් සිවිල් ක‍්‍රියාකාරික පිරිසක් නාගරික දුගී ජනයාගේ අයිතීන් වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටිනවා. මැතිවරණ කැම්පේන් කාලයේ අප ප‍්‍රධාන නාගරික ප‍්‍රදේශවල සියලූ දේශපාලන පක්ෂවල ඡන්ද අපේක්ෂකයන් හමු වී අපේ දැක්ම පහදා දුන්නා. ඔවුන්ගේ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රකාශනවල අඩුපාඩු පෙන්වා දුන්නා. පරිසරවේදීන්, කාන්තා අයිතිවාසිකම් කණ්ඩායම් හා වෙනත් පොදු ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන පෙනී සිටින සිවිල් කණ්ඩායම් ද මෙවැනිම සංවාදවල යෙදෙනවා. ඔවුන් අතර රාජ්‍ය නොවන සංවිධාන, වෘත්තීය සමිති, වෘත්තීයවේදීන්ගේ සංවිධාන හා ග‍්‍රාමීය ප‍්‍රජා කණ්ඩායම් සිටිනවා.

Dec 2012: People gather at a candlelit vigil for the rape victim - Photo by Saurabh Das, AP

Dec 2012: People gather at a candlelit vigil for the rape victim – Photo by Saurabh Das, AP

මෑතදී නව රවණතාවක් මතුව තිබෙන බව ඔබ පෙන්වා දුන්නා. දුෂණය, ස්තරී හිංසනය ආදී බරපතළ සමාජ රශ්නවලට එරෙහිව විශේෂයෙන් මධ්යම පාන්තික ඉන්දියානුවන් පෙළගැසෙනු හා වීදි බැස උද්ඝෝෂණය කරනු අප දකිනවා. ජංගම දුරකතන හරහා කඩිනමින් සංවිධානගත වන ඔවුන් බොහෝ දෙනා සාම්පරදායික සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධානවලට අයත් නැහැ නේද?

මෙය ගෙවී ගිය වසර හත අට තුළ අප දකින ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. අන්නා හසාරේ (Anna Hazare) ජන නායකයා වටා ඒකරාශි වෙමින් දුෂණයට එරෙහිව හඬ නැගුවේ බොහෝ කොටම මෙබඳු අයයි. මා මෙය දකින්නේ 1990 ගණන්වල උපන් ඉන්දියානුවන් සමාජ ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන ආවේගයෙන් එළි බැසීමක් ලෙසටයි. මෙය මා වැන්නවුන් මවිතයට පත් කළත් එය හිතකර ප‍්‍රවණතාවක් ලෙස මා දකිනවා.

මෑතක් වන තුරු ඉන්දියාවේ නාගරික ඉසුරුබර උදවියගේ දේශපාලන සහභාගිත්වය ඉතා අඩු මට්ටමක පැවතියා. මැතිවරණවලදී ඡන්දය දීමට වැඩිපුර ගියේ නාගරික දුගී හා පහළ මධ්‍යම පාන්තිකයන් (65%). බොහෝ ඉහළ මධ්‍යම පාන්තිකයන් ඡන්දය දීමටවත් ගියේ නැහැ (10%).

ජාතික මට්ටමේ මහ මැතිවරණවලදී පවා?

ඔව්. පළාත් පාලන මැතිවරණ ගැන නම් මේ පිරිස පොඩියක්වත් තැකීමක් කළේ නැහැ. එහෙත් 2008 පමණ පටන් මෙය වෙනස් වන්නට පටන් අරන්. එය යම් තරමකට අප 2009 මහ මැතිවරණයේදී දුටුවා. එය වඩාත් හොඳින් පෙනී ගියේ 2014 මහ මැතිවරණයේදී.

