Sri Lanka State of the Media Report’s Tamil version released in Jaffna

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Rebuilding Public Trust: Tamil version copies displayed at the launch in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

Journalists, academics, politicians and civil society representatives joined the launch of Tamil language version of Sri Lanka’s Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report in Jaffna on 24 January 2017.

The report, titled Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka, contains 101 recommendations for media sector reforms needed at different levels – in government policies, laws and regulations, as well as within the media industry, media profession and media teaching.

The report, for which I served as overall editor, is the outcome of a 14-month-long consultative process that involved media professionals, owners, managers, academics and relevant government officials. It offers a timely analysis, accompanied by policy directions and practical recommendations.

The original report was released on World Press Freedom Day (3 May 2016) at a Colombo meeting attended by the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition and Minister of Mass Media.

The Jaffna launch event was organised by the Department of Media Studies of the University of Jaffna, the Jaffna Press Club and the National Secretariat for Media Reforms (NSMR).

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Students of Jaffna University Media Studies programme with its head, Dr S Raguram, at the launch of MDI Sri Lanka Tamil version, Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Reginald Cooray, Governor of the Northern Province, in a message said: “I am sure that the elected leaders and the policy makers of this government of Good governance will seize the opportunity to make a professionally ethical media environment in Sri Lanka which will strengthen the democracy and good governance.”

He added: “The research work should be studied, appreciated and utilised by the leaders and the policy makers. Everyone who was involved in the work should be greatly thanked for their research presentation with clarity.”

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report's Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Lars Bestle of International Media Support (IMS) speaks at Sri Lanka MDI Report’s Tamil version launch in Jaffna, 24 January 2017

Speaking at the event, Sinnadurai Thavarajah, Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Provincial Council, urged journalists to separate facts from their opinions. “Media freedom is important, but so is unbiased and balanced reporting,” he said.

Lars Bestle, Head of Department for Asia and Latin America at International Media Support (IMS), which co-published the report, said: “Creating a healthy environment for the media that is inclusive of the whole country is an essential part of ensuring democratic transition.”

He added: “This assessment points the way forward. It is now up to the local actors – government, civil society, media, businesses and academia – with support from international community, to implement its recommendations.”

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

Nalaka Gunawardene, Consultant Editor of Sri Lanka Media Development Indicators (MDI) Report, speaks at the launch of Tamil version in Jaffna on 24 Jan 2017

I introduced the report’s key findings and recommendations. In doing so, I noted how the government has welcomed those recommendations applicable to state policies, laws and regulations and already embarked on law review and regulatory reforms. In sharp contrast, there has been no reaction whatsoever from the media owners and media gatekeepers (editors).

Quote from 'Rebuilding Public Trust' - State of Sri Lanka's media report

Quote from ‘Rebuilding Public Trust’ – State of Sri Lanka’s media report

Dr S Raguram, Head of Media Studies at the University of Jaffna (who edited the Tamil version) and Jaffna Press Club president Ratnam Thayaparan also spoke.

The report comes out at a time when the country’s media industry and profession face multiple crises stemming from an overbearing state, unpredictable market forces and rapid technological advancements.

Balancing the public interest and commercial viability is one of the media sector’s biggest challenges today. The report says: “As the existing business models no longer generate sufficient income, some media have turned to peddling gossip and excessive sensationalism in the place of quality journalism. At another level, most journalists and other media workers are paid low wages which leaves them open to coercion and manipulation by persons of authority or power with an interest in swaying media coverage.”

Notwithstanding these negative trends, the report notes that there still are editors and journalists who produce professional content in the public interest while also abiding by media ethics. Unfortunately, their work is eclipsed by media content that is politically partisan and/or ethnically divisive.

The result: public trust in media has been eroded, and younger Lankans are increasingly turning to entirely web-based media products and social media platforms for information and self-expression. A major overhaul of media’s professional standards and ethics is needed to reverse these trends.

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka - Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

MDI Sri Lanka – Tamil version being presented to stakeholders in Jaffna, 24 Jan 2017

The Tamil report is available for free download at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-media-assessment-sri-lanka-tamil-language-version/

The English original report is at:

https://www.mediasupport.org/publication/rebuilding-public-trust-assessment-media-industry-profession-sri-lanka/

Read my July 2010 op-ed: [Op-ed] Major Reforms Needed to Rebuild Public Trust in Sri Lanka’s Media

Advertisements

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #263: ගරු සරු නැති විවෘත සංවාද අවකාශයක් අවශ්‍ය ඇයි?

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) & Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe at Nelum Yaya Blog awards for 2015, held on 26 March 2016

Nalaka Gunawardene (left) & Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe at Nelum Yaya Blog awards for 2015, held on 26 March 2016

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 3 April 2016), I probe why the blogosphere and other social media platforms are vital for public discourse in the Lankan context.

Sri Lanka’s mainstream media does not serve as an adequate platform for wide-ranging public discussion and debate. Besides being divided along ethnic and political lines, the media is also burdened by self-imposed restrictions where most don’t critique certain social institutions. Among the top-ranked ‘sacred cows’ are the armed forces and clergy (especially Buddhist clergy).

No such “no-go areas” for bloggers, tweeps and Facebookers. New media platforms have provided a space where irreverence can thrive: a healthy democracy badly needs such expression. I base this column partly on my remarks at the second Nelum Yaya Blog Awards ceremony held on 26 March 2016.

I also refer to a landmark ruling in March 2015, where the Supreme Court of India struck down a “draconian” law that allowed police to arrest people for comments on social media networks and other websites.

India’s apex court ruled that Section 66A of the Information Technology Act was unconstitutional in its entirety, and the definition of offences under the provision was “open-ended and undefined”.

The provision carried a punishment of up to three years in jail. Since its adoption in 2008, several people have been arrested for their comments on Facebook or Twitter. The law was challenged in a public interest litigation case by a law student after two young women were arrested in November 2012 in Mumbai for comments on Facebook following the death of a politician.

Speaker Karu Janasuriya presents Lifetime Award to Nalaka Gunawardene at Nelum Yaya Blog Awards on 26 March 2016 - Photo by Pasan B Weerasinghe

Speaker Karu Janasuriya presents Lifetime Award to Nalaka Gunawardene at Nelum Yaya Blog Awards on 26 March 2016 – Photo by Pasan B Weerasinghe

මගේ මාධ්‍ය ගුරුවරයා වූ ශ‍්‍රීමත් ආතර් සී. ක්ලාක් නිතර දුන් ඔවදනක් වූයේ  ඕනෑම කාලීන ප‍්‍රශ්නයක හෝ සංවාදයක සමීප දසුන මෙන්ම දුර රූපය හෙවත් සුවිසල් චිත‍්‍රය (Bigger Picture) ද විමසා බලන්න කියායි.

බොහෝ එදිනෙදා අරගල හා මත ගැටුම්වලට පසුබිම් වන ඓතිහාසික සාධක හා දිගුකාලීන ප‍්‍රවාහයන් තිබෙනවා. ඒවා හඳුනා ගැනීම හරහා වත්මන් සිදුවීම් වඩාත් හොඳින් අවබෝධ කර ගත හැකියි.

අපේ සමාජයේ ගතාතනුගතිකත්වය හා නූතනත්වය අතරත්, වැඩවසම් අධිපතිවාදය හා සමානාත්මතාව අතරත් නොනවතින අරගලයක් පවතිනවා.

මෙය හුදෙක් දේශපාලනමය හෝ පන්ති අතර ගැටුමක් පමණක් නොවෙයි. අධ්‍යාපන ක‍්‍රමය, වෘත්තීන් මෙන්ම ජන මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය ආදී බොහෝ තැන්හිදී එය විවිධාකාරයෙන් අපට හමු වනවා.

ඓතිහාසිකව වරප‍්‍රසාද භුක්ති විඳින සමාජ පිරිස් සෙසු අය නැගී එනවාට කැමති නැහැ. උදාහරණයකට 1931දී බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය පාලකයන් අපට සර්වජන ඡන්ද බලය ප‍්‍රදානය කිරීමට සැරසෙන විට අපේ සමහර ප‍්‍රභූන් හා උගතුන් එයට එරෙහි වුණා. තමන්ගේ ඡන්දය නිසි ලෙස භාවිත කිරීමට නොතේරෙන අයට එම බලය දීම අවදානම් සහගත බවට තර්ක කෙරුණා.

