[Op-ed] Sri Lanka’s RTI ‘Glass’ is Slowly Filling Up

Op-ed published in Ceylon Today broadsheet newspaper on Sunday, 1 April 2018:

Sri Lanka’s RTI Glass is Slowly Filling Up

by Nalaka Gunawardene

In June 2016, Sri Lanka became the 108th country in the world to pass a law allowing citizens to demand information from the government. After a preparatory period of six months, citizens were allowed to exercise their newly granted Right to Information (RTI) by filing information applications from February 2017 onward.

Just over a year later, the results are a mixed bag of successes, challenges and frustrations. There have been formidable teething problems – some sorted out by now, while others continue to slow down the new law’s smooth operation.

On the ‘supply side’ of RTI, several thousand ‘public authorities’ at central, provincial and local government level had to get ready to practise the notion of ‘open government’.  This includes the all government ministries, departments, state corporations, other stator bodies and companies that are wholly or majority state owned. Despite training programmes and administrative circulars, there remain some gaps in officials’ attitudes, capacity and readiness to process citizens’ RTI applications.

To be sure, we should not expect miracles in one year after we have had 25 centuries of closed government under all the Lankan monarchs, colonial rulers and post-independence governments. RTI is a major conceptual and operational ‘leap’ for some public authorities and officials who have hidden or denied information rather than disclosed or shared it with the public.

Owing to this mindset, some officials have been trying to play hide-and-seek with RTI applications. Others are grudgingly abiding by the letter of the law — but not its spirit. These challenges place a greater responsibility on active citizens to pursue their RTI applications indefatigably.

During the first year of operation, the independent RTI Commission had received a little over 400 appeals from persistent citizens who refused to take ‘No’ for an answer. In a clear majority of cases heard so far, the Commission has ordered disclosure of information that was initially declined. These rulings are sending a clear message to all public authorities: RTI is not a choice, but a legal imperative. Fall in line, or else…

To ensure all public authorities comply with this law, it is vital to sustain citizen pressure. This is where the ‘demand side’ of RTI needs a lot more work. Unlike most other laws of the land that government uses, RTI is a rare law that citizens have to exercise – government only responds. Experience across Asia and elsewhere shows that the more RTI is used by people, the sharper and stronger it becomes.

It is hard to assess current public awareness levels on RTI without doing a large sample survey (one is being planned). However, there is growing anecdotal evidence to indicate that more Lankans have heard about RTI even if they are not yet clear on specifics.

But we still have plenty to do on the demand side: citizens need to see RTI as a tool for solving their local level problems – both private and public grievances – and be motivated to file more RTI applications. For this, they must overcome a historical deference towards government, and start demanding answers more vociferously.

Citizens who have been denied clear or any answers to their pressing problems – on missing persons, land rights, subsidies or public spending – are using RTI as an additional tool. We need to sustain momentum. RTI is a marathon, not a sprint.

Even though some journalists and editors were at the forefront in advocating for RTI in Sri Lanka for over two decades, the Lankan media as a whole is yet to grasp RTI’s potential.

Promisingly, some younger journalists have been producing impressive public interest stories – on topics as varied as disaster responses, waste management and human rights abuses – based on what they uncovered with their RTI applications. One of them, working for a Sinhala language daily, has filed over 40 RTI applications and experienced a success rate of around 70 per cent.

Meanwhile, some civil society groups are helping ordinary citizens to file RTI applications. A good example is the Vavuniya-based youth group, the Association for Friendship and Love (AFRIEL), that spearheads a campaign to submit RTI applications across Sri Lanka’s Northern Province, seeking information on private land that has been occupied by the military during the civil war and beyond. Sarvodaya, Sri Lanka’s largest development organisation, is running RTI clinics in different parts of the country with Transparency International Sri Lanka to equip citizens to exercise this new right.

The road to open government is a bumpy one, but there is no turning back on this journey. RTI in Sri Lanka may not yet have opened the floodgates of public information, but the dams are slowly but surely breached. Watch this space.

Disclosure: The writer works with both government and civil society groups in training and promoting RTI. These views are his own.

Advertisements

Comment: Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase our exposure to fake news?