මේ ස්වයංසිද්ධ ප‍්‍රවණතාවට උත්පේ‍්‍රරණය හා ගැම්ම ලබා දෙන්නේ පුවත් ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා, ජංගම දුරකතන ව්‍යාප්තිය, ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය පුළුල්වීම ආදී සාධකයි. මේ තාක්ෂණික සාධක මගින් පුරවැසියන් තුළ නව පිබිදීමක් හා කැක්කුමක් ඇති කොට තිබෙනවා.

සමාජය වෙලා ගත් ගනඳුරු පටල වැනි දුෂණය, ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය ආදියට එරෙහි විය හැකි බවත්, තත්ත්වය ගොඩ ගත නොහැකි තරම් අසාධ්‍ය නොවන බවත් තරුණ ඡන්දදායකයන් සිතන්නට පෙළඹිලා. නිලධාරීන් හෝ දේශපාලකයන් පසුපස ගොස්, ඔවුන්ට බැගෑපත් වී, ඔවුන් සතුටු කොට පුරවැසි වරප‍්‍රසාද ලබා ගැනීමේ දීනත්වය වෙනුවට ආත්ම අභිමානය සහිතව ජීවත් විය හැකි හෙට දවසක් ගැන ඔවුන් බලාපොරොත්තු ඇති කරගෙන සිටිනවා.

 

Anti-corruption activist Anna Hazare

Anti-corruption activist Anna Hazare

මෙය නගරවල පමණක්ද? නැත්නම් රාමීය රදේශවලත් දැකිය හැකි පිබිදීමක්ද?

දැන් මෙය ගම් ප‍්‍රදේශවලටත් පැතිරිලා. මෙයට ප‍්‍රධාන හේතුව මාධ්‍ය ව්‍යාප්තියයි. ගෙවී ගිය දශකය තුළ ඉන්දියාව පුරාම පුවත් පමණක් ආවරණය කරන ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා සිය ගණනක් බිහි වුණා. මේ නාලිකා අපේ භාෂා දුසිම් ගණනකින් සමාජගත වනවා. පැය 24 පුරාම සමාජ, ආර්ථික හා දේශපාලන ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන සජීව වාද විවාද කරනවා.

1990 මුල කාලයේ උපන්, 2010 වනවිට ඡුන්දය දීමේ වයසට ළඟාවූ මිලියන ගණන් තරුණ තරුණියන් හැදුණේ වැඩුණේ මේ බහුමාධ්‍ය වාතාවරණය තුළයි. ජංගම දුරකතන බිලියනයකට ආසන්න සංඛ්‍යාවක් රට තුළ ව්‍යාප්ත වීම හා ඒවා භාවිතයේ වියදම ඉතා අඩු වීම හරහා ද තොරතුරු ගලායෑමට පෙර යුගවල තිබූ බාධක බොහෝ කොට බිඳ වැටිලා.

ඔබ කියන්නේ මාධ් හා තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණය එක පසෙකිනුත්, අතිවිශාල තරුණ හා උගත් ජනසංඛ්යාවක් තව පසෙකිනුත් මතු වීම හරහා ඉන්දීය සමාජයේ මේ නව රජාතාන්තරික පිබිදීම සිදුව ඇති බවයි?

ඔව්. ඇත්තටම ඔව්!

මේ සාධක දෙක සමාපත වූ මැදපෙරදිග සමහර රටවල අරාබි වසන්තය නම් ජන අරගල මතු වුණා. එහෙත් ඉන්දියාවේ එබන්දක් සිදු වුණේ නැහැ. වෙනුවට පොදු මිනිසාගේ පක්ෂය ආමි ආද්මි (Aam Aadmi Party, AAP) මතු වුණා. මේ වෙනසට හේතුව කුමක්ද?