එහි යටි අරුත වූයේ ලක් ඉතිහාසයේ කිසිම දිනෙක සාමාන්‍ය ජනයාට කිසිදු අයිතියක් හෝ වරප‍්‍රසාදයක් හෝ නොතිබීමයි.

නූගතුන්ට හා දුප්පතුන්ට ආණ්ඩු තේරීමේ බලයක් නොදිය යුතුය යන්න එදා යටත් විජිත ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ පමණක් නොව වත්මන් තායිලන්තයේ ද ප‍්‍රභූන් තවමත් මතු කරන තර්කයක්. (සරසවි අධ්‍යාපනයක් නොලද හෝ ආදායම් බදු ගෙවීමට තරම් නොඋපයන අයගේ ඡන්ද බලය අහිමි කළ යුතු යයි තායි ප්‍රභූ පිරිසක් යෝජනා කොට තිබෙනවා.)

එහෙත් ලිබරල් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයට සංකල්පීය ලෙස කැප වී සිටි බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය පාලකයෝ අපේ ප‍්‍රභූ විරෝධතා මැද සර්වජන ඡන්ද බලය අපට දායාද කළා. යම් අඩුපාඩු සහිතව වුවත් වසර 85ක් තිස්සේ මැතිවරණ දුසිම් ගණනකදී අපේ ජනයා මේ බලය භාවිත කර තිබෙනවාග

මව්පියන්ගෙන් පාසල් ගාස්තු අය නොකර, මහජනයාගෙන් එකතු වන බදු මුදල් යොදවා අධ්‍යාපන ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය නඩත්තු කිරීමේ සංකල්පය 1940 දශකයේ යෝජනා වූ විට ද සමහර ප‍්‍රභූන්ගේ ප‍්‍රතිරෝධයක් මතුව ආවා. (නිදහස් අධ්‍යාපනය ලෙස වැරදියට හඳුන් වන්නේ මේ ක‍්‍රමයයි.)

එහිදී ද යටි අරුත වුයේ වරප‍්‍රසාද භුක්ති විඳිමින් සිටි සංඛ්‍යාත්මක සුළුතරය, අධ්‍යාපනය හරහා සාමාන්‍ය ජනයාගේ දු දරුවන් සමාජයේ උසස් යයි පිළිගත් වෘත්තීන්ට හා තනතුරුවලට පිවිසීම දැකීමට නොකැමැති වීමයි.

පසුගිය සියවසේ මේ තීරණාත්මක අවස්ථා දෙකෙහිදීම මෙරට සමහර පුවත්පත් (එවකට තිබූ ප‍්‍රබලම මාධ්‍යය) පොදු ජනයා වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටියා. සර්වජන ඡන්දයේත්, මුදල් අය නොකරන අධ්‍යාපනයේත් දිගු කාලීන සමාජ වටිනාකම තර්කානුකූලව පෙන්වා දීමට ප‍්‍රගතිශීලී පුවත්පත් කතුවරුන් පෙරට ආවා. (ඒ අතර ප‍්‍රතිගාමී බලවේග වෙනුවෙන් පෙනී සිටි පුවත්පත්ද තිබුණා.)

කන්නන්ගරයන්ගේ අධ්‍යාපන ප‍්‍රතිසංස්කරණවලට එරෙහිව නැගී ආ ප‍්‍රතිරෝධයට ප‍්‍රතිචාර දැක්වීමට ආචාර්ය ඊ. ඩබ්ලිව්. අදිකාරම්, ආචාර්ය ගුණපාල මලලසේකර හා ආනන්ද මීවනපලාන තිදෙනා ආරක්ෂක වළල්ලක් මෙන් ක‍්‍රියා කළ සැටි ලේඛනගතව තිබෙනවා. පොදු උන්නතිය සඳහා වැදගත් තීරණ හා පියවර වෙනුවෙන් ජනමතය ගොඩ නැංවීමට මාධ්‍ය සමහරකගේ සහයෝගය ඔවුන් ලබා ගත්තා.

එදාට වඩා මාධ්‍ය ආයතන බහුල වී ඇති, තාක්ෂණය ඉදිරියට ගොස් තිබෙන අද තත්ත්වය කුමක්ද? ඇන්ටනාවකින් නොමිලයේ හසු කර ගත හැකි ටෙලිවිෂන් සේවාවන් 20කට වැඩි ගණනක්, FM නාලිකා 50ක් පමණ හා භාෂා තුනෙන්ම විවිධාකාරයේ පුවත්පත් දුසිම් ගණනක් අද මෙරට තිබෙනවා.

එහෙත් පොදු උන්නතියට ඍජුවම අදාළ වන අවස්ථා හා සංවාදවලදී මේ මාධ්‍ය බහුතරයක් සිටින්නේ කොතැනක ද යන්න සීරුවෙන් විමසා බැලිය යුතුයි.

මගේ දිගු කාලීන නිරීක්ෂණය නම් වැඩවසම්, ගතානුගතික හා අධිපතිවාදී වුවමනාකම්/මතවාදයන් සඳහා අපේ මාධ්‍ය එළිපිටම පෙනී සිටීම ප‍්‍රබල වී ඇති බවයි.

මෙයට හේතුව මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය අධික ලෙස දේශපාලනකරණය ලක් වීම යයි යමෙකුට තර්ක කළ හැකියි. ඔව්, එයත් එක් හේතුවක්. එහෙත් මීට පරම්පරාවකට හෝ දෙකකට හෝ පෙර තිබූ මාධ්‍ය වෘත්තීය බව හා සමාජ කැප වීම ටිකෙන් ටික හීන වී යාමට මාධ්‍ය කර්මාන්තය තුළ අභ්‍යන්තර පිරිහීම ද දායක වී තිබෙනවා. මේ තත්ත්වය රාජ්‍ය මෙන්ම පෞද්ගලික හිමිකාරිත්වයෙන් යුතු මාධ්‍යවල දැකිය හැකියි.

වසර ගණනක් පුරා පැවති මාධ්‍ය මර්දනය හමුවේ සමහර මාධ්‍ය ආයතන හා මාධ්‍ය තීරකයන් (කතුවරුන්, කළමනාකරුවන්) හීලෑ වී ඇති බවක් පෙනෙනවා.

එසේම බහුතරයක් මාධ්‍ය අනවශ්‍ය පුජනීයත්වයකින් සලකන, එනිසාම හේතු සහගත විවේචනයකට හෝ බියවන ප්‍රසිද්ධ චරිත හා පොදු ආයතන සංඛ්‍යාව වෙන කවරදාටත් වඩා වැඩි වී තිබෙනවා.

මේ බොල් පිළිම වන්දනාවේ යන ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා වෙනුවෙන් හෝ පොදු උන්නතිය සඳහා හෝ පෙනී සිටීම කාලයක්, අවශ්‍යතාවක් නැහැ. මෙය ඛේදජනක යථාර්ථයක්.

කුලියාපිටියේ පාසල් දරුවා HIV ආසාදිත යැයි කියා කොන් කරනු ලැබූ විට අපේ බොහෝ බහුතරයක් මාධ්‍ය කළේ එය තලූ මරමින් වාර්තා කිරීම පමණයි. අඩු තරමින් ඒ දරුවාගේ හා මවගේ පෞද්ගලිකත්වයටවත් ගරු කෙරුණේ නැහැ. දරුවාට දුරින් පිහිටි විකල්ප පාසලක් සොයා දීමේ යෝජනාව මතු වී ඉදිරියට ගියේ ෆේස්බුක් සමාජ මාධ්‍යය හරහායි.

මහනුවර දළදා මාලිගය ඉදිරිපිටින් දිවෙන මාර්ගය වසර ගණනාවක් පුරා වාහන ධාවනයට ඉඩ නොදී වසා තිබීම නිසා ඇති වන අධික වාත දුෂණය හා අති මහත් ජනතා අපහසුතාව ගැන බොහෝ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ (සිංහල) මාධ්‍ය ඇති තරම් කතා නොකළේ ඇයි? අස්ගිරි විහාරය එය යළිත් විවෘත කිරීමට අහේතුකව විරුද්ධ වීම නිසාද?

නාමධාරී ටික දෙනෙකුගේ අත්තනෝමතික විරෝධය නිසා මේ ගැන විග‍්‍රහ කැරෙන විද්‍යාත්මක ලිපි පවා පළ කිරීමට සමහර පුවත්පත් පැකිලෙනවා. එම පසුබිම තුළ විවෘත සංවාද වෙබ්ගත වී තිබෙනවා. නැතිනම් සාපේක්ෂව වැඩි පරාසයක මත ගැටුමට ඉඩ දෙන ඉංග‍්‍රීසි පුවත්පත්වලට සීමා වී තිබෙනවා.

අපේ ඉංග‍්‍රීසි පුවත්පත් වුවද සමහර මාතෘකා ගැන විවෘත මත දැක්වීමට බියයි. මාධ්‍ය වාරණයක් හෝ මාධ්‍යවලට මැර බලය පෑමක් නැති අද දවසේත් සමහර කතුවරුන් මහ දවල් බියට පත් වන, අහම්බෙන්වත් විවේචනය නොකරන සමාජ ආයතන තිබෙනවා. හමුදාව හා සංඝ සමාජය ඒ අතර ප‍්‍රධානයි. විශ්වවිද්‍යාල ගැනත් බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය තුළ ඇත්තේ බය පක්ෂපාතීකම පෙරදැරි කර ගත් ආකල්පයක්.

මේ හැම ආයතනයකම හොඳ මෙන්ම නරකද සාක්ෂි සහිතව දැකීම හා මැදහත්ව විග‍්‍රහ කිරීම අපට මාධ්‍යවලින් බලාපොරොත්තු වන්නට බැහැ. තමන්ගේ සරසවි ඇදුරන් මාධ්‍ය හරහා අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස පිම්බීම මාධ්‍යකරුවන් අතර බහුල පුරුද්දක්.

වුවමනාවට වඩා බය පක්ෂපාතී වූ, අධිපතිවාදයන්ට නතු වූ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යයට යම් තරමකට හෝ විකල්ප අවකාශයක් මතු වන්නේ වෙබ් හරහා ලියැවෙන බ්ලොග් රචනා හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනය තුළින්. මෙය සමාජයීය හිදැසකට හෙවත් රික්තයකට මතුව ආ සාමූහික ප‍්‍රතිචාරයක් ලෙසද දැකිය හැකියි.

මාර්තු 26 වනදා දෙවන වරටත් පවත්වන ලද නෙළුම් යාය සිංහල බ්ලොග් සම්මාන උළෙලේදී මේ ගැන මා අදහස් දැක්වීමක් කළා. එහිදී මා කීවේ බ්ලොග් අවකාශය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වන ‘ගරු සරු නැති ගතිය’ (irreverence) දිගටම පවත්වා ගත යුතු බවයි.

මේ ගතිය අධිපතිවාදී තලයන්හි සිටින අයට, නැතිනම් ජීවිත කාලයක් පුරා අධිපතිවාදය ප‍්‍රශ්න කිරීමකින් තොරව පිළි ගෙන සිටින ගතානුගතිකයන්ට නොරිස්සීම අපට තේරුම් ගත හැකියි.

ඔවුන් මැසිවිලි නගන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නිසා සාරධර්ම බිඳ වැටන කියමින්. ඇත්තටම එහි යටි අරුත නම් පූජනීය චරිත ලෙස වැඳ ගෙන සිටින අයට/ආයතනවලට අභියෝග කැරෙන විට දෙවොලේ කපුවන් වී සිටින ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන්ට දවල් තරු පෙනීමයි!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පාලනය කරන්න යැයි ඔවුන් කෑගසන්නේ දේවාලේ ව්‍යාපාරවලට තර්ජනයක් මතු වීම හරහා කලබල වීමෙන්.

මෙයින් මා කියන්නේ  ඕනෑම දෙයක් කීමට හෝ ලිවීමට ඉඩ දිය යුතුය යන්න නොවෙයි. එහෙත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය ඉතා සීරුවෙන් කළ යුත්තක් බවයි. නැතහොත් සමාජයක් ලෙස දැනට ඉතිරිව තිබෙන විවෘත සංවාද කිරීමට ඇති අවසාන වේදිකාවත් අධිපතිවාදයට හා සංස්කෘතික පොලිසියට නතු වීමේ අවදානම තිබෙනවා.

අපටත් වඩා ගතානුගතික වූ ඉන්දියානු සමාජය පුරවැසි අයිතීන් වෙනුවෙන් නව තාක්ෂණය හා නූතනත්වය යොදා ගන්නා සැටි අධ්‍යයනය කිරීම වැදගත්.

Image courtesy The Hindustan Times

Image courtesy The Hindustan Times

2015 මාර්තුවේ ඉන්දියානු ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය වැදගත් තීන්දුවක් ප‍්‍රකාශයට පත් කළා. එනම් 2008දී පනවන ලද එරට තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණ පනතේ 66A වගන්තිය ව්‍යවස්ථා විරෝධී බවයි. එම වගන්තිය යටතේ ක‍්‍රියා කරමින් ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල විකල්ප මත පළ කළ ඉන්දියානුවන් කිහිප දෙනකු එරට පොලිසිය විසින් අත්අඩංගුවට ගෙන තිබුණා. මේ ගැන කම්පාවට පත් නීති ශිෂ්‍යාවක් මෙයට එරෙහිව එරට ඉහළම උසාවියට පෙත්සමක් ඉදිරිපත් කළා.

BBC Online: 24 March 2016

Section 66A: India court strikes down ‘Facebook’ arrest law

‘ඕනෑම සමාජයක භාෂණ නිදහස පැවතිය යුතු අතර එයට කරන සීමා කිරීම් අතිශයින් යුක්ති සහගත විය යුතුයි. තොරතුරු තාක්ෂණ පනතේ 66A වගන්තිය මේ සීමා ඉක්මවා ගිය, පුරවැසි ප‍්‍රකාශන අයිතිය අනිසි ලෙස කොටු කරන්නක්’ ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණ තීන්දුවේ සඳහන් වූවා.

තව දුරටත් තීන්දුව මෙසේද කීවා. ‘ඕනෑම කරුණක් ගැන සාකච්ඡා කරන්නත් (discussion), යම් ක‍්‍රියාමාර්ගයක් වෙනුවෙන් එයට පක්ෂව මත පළ කරන්නත් (advocacy) පුරවැසියන්ට නිදහස තිබෙනවා. එම මත දැක්වීම් කෙතරම් ජනප‍්‍රිය ද නැද්ද යන්න එහිදී අදාළ නැහැ. මත දැක්වීම ඉක්මවා යම් සමාජ විරෝධී උසිගැන්වීමක්  (incitement) සිදු වේ නම් පමණක් නීතිය හා සාමයට තර්ජනයක් කියා එය පාලනය කළ හැකියි. වෙබ් හරහා පළ කරන අදහස් සමහරුන්ට දිරවා ගත නොහැකි වූ පමණටවත්, අතිශයින් ආන්දෝලනාත්මක වූ පමණටවත් එයට මැදිහත් වීමට පොලිසියට හෝ රජයට හෝ ඉඩක් නොතිබිය යුතුයි.

The Hindu, 26 March 2016: The judgment that silenced Section 66A

මේ ඉතා වැදගත් තීන්දුව ගැන අදහස් දැක්වූ ප‍්‍රකට ඉන්දියානු නීති ක‍්‍රියාකාරකයකු වන ලෝරන්ස් ලියැං (Lawrence Liang) කිවේ මෙයයි. ‘ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී සමාජයක විවේචනය කිරීමට හා විසමුම්තියට  ඕනෑම අයකුට නිදහස තිබිය යුතු බව ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය නැවත වරක් පිළිගෙන තියෙනවා. යම් මත දැක්වීමක් නිසා සමහරුන්ගේ මාන්නයට හෝ අධිපතිවාදයට පහර වැදුණු පමණට එය කිසිසේත්ම නීති විරෝධී වන්නේ නැහැ!’