ජන සංයුතිය (demographics) මෙහිදී ඉතා වැදගත් සාධකයක්. ඉන්දියාවේ ජනගහනයේ මධ්‍යන්‍ය වයස 24යි. ඒ කියන්නේ අපේ සමස්ත ජනගහනය වන මිලියන් 1,200න් බාගයක්ම (මිලියන් 600ක්) වයස 24 හෝ ඊට අඩුයි. මේ මහා තරුණ ජනකාය තමන්ගේ ආවේගයන් කෙළින්ම පොදු අවකාශයේ (වීදි බැස සාමකාමී උද්ඝෝෂණ කිරීමෙන්) හෝ සයිබර් අවකාශයේ ප‍්‍රකාශ කරනවා. මෙය පෙර කිසිදා නොතිබි අන්දමේ තත්ත්වයක්.

මෙය මා දකින්නේ අතරමැදි (දේශපාලන හෝ සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධාන) හරහා නොගොස් ඍජුව පුරවැසියන් රාජ්‍ය පාලකයන්ට බලපෑම් කිරීමේ නව රටාවක් ලෙසයි.

පරම්පරාවකට පෙර මෙබඳු තරුණ උදවිය දේශපාලන පක්ෂවලට හෝ සිවිල් සමාජ සංවිධානවලට හෝ බැඳී ක‍්‍රියා කළා. අද බොහෝ කොට ඔවුන් ඍජුවම එය කරනවා. දුෂණ විරෝධී ජන රැල්ල හා දිල්ලියේ ස්ත‍්‍රී දුෂණයට එරෙහිව ඉන්දියාව පුරාම මතුව ආ ජන රැල්ල මෙයට මෑත උදාහරණයි. එහිදී වීදි බැස නීතිය ක‍්‍රියාත්මක කිරීමට බලකර සිටි තරුණ පිරිස් අගමැති හා ස්වදේශ ඇමතිට කෙළින්ම පණිවුඩයක් දුන්නා.

එසේම ජාතික ප‍්‍රශ්න ගැන වීදියට බසින තරුණ තරුණියෝ කෙළින්ම රට කරවන ඇත්තන්ට එහි එන්නයැ’යි බල කොට කියනවා. පොලිස්පති හෝ ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරීන් හෝ පැමිණියාට ඔවුන්ට මදි.

Anna Hazare

එසේ රසිද්ධ ස්ථානවලට පැමිණීම දේශපාලන නායකයන්ගේ ආරක්ෂාවට තර්ජනයක් විය හැකිද?

ඒ තර්කය විවාදාත්මකයි. තරුණ උද්ඝෝෂණකරුවන් කියන්නේ මේ අගමැති, ඇමති පිරිස පත්ව සිටින්නේ මහජන ඡුන්දයෙන්. ඔවුන් නඩත්තු කරන්නේ මහජන මුදලින්. ඉතින් එම මහජනයාගේ පිරිසක් හමුවීමට දේශපාලන නායකයන්ට එන්න බැරිද?

එසේම කමාන්ඩෝ ආරක්ෂකයන් පිරිවරා ගෙන වාහන දහය විස්සක රථ පෙරහරින් දේශපාලකයන් එහා මෙහා යාම ඉන්දියාවේ තරුණ පිරිස් රුස්සන්නේ නැහැ. ඔවුන් කියන්නේ ජනතාවට ඔයිට වඩා සමීප වන්න බැරි නම්, බය නම් ලොකු ලොක්කෝ දේශපාලනයෙන් ඉවත් විය යුතු බවයි!

ඉන්දියාවේ 2014 මහ මැතිවරණයේදී රථම වතාවට ඡන්දය දීමේ වයසට ළඟා වූ තරුණ තරුණියන් මිලියන් 150ක් පමණ සිටියා. මේ පිරිස වඩා උගත්, තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණයෙන් සන්නද්ධ වූවන් වීම මැතිවරණ රතිඵලයට බලපෑවේ කෙසේද?