Free speech Ver.2.0, by Lawrence Liang. The Hindu. 25 March 2015

21 වන සියවසේ ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ගැන විමර්ශනය කරන විට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා කරන තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවට හා මත දැක්වීම්වලට අනිවාර්යයෙන්ම ඉඩ සහතික කළ යුතු බව ඔහු කියනවා. ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට පමණක් සුවිශේෂී වන අයිතියක් නොවෙයි.

‘භාෂණ හා ප‍්‍රකාශන නිදහස ගැන ඉන්දියාවේ අලූත් ආකාරයේ සංවාදයන් බිහි වන සැටි මා දකිනවා. 66A වගන්තිය ඉවත් කිරීමට පෙළ ගැසුණේ නීතිඥයන්, බ්ලොග් රචකයන්, සමාජ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන්නන්. සන්නිවේදනය නම් වූ පරිසර පද්ධතිය තුළ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යවලට අමතරව දැන් වෙබ්ගත සන්නිවේදකයන් ද හරි හරියට සක‍්‍රීයව සිටිනවා. මේ නිසා රජයන්ට හා අධිපතිවාදීන්ට හිතුමතයට ක‍්‍රියා කළ නොහැකියි.’ ලියැං තවදුරටත් කියනවා.

ළිංමැඬියාවෙන් පෙළෙන අපේ සමාජයට කවදා හෝ ළිඳෙන් ගොඩ යන්නට අත්වැලක් සපයන්නේ අධිපතිවාදය හෙළා දකින නූතනත්වය පමණයි!

Posted in Arthur C Clarke, Blogging, Citizen journalism, citizen media, community media, Democracy, digital media, Digital Natives, good governance, ICT, India, Information Society, Innovation, Internet, Journalism, Media activism, Media freedom, New media, public interest, Ravaya Column, South Asia, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Writing, youth. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #260: විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය යනු වාරණය නොවේ!

Sri Lanka’s broadcast sector, which was a state monopoly for decades, was finally opened up for private sector participation in 1992. However, it has been an ad hoc process ever since – with no clear rules nor any independent enforcement or regulatory mechanism. The broadcast licensing process remains undefined, opaque and discretionary on the part of politicians and officials in charge of media.

This has led to a squandering of the electromagnetic spectrum, a public property: private sector participation in broadcasting has been open only to business confidantes of various ruling parties that have been in office since 1990.

In this Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 6 March 2016), I further discuss the highly problematic broadcast ‘liberalisation’ in Sri Lanka and the resulting complications. I quote from an expert analysis titled Political economy of the electronic media in Sri Lanka by Tilak Jayaratne and Sarath Kellapotha (2012). I also discuss potential ways of resolving the current chaos by regularizing the broadcast licensing process, setting up an independent broadcast regulator, and belatedly bringing transparency and accountability to the sector.

Finally, I clarify that media regulation is not the control of media content or messages, but merely creating a level playing field for all participant companies including the state broadcasters in ways that would best serve the interest of audiences who are the public.

Photo by Louie Psihoyos, National Geographic

Photo by Louie Psihoyos, National Geographic

වසර 25ක කාලයක් තිස්සේ, විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය (රේඩියෝ, ටෙලිවිෂන්) ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයට පෞද්ගලික සමාගම්වලට පිවිසීමට ඉඩ දීම හරහා පොදු සම්පතක් වන විද්‍යුත් සංඛ්‍යාත අපහරණය වී ඇති සැටි අප ගිය සතියේ කතා කළා.

මගේ විග‍්‍රහයේ අරමුණ වූයේ රජයේ විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය භාවිතය හා (පෙර පැවති) ඒකාධිකාරය සාධාරණීකරණය කිරීම නොවෙයි. රටට තනි රේඩියෝ ආයතනයක් හා ටෙලිවිෂන් ආයතන දෙකක් තිබූ, ඒ සියල්ලම රජයේ හොරණෑ වූ 1992ට පෙර යුගයට ආපසු යන්නට මා නම් කැමති නැහැ.

එහෙත් පොදු දේපළක් වන සංඛ්යාත පාරදෘශ් රමවේදයක් හරහා රාජ්, පෞද්ගලික හා රජා මාධ් අතර බෙදා නොදීමේ විපාකයි අප දැන් අත් විඳින්නේ. රමාද වී හෝ විද්යුත් මාධ් ක්ෂේතරයේ බලපත් ලබා දීම, සංඛ්යාත බෙදා දීම හා ඒවා ලබන්නන්ගේ සමාජයීය වගකීම් සහතික කිරීම සඳහා නිසි නියාමනයක් අත්යවශ්යයි.

වඩාත් පරිණත ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදයක් හා ආණ්ඩුකරණයක් ඇති රටවල විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය නිසියාකාරව නියාමනයට ලක් වනවා. නියාමනය (media regulation) යනු කිසිසේත් මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතය පාලනය කිරීම (content control) හෝ වාරණය කිරීම (censorship) නොවෙයි.

පොදු දේපළක් භාවිත කරමින් විකාශයන් කරන ආයතන නිසි නීතිමය හා ආචාරධර්ම රාමුවකට නතු කිරීම හා ඒ හරහා පොදු උන්නතියට මුල් තැන දීම පමණයි.

විදුලි සංදේශ ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයේ මෙය සිදු කෙරුණේ 1990 දශකයේදී. ඓතිහාසිකව ටෙලිකොම් ඒකාධිකාරය හිමිව තිබූ විදුලි සංදේශ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව ප‍්‍රතිව්‍යුහගත කිරීමෙන් හා එයට පරිබාහිරව ටෙලිකොම් නියාමන කොමිසමක් (TRCSL) බිහි කිරීමෙන්. ඒ හරහා තරගකාරීත්වයට ඉඩ දී පාරිභෝගිකයාට වාසි වැඩි කළා.

අපේ ටෙලිකොම් නියාමන කොමිසම රජයේ ආයතනයක් නිසා එය ස්වාධීන නැහැ. එහෙත් ටෙලිකොම් ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය විධිමත් කිරීමට සැලකිය යුතු මෙහෙවරක් කරනවා. මේ හා සමාන ආයතනයක් රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් ක්ෂේත‍්‍රවල තවමත් නැහැ.

එයට රාමුව සපයන නීතියක් ද නැති පසුබිම තුළ විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයට ඇත්තේ 1966 ගුවන් විදුලි සංස්ථා පනත හා 1982 රූපවාහිනී සංස්ථා පනත පමණයි. මේ දෙකම යල්පැන ගිය, නූතන අභියෝගවලට මුහුණ දීමට නොහැකි නීති දෙකක්. මෙනයින් විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය නියාමනයට අප තවම ප‍්‍රවේශ වී හෝ නැහැ. කළ යුතු බොහෝ දේ තිබෙනවා.

1925 සිට 1992 දක්වා වසර 67ක් මුළුමනින්ම ලක් රජයේ ඒකාධිකාරයක් ලෙස පැවති විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයට 1992 සිට පෞද්ගලික අංශයේ ඇතැම් සමාගම්වලට පිවිසීමට ඉඩ ලැබුණා. මුලින් රේඩියෝ නාලිකා ඇරැඹීමටත්, පසුව ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා පවත්වා ගෙන යාමටත් ඉඩ දීම විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය විවෘත කිරීම (Broadcast liberalisation) ලෙස හඳුන්වනු ලැබුවත් එය විවෘත, ක‍්‍රමවත් හා අපක්ෂපාත ලෙස සිදු වූයේ නැහැ.

මුල පටන් අද දක්වාම සිදු වෙමින් ඇත්තේ බලයේ සිටින පක්ෂවලට සමීප හා හිතවත් ව්යාපාරිකයන්ට විද්යුත් මාධ් ඇරැඹීමේ බලපත් (ලයිසන්) ලබා දී සඳහා සංඛ්යාත අනුයුක්ත කිරීමයි. 1992 සිට පැවති සියලූම රජයන් සිය ගජමිතුරු ව්යාපාරිකයන් හා හිතවතුන් අතර මේ වරපරසාදය බෙදා දී තිබෙනවා.

1994 අගෝස්තු 15 වැනිදා පැවති මහ මැතිවරණයෙන් පොදු ජන එක්සත් පෙරමුණ බලයට පත් වුණා. ඔවුන්ගේ මැතිවරණ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති ප‍්‍රකාශයේ මාධ්‍ය ගැන කරුණු කිහිපයක් සඳහන් වූවා. ජනමාධ්‍ය රජයේ හා දේශපාලකයන්ගේ පාලනයෙන් නිදහස් කිරීම, මාධ්‍ය නිදහස සහතික කිරීම, මුද්‍රිත හා විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය දෙකේම ගුණාත්මක අගය දියුණු කිරීම මෙන්ම නව භාවිතයන් තුළින් අලූත් ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රවාදී මාධ්‍ය සංස්කෘතියක් ගොඩනැගීම ඒ අතර තිබුණා.

මේ ප‍්‍රතිඥා රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිපත්තිය ලෙස 1994 ඔක්තෝබරයේ කැබිනට් මණ්ඩලය විසින් පිළිගනු ලැබුවා. මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිසංස්කරණය සඳහා විද්වත් කමිටු තුනක් පත් කළා. ඒවා පුළුල් සංවාදයන්ගෙන් පසු හරබර නිර්දේශ රැසක් යෝජනා කළත් අවාසනාවකට චන්ද්‍රිකා රජය ඒවා ක‍්‍රියාත්මක කළේ නැහැ.

විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයේ දශක ගණනක අත්දැකීම් තිබූ නැසී ගිය තිලක් ජයරත්න සූරීන් හා කෘතහස්ත රේඩියෝ මාධ්‍යවේදී සරත් කැල්ලපත දෙපළ මෙරට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍යයේ පරිණාමය හා වත්මන් අභියෝග ගැන විචාරශීලී නිබන්ධයක් 2012දී රචනා කළා. [Political Economy of the Electronic Media in Sri Lanka. http://goo.gl/H8UYeq]

Tilak Jayaratne

Tilak Jayaratne

ඔවුන් 1990 දශකයේ මුල් භාගය ගැන මෙසේ කියනවා. ‘(තෝරා ගත්) පෞද්ගලික සමාගම්  හරහා රේඩියෝ සේවාවන් කිහිපයකුත් ටෙලිවිෂන් සේවාවන් දෙක තුනකුත් ඇරඹුනේ මේ කාලයෙයි. එහෙත් දේශීය ප‍්‍රවෘත්ති ප‍්‍රචාරය කිරීම ඔවුනට තහනම් වුණා. විදෙස් ප‍්‍රවෘත්ති සේවා මෙරට ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කරන විටදී පවා ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාව ගැන කිසිදු සඳහනක් වූවොත් එය අවහිර කළ යුතු වුණා. මේ සාපේක්ෂ විවිධත්වය හරහා සැබැවින්ම මාධ්‍ය බහුවිධත්වයක් හෝ මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයේ ප‍්‍රජාතන්ත‍්‍රීකරණයක් හෝ බිහි වූයේ නැහැ. එසේම මුල් වසර කිහිපයේදී රාජ්‍ය විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය සතුව තිබූ ඒකාධිකාරයට ප‍්‍රබල අභියෝගයක් එල්ල වූයේද නැහැ.’

විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිව්‍යුහකරණයේ දේශපාලන සීමාවන් මනාව පෙනී ගිය අවස්ථාවක් ලෙස රජයේ ගුවන් විදුලි සංස්ථාවේ නව අධ්‍යාපන සේවය ඔවුන් ගෙන හැර දක්වනවා. විජේතුංග ජනාධිපතිවරයා යටතේ 1994 ජුනි මාසයේ අරඹන ලද මේ සේවය වඩාත් විවෘත, සංවාදශීලී ආකෘතියක් හඳුන්වා දුන්නත් එය ටික කලකට පමණක් සීමා වූ සැටි ඔවුන් විස්තර කරනවා.

මාධ්‍ය නිදහස ස්ථාපිත කරන බවට ප‍්‍රතිඥා දෙමින් බලයට පත් චන්ද්‍රිකා කුමාරතුංග රජය යටතේ වුවත් පවතින රජයේ දේශපාලන දැක්මට වෙනස් වූ අදහස් සාකච්ඡා කිරීමට මේ සේවය තුළද ඉඩක් ලැබුණේ නැහැ.

1997 මාර්තුවේ චන්ද්‍රිකා රජය ශ‍්‍රී ලංකා විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය අධිකාරියක් පිහිටුවීමට පනත් කෙටුම්පතක් (Sri Lanka Broadcasting Authority Bill) ගැසට් කළා. මෙය අභියෝගයට ලක් කරමින් පුරවැසියන් 15 දෙනෙකු ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණයේ පෙත්සමක් ගොනු කළා.

රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍යවලට එක් අන්දමකටත්, පෞද්ගලික මාධ්‍යවලට තවත් අන්දමකටත් නියාමනය කිරීමට යෝජිතව තිබීම වෙනස්කමක් හා අසාධාරණයක් යැයි ඔවුන් තර්ක කළා. මේ ඇතුලූ තවත් තර්ක සලකා බැලූ ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය එම පනත් කෙටුම්පත ව්‍යවස්ථානුකූල නොවන බව තීරණය කළා.

එම වැදගත් නඩු තීන්දුවේ මෙසේ ද සඳහන් වුණා. ‘විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත‍්‍ර ලබා දෙන ආයතනය රජයෙන් ස්වාධීන විය යුතුයි. රාජ්‍ය හා පෞද්ගලික හිමිකාරිත්වය යටතේ ඇති සියලූම විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය එක් නියාමන අධිකාරියක් යටතේ තිබීම වඩාත් යෝග්‍යයි. එවිට එම ක්ෂේත‍්‍රයට අදාළ ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති  නිසි ලෙස සාදාගෙන ක‍්‍රියාත්මක කළ හැකි වනවා. මේ ස්වාධීන නියාමන අධිකාරියට විද්‍යුත් සංඛ්‍යාත බෙදාදීම ඇතුළු සියලූ තාක්ෂණික සාධක ගැන වගකිව යුතුයි.’

TV-Tower-Spectrum

එම පනත් කෙටුම්පත සංශෝධිතව යළි ඉදිරිපත් කෙරුණේ නැහැ. මේ නිසා අද දක්වාත් මෙරට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ක්ෂේත‍්‍රය අවිධිමත්, නිසි නියාමන රාමුවකින් තොරව ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වනවා. නිලධාරීන්ගේ හා අමාත්‍යවරුන්ගේ හිතුමතයට තීරණ ගැනීම දිගටම සිදු වනවා.

1992-2012 දශක දෙකක කාලය තුළ විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත‍්‍ර රැසක්ම නිකුක් කළත්, අපේක්ෂිත පරිදි සැබෑ මාධ්‍ය බහුවිධත්වයක් (media pluralism) මෙරට බිහි වී නැහැ.

බහුවිධත්වය සඳහා නාලිකා/සේවා ගණන වැඩි වීම පමණක් සෑහෙන්නේ නැහැ. සමාජයක සියලූ ජන කොටස් හා මතවාදයන් නිසි ලෙස නියෝජනය කරන, ඉඩ සලසන මාධ්‍ය පාරිසරික පද්ධතියක් බිහිවීම අවශ්‍යයි. අගනුවර කේන්ද්‍රීය, රාජ්‍ය මූලික හා වෙළඳපොළ ප‍්‍රාග්ධනයට නතු මාධ්‍යවලින් පමණක් මෙය සපුරා ගන්නට බැහැ.