ඉන්දියාවේ ජාතික සාක්ෂරතාව 74%ක් වුවත් වයස 24ට අඩු ජන කොටස අතර එය 90%ක් තරම් ඉහළයි. මේ අය අඩු තරමින් වසර 10-12ක් පාසල් ගිය තොරතුරු ලැබීමේ හා හුවමාරුවේ අගය දත් පිරිසක්. මීට පෙර පරම්පරා මෙන් දේශපාලකයන් කරන කියන ඕනෑම දෙයක් ඉවසා සිටින්නට ඔවුන් සූදානම් නැහැ.

සාකච්ඡාව වෙබ් හරහා බලන්න – https://vimeo.com/118544161

ඉතිරි කොටස ලබන සතියේඉන්දියාවේ අත්දැකීම් රී ලංකාවට අප කෙසේ අදාළ කර ගත යුතුද?

Posted in Broadcasting, Corruption, Digital Natives, Education, Global South, good governance, ICT, India, Internet, Media activism, Media freedom, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, South Asia, urban issues, youth. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Vigil for Lasantha: Challenges of keeping the flame alive

Too little, too late? Civil society candlelight vigil for Lasantha Wickramatunga

Too little, too late? Civil society candlelight vigil for Lasantha Wickramatunga

This evening, I quietly crossed a personal threshold. For the first time in my 42 years, I joined a street protest: a candlelight vigil for the slain newspaper editor and investigative journalist Lasantha Wickramatunga.

As I have explained elsewhere: “I’m strongly committed to promoting media freedom, but have never been the placard-carrying, slogan-shouting type. Street activism is necessary — but not sufficient. I’ve been more interested in studying trends and conditions, trying to anticipate what the next big threats, challenges and opportunities are, and how best we can respond to them.”

So I went to the vigil more for Lasantha the person and less for any organised effort. The invitation I received by SMS and email from several sources asked us to gather outside Colombo’s Vihara Maha Devi (formerly Victoria) Park at 5.15 pm. It was going to be a ‘joint civil society protest’ against Lasantha’s killing and the erosion of media freedom, democracy and human rights.

It turned out to be a well-intended but poorly-planned event lacking in vision and dynamism, perhaps a bit like our (very) civil society entities themselves. The couple of hundred people who joined it came mainly from Colombo’s high society, the ones who faithfully lapped up every word that Lasantha churned out week after week for nearly 15 years. Ironically, Lasantha and his newspaper were only loosely associated with this kind of (very) civil society – fellow companions on a shared journey, but not necessarily agreeing on priorities or strategies.

Missing from this gathering were the ordinary people and the grassroots end of the civil society spectrum – the ones who are bearing the brunt of our mismanaged economy, pervasive corruption and decaying public institutions. Some of these people turned up on their own initiative at Lasantha’s funeral service and/or the funeral itself, even if the latter event was shamefully hijacked by opportunistic political parties. (As one blogger noted, politicians of all colours and hue love dead bodies.)

I remembered the battered face of an old lady who sat through the entire funeral service – and then left quietly, without even lining up with the rest of the crowd to take one last look at Lasantha as he lay amidst flowers. I remembered the handful of men and women dressed in bright coloured clothes – standing out amidst the sea of white or black clad people – who I later found out came from the Kotahena area and were part of Lasantha’s home town church.

Lighting candles was good. Keeping the flame alive is harder...

Lighting candles was good. Keeping the flame alive is harder...


No one had sent SMS or emails asking them to turn up. Some of them might not have been readers of English newspapers, which circulate among a numerically small but socially and economically influential section of Lankan society. They came because they felt the fallen man had stood up and spoken out for them.

In comparison, the candlelight vigil was decidedly upmarket. Nothing wrong in that, for the chattering class is very much part of our society and have the same rights to dissent and protest. In some countries, the upper middle class even provides vision, articulation and leadership to mass struggles. Ours, sadly, is more characterised by part-time activists who move more in the cocktail circuits grumbling about everything yet doing precious little to change the status quo. Indeed, some of them in their day jobs benefit personally from the prevailing corruption and nepotism, no matter which political party is in office.