ජයරත්න හා කැල්ලපත මෙරට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ඉතිහාසය මෙසේ කැටි කරනවා. “යුරෝපයේ රේඩියෝ පටන් ගත් කාලයේම වගේ මෙරටටත් එම මාධ්‍යය හඳුන්වා දෙනු ලැබුව ද, එයට ආවේණික වූ බි‍්‍රතාන්‍ය සම්ප‍්‍රදායන් මෙහි ආයේ නැහැ. අපට ආවේණික විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් අප බිහි කර ගත්තේ ද නැහැ. දශක ගණනක් තනිකරම රජයේ ප‍්‍රචාරක මාධ්‍යය වූ රේඩියෝ (පසු කාලීනව ටෙලිවිෂන්) ඉනික්බිති පෞද්ගලික සමාගම්වලට ලාභ උපදවන ව්‍යාපාර වූවා. ඉඳහිට මහජන සේවා විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍යවල ගතිගුණ දක්නට ලැබුණත් බොහෝ කොටම අපට ඇත්තේ අධිපතිවාදී, ප‍්‍රචාරාත්මක මාධ්‍ය කලාවක්.

“එසේම මෙරට ප‍්‍රජා ගුවන්විදුලි සේවා ඇතැයිද කීම ද මුලාවක්. මන්ද මෙරට ඇත්තේ රජයේ ගුවන් විදුලියේ ග‍්‍රාමීය විකාශයන් මිස සැබැවින්ම ප‍්‍රජාව පාලනය කරන රේඩියෝ නොවේ. වාණිජකරණය හමුවේ තොරතුරු හා මහජන අධ්‍යාපනයට වඩා විනෝදාස්වාදයට මුල් තැන දීම පෞද්ගලික විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිපත්තියයි.”

26 April 2015: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #216: ලොවම හිනස්සන ලක් රජයේ සන්නිවේදන විහිළු

රාජ්‍ය-පෞද්ගලික දෙඅංශයම පොදු දේපළක් වන විද්‍යුත් සංඛ්‍යාත යොදා ගෙන රේඩියෝ-ටෙලිවිෂන් විකාශය කළත්, අන්තිමේදී මේ දෙපිරිසම පොදු උන්නතියට කැප වන්නේ සීමිත අන්දමින් පමණයි. 1990 සිට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත‍්‍ර ලැබූවන් අතර වත්මන් අග‍්‍රාමාත්‍යවරයාගේ සහෝදරයන් දෙදෙනෙකුද සිටිනවා. (ශාන් වික‍්‍රමසිංහ හා නිරාජ් වික‍්‍රමසිංහ).

ගජමිතුරන්ට හිතුමතයට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත‍්‍ර හා සංඛ්‍යාත ලබා දීමේදී ඔවුන් නිසි නියාමනයකට යටත් කොට නැහැ. එසේම හේතු නොදක්වා බලපත්  ඕනෑම විටෙක ආපසු ගත හැකි වීම හරහා මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයට අනිසි බලපෑම් කිරීමටද දේශපාලකයන්ට හා නිලධාරීන්ට අවකාශය ලැබෙනවා.

1992 සිට 2012 දක්වා විවිධ රජයන් යටතේ නිකුත් කළ විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත‍්‍රධාරීන්ගේ ලැයිස්තුවක් මාධ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශ වෙබ් අඩවියේ තිබෙනවා. රාජ්‍ය විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය හැරුණු කොට පෞද්ගලික සමාගම් 38කට බලපත‍්‍ර දී තිබෙනවා. සමහරුන්ට රේඩියෝ පමණයි. තවත් අයට රේඩියෝ ටෙලිවිෂන් දෙකම. සමහරුන්ට භෞමික සංඥා බෙදාහැරීමටත්, තවත් සමාගම්වලට චන්ද්‍රිකා හරහා බෙදා හැරීමටත් අවසර දී තිබෙනවා. http://www.media.gov.lk/images/pdf_word/licensed-institutions-tv-radio.pdf

මේ බලපත් 38න් 25ක්ම නිකුත් කොට ඇත්තේ 2006-2011 වකවානුවේ. එනම් රාජපක්ෂ පාලන සමයේදී. බලපත් ලද සැවොම විකාශ අරඹා නැහැ.

හරි පාරේ ගොස් තරගකාරීව, විවෘතව ඉල්ලා සිට විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය බලපත් ලද නොහැකි පසුබිම තුළ හොර පාරෙන් ලබා ගත් බලපත්වලට ලොකු ඉල්ලූමක් බිහිව තිබෙනවා. සමහර බලපත‍්‍ර කිහිප විටක් අතින් අත ගොස් ඇත්තේ රුපියල් කෝටි ගණනක මුදල් හුවමාරුවටයි.

ඇත්තටම විද්යුත් සංඛ්යාත කළු කඩයක් බිහිවීම (black market in broadcast licences) ගැන 1990 සිට බලයේ සිටි සියලූම රජයන් වගකිව යුතුයි.

මේ ගැන මෑතදී විග්‍රහයක් කළ දේශපාලන විචාරක හා බ්ලොග් ලේඛක අජිත් පැරකුම් ජයසිංහ මෙසේ කියනවා:

Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe

Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe

“ලංකාවේ විකාශන තරංග පරාසය බෙදා දෙන ආකාරය නීත්‍යානුකූල නැත. එය ආණ්ඩුක්‍ර‍ම ව්‍යවස්ථාවේ ප්‍ර‍ජාතාන්ත්‍රික මූලධර්මවලට ද පටහැණිය. පාසලක කැන්ටිමක් බදු දෙන විටත් ටෙන්ඩර් කැඳවාල ඕනෑම කෙනෙකුට විවෘතව මිළ ගණන් ඉදිරිපත් කිරීමට අවස්ථාව ලබා දී සුදුස්සා තෝරා ගනු ලැබේ.

“පොදු දේපලවල භාරකරු වන රජය ඒවා සම්බන්ධයෙන් පාරදෘෂ්‍ය අන්දමින් කටයුතු කළ යුතු බව ඉතා පැහැදිලිය. රජය පොදු දේපලවල හිමිකරු නොව ඒවායේ භාරකරු පමණක් බව එප්පාවල පොස්පේට් නිධිය සම්බන්ධයෙන් මහමාන්කඩවල පියරතන හිමියන් විසින් පවරන ලද නඩුවට අදාළව ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය විසින් දෙන ලද තීන්දුවෙහි පැහැදිලිව දැක්වේ.

“එසේ නම්, මහජනතාවට අයිති පොදු දේපලක් වන ගුවන් විදුලි විකාශ පරාසය පමණක් යාලු මිත්‍ර‍කමටල පගාවට හිතවතුන්ට බෙදා දුන්නේ කෙසේද? මහජනතාවගේ ගුවන් විදුලි පරාසයෙන් සංඛ්‍යාත සොරකම් කළ සොරුන් අතර ජනතා විමුක්ති පෙරමුණ ද සිටින නිසා ඔවුන් දැන්වත් මේ ගැන කතා කළ යුතුය.

“මහජනතාවගේ සංඛ්‍යාත සොරකම් කරගත් අයට ජන මනස විකෘති කරන. ජාතිවාදී, ආගම්වාදී, ස්ත්‍රී විරෝධී වැඩසටහන් විකාශය කිරීමට ඉඩ දීමට ආණ්ඩුවට අයිතියක් නැත. එහෙම වැඩසටහන් ඉදිරිපත් කිරීම මාධ්‍ය නිදහස වන්නේ ද නැත.”  http://www.w3lanka.com/2016/02/blog-post_15.html

විද්‍යුත් චුම්බක වර්ණාවලියේ සමහර පරාසයන්වල තව දුරටත් දීමට සංඛ්‍යාත ඉතිරිව නැහැ. FM පරාසය දැනටමත් තදබදයට ලක් වෙලා. මෙයට හේතුව රටේ නීතියක් නැති වුවත් භෞතික විද්‍යාවේ නීති කවදත් කොතැනත් එක ලෙස ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වීමයි.

හිටපු ටෙලිකොම් නියාමක හා සන්නිවේදන විශේෂඥ මහාචාර්ය රොහාන් සමරජීව කියන්නේ හොඳම ක‍්‍රමවේදය නම් සංඛ්‍යාත සඳහා වෙන්දේසියක් පවත්වා ඉහළම ඉල්ලූම්කරුවන්ට ඒවා ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ බදු දීම බවයි.

ජයරත්න හා කැල්ලපත ලියූ නිබන්ධය සිංහලෙන්:

http://mediareformlanka.com/files/Media_Book_Sinhala.pdf

Posted in Broadcasting, common property resources, Communicating research, community media, Democracy, good governance, ICT, Information Society, Internet, Media, Media freedom, Media Reforms, open spectrum, public interest, Ravaya Column, Sri Lanka, Telecommunications, Television. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »

Grassroots Journalism in the Digital Age: Innovate or Perish!

Grassroots Journalism in the Digital Age - by Nalaka Gunawardene

Grassroots Journalism in the Digital Age – by Nalaka Gunawardene

I just spoke to a group of 75 provincial level provincial journalists in Sri Lanka who were drawn from around the island. They had completed a training course in investigative journalism conducted by Transparency International Sri Lanka (TISL), with support from InterNews.

The certificate award ceremony was held at Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI), Colombo, on 2 October 2015.

In this talk, I look at the larger news media industry in Sri Lanka to which provincial journalists supply ground level news, images and video materials. These are used on a discretionary basis by media companies mostly based in the capital Colombo (and some based in the northern provincial capital of Jaffna). Suppliers have no control over whether or how their material is processed. They work without employment benefits, are poorly paid, and also exposed to various pressures and coercion.

A tale of two industries: one that evolved, and the other that hasn't quite done so...

A tale of two industries: one that evolved, and the other that hasn’t quite done so…

I draw a rough analogy with the nearly 150-year old Ceylon Tea industry, which directly employs around 750,000 people, sustains an estimated 2 million (10% of the population) and in 2014 earned USD 1.67 billion through exports. For much of its history, the Ceylon tea producers were supplying high quality tea leaves in bulk form to London based tea distributors and marketers like Lipton.

Then, in the 1970s, a former tea taster called Merrill J Fernando established Dilmah brand – the first producer owned tea brand that did product innovation at source, and entered direct retail. He wanted to “change the exploitation of his country’s crop by big global traders” – Dilmah has today become one of the top 10 tea brands in the world.

The media industry also started during British colonial times, and in fact dates back to 1832. But I question why, after 180+ years, our media industry broadly follows the same production model: material sourced is centrally processed and distributed, without much adaptation to new digital media realities.

I draw a parallel between tea small holders – those growing on lands less than 10 acres (4 ha) who account for 60% of Sri Lanka’s annual tea production – and the provincial journalists. Both are supplies at the beginning of a chain. Neither has much or any say in how their material is processed and marketed.

Provincial Journalists - Ground level ‘eyes and ears’ of media industry, unsung & often unknown

Provincial Journalists – Ground level ‘eyes and ears’ of media industry, unsung & often unknown

As usual, I don’t have all the answers, but I ask some pertinent questions:

Where are the Merrill Fernandos of our media industry?

Who can disrupt these old models and innovate?

Can disruptive innovators emerge from among provincial journalists?

How can they leverage digital tools and web based platforms?

What if they start value-adding at source and direct distribution via the web?

But since they have families to feed, how to make an honest living doing that?

PPT on SLIDEShare:

http://www.slideshare.net/NalakaG/grassroots-journalism-in-the-digital-age-by-nalaka-gunawardene

Corridors of Power Panel: Tapping our ‘Hybrid Media Reality’ to secure democracy in Sri Lanka

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera

Sanjana Hattotuwa, curator, introduces panel L to R Asoka Obeyesekere, Amantha Perera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Lakshman Gunasekera. Photo by Manisha Aryal

I just spoke on a panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy” which was part of the public exhibition in Colombo called Corridors of power: Drawing and modelling Sri Lanka’s tryst with democracy.

Media panel promo

The premise for our panel was as follows:

The architecture of the mainstream media, and increasingly, social media (even though distinct divisions between the two are increasingly blurred) to varying degrees reflects or contests the timbre of governance and the nature of government.

How can ‘acts of journalism’ by citizens revitalise democracy and how can journalism itself be revived to engage more fully with its central role as watchdog?

In a global contest around editorial independence stymied by economic interests within media institutions, how can Sri Lanka’s media best ensure it attracts, trains and importantly, retains a calibre of journalists who are able to take on the excesses of power, including the silencing of inconvenient truths by large corporations?

The panel, moderated by lawyer and political scientist Asoka Obeyesekere comprised freelance journalist Amantha Perera, Sunday Observer editor Lakshman Gunasekera, and myself.

Here are my opening remarks (including some remarks made during Q&A).

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power - Photo by Manisha Aryal

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks during media panel at Corridors of Power – Photo by Manisha Aryal

Panel on “Framing discourse: Media, Power and Democracy”

20 Sep 2015, Colombo

Remarks by Nalaka Gunawardene

Curator Sanjana has asked us to reflect on a key question: What is the role of media in securing democracy against its enemies, within the media itself and beyond?

I would argue that we are in the midst of multiple, overlapping deficits:

  • Democracy Deficit, a legacy of the past decade in particular, which is now recognised and being addressed (but we have a long way to go)
  • Public Trust Deficit in politicians and public institutions – not as widely recognised, but is just as pervasive and should be worrying us all.
  • Media Deficit, probably the least recognised deficit of all. This has nothing to do with media’s penetration or outreach. Rather, it concerns how our established (or mainstream) MEDIA FALLS SHORT IN PERFORMING the responsibilities of watchdog, public platform and the responsibility to “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable”.

In this context, can new media – citizens leveraging the web, mobile devices and the social media platforms – bridge this deficit?

My answer is both: YES and NO!

YES because new media opportunities can be seized – and are being seized — by our citizens to enhance a whole range of public interest purposes, including:

  • Political participation
  • Advocacy and activism
  • Transparency and accountability in public institutions
  • Peace-building and reconciliation
  • Monitoring and critiquing corporate conduct

All these trends are set to grow and involve more and more citizens in the coming years. Right now, one in four Lankans uses the web, mostly thru mobile devices.

BUT CAN IT REPLACE THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA?

NO, not in the near term. For now, these counter-media efforts are not sufficient by themselves to bridge the three deficits I have listed above. The mainstream media’s products have far more outreach and and the institutions, far more resources.

Also, the rise of citizen-driven new media does NOT – and should NOT — allow mainstream media to abdicate its social responsibilities.

This is why we urgently need MEDIA SECTOR REFORMS in Sri Lanka – to enhance editorial independence AND professionalism.

The debate is no longer about who is better – Mainstream media (MSM) or citizen driven civic media.

WE NEED BOTH.

So let us accept and celebrate our increasingly HYBRID MEDIA REALITY (‘hybrid’ seems to be currently popular!). This involves, among other things:

  • MSM drawing on Civic Media content; and
  • Civic Media spreading MSM content even as they critique MSM

To me, what really matters are the ACTS OF JOURNALISM – whether they are RANDOM acts or DELIBERATE acts of journalism.

Let me end by drawing on my own experience. Trained and experienced in mainstream print and broadcast media, I took to web-based social media 8 years ago when I started blogging (for fun). I started tweeting five years ago, and am about to cross 5,000 followers.

It’s been an interesting journey – and nowhere near finished yet.

Everyday now, I have many and varied CONVERSATIONS with some of my nearly 5,000 followers on Twitter. Here are some of the public interest topics we have discussed during this month:

  • Rational demarcation of Ministry subject areas (a lost cause now)
  • Implications of XXL Cabinet of the National/Consensus Govt
  • Questionable role of our Attorney General in certain prosecutions
  • Report on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) Session
  • Is Death Penalty the right response to rise of brutal murders?
  • Can our media be more restrained and balanced in covering sexual crimes involving minors?
  • How to cope with Hate Speech on ethnic or religious grounds
  • What kind of Smart Cities or MegaCity do we really need?
  • How to hold CocaCola LK responsible for polluting Kelani waters?

Yes, many of these are fleeting and incomplete conversations. So what?

And also, there’s a lot of noise in social media: it’s what I call the Global Cacophony.

BUT these conversations and cross-talk often enrich my own understanding — and hopefully help other participants too.

Self-promotional as this might sound, how many Newspaper Editors in Sri Lanka can claim to have as many public conversations as I am having using social media?