The vigil’s organisers – it wasn’t clear who exactly they were – had painstakingly got the material ready: a large painting of Lasantha, black cloth bands and, of course, candles. But they hadn’t given enough thought to the location. We initially gathered and spent over half an hour on a stretch of road (Green Path) where only motorists passed by, but absolutely no pedestrians. Then someone thought of moving to the nearby roundabout which was a more visible, strategic location.

Not perfect, but better. By then, dusk was beginning to fall. We moved unhurriedly, chatting among ourselves, and slowly converged on a wide pavement. There, one by one, we started planting our candles on the ground in front of Lasantha’s picture. It was a moving moment captured in many still cameras and a handful of video cameras.

There we lingered for another hour or more, chatting with each other — and not necessarily about the lofty or somber matters. I was glad to catch up with several friends or associates active in artistic, journalistic or intellectual circles. I saw everybody else doing the same.

One of them, a human rights activist now turned peacenik, asked me many eager questions about blogging. A columnist for an English daily, he isn’t active online and his organisation is notably inept when it comes to mobilising the web for their cause. In his early 50s, he evidently hasn’t crossed what I call the Other Digital Divide. And he typifies the face of our organised civil society – a motley collection of do-gooders who are liberal, mostly secular, passionate yet largely ineffective in their advocacy for reform and change. They just can’t mobilise people power.

Candles burn out, but the image captured will live for longer...

Candles burn out, but the image captured will live for longer...


Admittedly, it’s a quantum leap from the one-way street in op ed pages of mainstream print newspapers to the far less orderly, sometimes near-anarchic and often unpredictable world of the blogosphere. This might explain why a majority of Lankan civil society groups stay within their comfort zone and don’t engage the world of web 2.0

On the other hand, the younger, digitally-empowered activists who engage the web with technical savvy and passion are often too impatient or inexperienced (or both) with the necessarily tedious processes of institutional development – such as legal registration, financial management and putting in place mechanisms for the very ideals they advocate in governments and corporations: proper governance and accountability.

Fortunately, this offline/online divide is blurring, even if only slowly. Groups like Beyond Borders, which originated and found their feet in the new media world, are becoming more institutionalised. If they sustain themselves (and don’t lose their sharp edge), they can bridge the online world with the offline realities and needs.

Meanwhile, as some doggedly persistent citizen journalists and new media activists have shown in the days following Lasantha’s killing, it is now possible to stir up public discussion and debate on issues of rights, freedoms and democracy using dynamic websites, blogs, online video and other tools of web 2.0. See, for example, this reflection by the Editor of Groundviews.

Whether they are active online or offline, committed activists in Sri Lanka have their work cut out for them. If the candlelight vigil for Lasantha is an indication, far more work needs to be done in strategy, unity, networking and technology choices. The old order needs to pause, reflect and change their ways. If they can’t or won’t, at a minimum they must get out of the way. (Remember what happened to those dinosaur species that were vegetarian and harmless? They too went the way of T rex…)

Earlier on in the evening, as we were heading to the roundabout with burning candles in our hands, the wind suddenly picked up. Many of us struggled to keep the flame burning, sometimes shielding it with one palm. It wasn’t quite easy to do this while walking forward, watching our step. Amidst all this, we lost sense of where we were heading. We just followed those immediately in front of us, unsure who – if anyone – was leading. Not smart or strategic.

As I drove home, I realised how symbolic that candle-in-the-wind moment had been. Keeping the flames of truth, justice and fairness alive is hard enough. It becomes that much harder when winds of tribalism threaten to snuff it out. And in the thickening darkness, how do we make sure we are headed in the right direction?

The night is young and storm clouds are still gathering. We have miles to go before we can sleep.

Related posts:
August 2007: People Power: Going beyond elections and revolutions
November 2007: True people’s power needed to fight climate change
November 2007: Protect journalists who fight for social and environmental justice!