Let me end with the closing para in a chapter on social media and governance I recently wrote for Transparency International’s Sri Lanka Governance Report 2014 (currently in print):

“Although there have been serious levels of malgovernance in Sri Lanka in recent years, the build up on social media platforms to the Presidential Election 2015 showed that Lankan citizens have sufficient maturity to use ICTs and other forms of social mobilisation for a more peaceful call for regime change. Channelling this civic energy into governance reform is the next challenge.”

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa

Photo by Sanjana Hattotuwa

Echelon August 2015 column: Media Reforms – The Unfinished Agenda

Text of my column written for Echelon monthly business magazine, Sri Lanka, August 2015 issue

Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Sri Lanka Cartoonist of the Year 2014

Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Sri Lanka Cartoonist of the Year 2014

Media Reforms: The Unfinished Agenda

By Nalaka Gunawardene

When I was growing up in the 1970s, Sri Lanka’s media landscape was very different. We had only one radio station (state-owned SLBC) and three newspaper houses (Lake House, Times of Ceylon and Independent Newspapers). There was no TV, and the web wasn’t even invented.

At that time, most discussions on media freedom and reforms centred around how to contain the overbearing state – which was a key publisher, as well as the sole broadcaster, dominant advertiser and media regulator, all rolled into one.

Four decades on, the state still looms large on our media landscape, but there are many more players. The number of media companies, organisations and products has steadily increased, especially after private sector participation in broadcasting was allowed in 1992.

More does not necessarily mean better, however. Media researchers and advocacy groups lament that broadcast diversification has not led to a corresponding rise in media pluralism – not just in terms of media ownership and content, but also in how the media reflects diversity of public opinion, particularly of those living on the margins of society.

As the late Tilak Jayaratne and Sarath Kellapotha, two experienced broadcasters, noted in a recent book, “There exists a huge imbalance in both media coverage and media education as regards minorities and the marginalised. This does not come as a surprise, as it is known that media in Sri Lanka, both print and broadcast, cater mainly to the elite, irrespective of racial differences.”

 Media under pressure

 The multi-author book, titled Embattled Media: Democracy, Governance and Reform in Sri Lanka (Sage Publications, Feb 2015), was compiled during 2012-14 by a group of researchers and activists who aspired for a freer and more responsible media. It came out just weeks after the last Presidential Election, where media freedom and reforms were a key campaigning issue.

In their preface, co-editors William Crawley, David Page and Kishali Pinto-Jayawardena say: “Media liberalisation from the 1990s onwards had extended the range of choice for viewers and listeners and created a more diverse media landscape. But the war in the north and insurrections in the south had taken their toll of media freedoms. The island had lived under a permanent state of emergency for nearly three decades. The balance of power between government, judiciary, the media and the public had been put under immense strain.”

Embattled Media - Democracy, Governance and Reform in Sri Lanka

Embattled Media – Democracy, Governance and Reform in Sri Lanka

The book, to which I have contributed a chapter on new media, traces the evolution mass media in post-colonial Sri Lanka, with focus on the relevant policies and laws, and on journalism education. It discusses how the civil war continues to cast “a long shadow” on our media. Breaking free from that legacy is one of many challenges confronting the media industry today.

Some progress has been made since the Presidential election. The new government has taken steps to end threats against media organisations and journalists, and started or resumed criminal investigations on some past atrocities. Political websites that were arbitrarily blocked from are once again accessible. Journalists who went into exile to save their lives have started returning.

On the law-making front, meanwhile, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution recognized the right to information as a fundamental right. But the long-awaited Right to Information Bill could not be adopted before Parliament’s dissolution.

Thus much more remains to be done. For this, a clear set of priorities has been identified through recent consultative processes that involved media owners, practitioners, researchers, advocacy groups and trainers. These discussions culminated with the National Summit on Media Reforms organised by the Ministry of Media, the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI) and International Media Support (IMS), and held in Colombo on 13 and 14 May.

Parallel to this, there were two international missions to Sri Lanka (in March and May) by representatives of leading organisations like Article 19, UNESCO and the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ). I served as secretary to the May mission that met a range of political and media leaders in Colombo and Jaffna.

 Unfinished business

We can only hope that the next Parliament, to be elected at the August 17 general election, would take up the policy and law related aspects of the media reform agenda (while the media industry and profession tackles issues like capacity building and greater professionalism, and the education system works to enhance media literacy of everyone).

Pursuing these reforms needs both political commitment and persistent advocacy efforts.

 

  • Right to Information: The new Parliament should pass, on a priority basis, the Right to Information Bill that was finalised in May 2015 with inputs from media and civil society groups.

 

  • Media Self-Regulation: The Press Council Act 5 of 1973, which created a quasi-judicial entity called the Press Council with draconian powers to punish journalists, should be abolished. Instead, the self-regulatory body established in 2003, known as the Press Complaints Commission of Sri Lanka (PCCSL), should be strengthened. Ideally its scope should expand to cover the broadcast media as well.

 

  • Law Review and Revision: Some civil and criminal laws pose various restrictions to media freedom. These include the Official Secrets Act and sedition laws (both relics of the colonial era) and the draconian Prevention of Terrorism Act that has outlived the civil war. There are also needlessly rigid laws covering contempt of court and Parliamentary privileges, which don’t suit a mature democracy. All these need review and revision to bring them into line with international standards regarding freedom of expression.

 

  • Broadcast regulation: Our radio and TV industries have expanded many times during the past quarter century within an ad hoc legal framework. This has led to various anomalies and the gross mismanagement of the electromagnetic spectrum, a finite public property. Sri Lanka urgently needs a comprehensive law on broadcasting. Among other things, it should provide for an independent body to regulate broadcasting in the public interest, more equitable and efficient allocation of frequencies, and a three-tier system of broadcasting which recognises public, commercial and community broadcasters. All broadcasters – riding on the public owned airwaves — should have a legal obligation be balanced and impartial in coverage of politics and other matters of public concern.

 

  • Restructuring State Broadcasters: The three state broadcasters – the Sri Lanka Rupavahini Corporation (SLRC), the Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation (SLBC) and the Independent Television Network (ITN) – should be transformed into independent public service broadcasters. There should be legal provisions to ensure their editorial independence, and a clear mandate to serve the public (and not the political parties in office). To make them less dependent on the market, they should be given some public funding but in ways that don’t make them beholden to politicians or officials.

 

  • Reforming Lake House: Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited or Lake House was nationalised in 1973 to ‘broadbase’ its ownership. Instead, it has remained as a propaganda mill of successive ruling parties. Democratic governments committed to good governance should not be running newspaper houses. To redeem Lake House after more than four decades of state abuse, it needs to operate independently of government and regain editorial freedom. A public consultation should determine the most appropriate way forward and the best business model.

 

  • Preventing Censorship: No prior censorship should be imposed on the media. Where necessary, courts may review media content for their legality after publication (on an urgent basis). Laws and regulations that permit censorship should be reviewed and amended. We must revisit the Public Performance Ordinance, which empowers a state body to pre-approve all feature films and drama productions.

 

  • Blocking of Websites: Ensuring internet freedoms is far more important than setting up free public WiFi services. There should be no attempts to limit online content and social media activities contravening fundamental freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution and international conventions. Restrictions on any illegal content may be imposed only through the courts (and not via unwritten orders given by the telecom regulator). There should be a public list of all websites blocked through such judicial sanction.

 

  • Privacy and Surveillance: The state should protect the privacy of all citizens. There should be strict limits to the state’s surveillance of private individuals’ and private entities’ telephone conversations, emails and other electronic communications. In exceptional situations (e.g. crime investigations), such surveillance should only be permitted with judicial oversight and according to a clear set of guidelines.
Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Sri Lanka Cartoonist of the Year 2014

Cartoon by Awantha Artigala, Sri Lanka Cartoonist of the Year 2014

 Dealing with Past Demons

While all these are forward looking steps, the media industry as a whole also needs state assistance to exorcise demons of the recent past — when against journalists and ‘censorship by murder’ reached unprecedented levels. Not a single perpetrator has been punished by law todate.

This is why media rights groups advocate an independent Commission of Inquiry should be created with a mandate and adequate powers to investigate killings and disappearances of journalists and attacks on media organisations. Ideally, it should cover the entire duration of the war, as well as the post-war years.

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene is on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com