Facebook Explore feed: Experiment ends

On 1 March 2018, Facebook announced that it was ending its six-nation experiment known as ‘Explore Feed’. The idea was to create a version of Facebook with two different News Feeds: one as a dedicated place with posts from friends and family and another as a dedicated place for posts from Pages.

Adam Mosseri, Head of News Feed at Facebook wrote: “People don’t want two separate feeds. In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family.”

An international news agency asked me to write a comment on this from Sri Lanka, one of the six countries where the Explore feed was tried out from October 2017 to February 2018. Here is my full text, for the record:

Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase

our exposure to fake news?

Comment by Nalaka Gunawardene, researcher and commentator on online and digital media; Fellow, Internet Governance Academy in Germany

Despite its mammoth size and reach, Facebook is still a young company only 14 years old this year. As it evolves, it keeps experimenting – mistakes and missteps are all part of that learning process.

But given how large the company’s reach is – with over 2 billion users worldwide – there can be far reaching and unintended consequences.

Last October, Facebook split its News Feed into two automatically sorted streams: one for non-promoted posts from FB Pages and publishers (which was called “Explore”), and the other for contents posted by each user’s friends and family.

Sri Lanka was one of six countries where this trial was conducted, without much notice to users. (The other countries were Bolivia, Cambodia, Guatemala, Serbia, Slovakia.)

Five months on, Facebook company has found that such a separation did not increase connections with friends and family as it had hoped. So the separation will end — in my view, not a moment too soon!

What can we make of this experiment and its outcome?

Humans are complex creatures when it comes to how we consume information and how we relate to online content. While many among us like to look up what our social media ‘friends’ have recommended or shared, we remain curious of, and open to, content coming from other sources too.

I personally found it tiresome to keep switching back and forth between my main news feed and what FB’s algorithms sorted under the ‘Explore’ feed. Especially on mobile devices – through which 80% of Lankan web users go online – most people simply overlooked or forgot to look up Explore feed. As a result, they missed out a great deal of interesting and diverse content.

For me as an individual user, a key part of the social media user experience is what is known as Serendipity – accidentally making happy discoveries. The Explore feed reduced my chances of Serendipity on Facebook, and as a result, in recent months I found myself using Facebook less often and for shorter periods of time.

For publishers of online newspapers, magazines and blogs, Facebook’s unilateral decision to cluster their content in the Explore feed meant significantly less visibility and click-through traffic. Fewer Facebook users were looking at Explore feed and then going on to such publishers’ content.

I am aware of mainstream media houses as well as bloggers in Sri Lanka who suffered as a result. Publishers in the other five countries reported similar experiences.

For the overall information landscape too, the Explore feed separation was bad news. When updates or posts from mainstream news media and socially engaged organisations were coming through on a single, consolidated news feed, our eyes and ears were kept more open. We were less prone to being confined to the chatter of our friends or family, or being trapped in ‘eco chambers’ of the likeminded.

Content from reputed news media outlets and bloggers sometimes comes with their own biases, for sure, but these act as a useful ‘bulwark’ against fake news and mind-rotting nonsense that is increasing in Sri Lanka’s social media.

It was thus ill-advised of Facebook to have taken such content away and tucked it in a place called Explore that few of us bothered to visit regularly.

The Explore experiment may have failed, but I hope Facebook administrators learn from it to fine-tune their platform to be a more responsive and responsible place for global cacophony to evolve.

Indeed, the entire Facebook is an on-going, planetary level experiment in which all its 2 billion plus members are participating. Our common challenge is to balance our urge for self-expression and sharing with responsibility and restraint. The justified limitations on free speech continue to apply on new media too.

[written on 28 Feb 2018]

Challenges of Regulating Social Media – Toby Mendel in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene

Some are urging national governments to ‘regulate’ social media in ways similar to how newspapers, television and radio are regulated. This is easier said than done where globalized social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are concerned, because national governments don’t have jurisdiction over them.

But does this mean that globalized media companies are above the law? Short of blocking entire platforms from being accessed within their territories, what other options do governments have? Do ‘user community standards’ that some social media platforms have adopted offer a sufficient defence against hate speech, cyber bullying and other excesses?

In this conversation, Lankan science writer Nalaka Gunawardene discusses these and related issues with Toby Mendel, a human rights lawyer specialising in freedom of expression, the right to information and democracy rights.

Mendel is the executive director of the Center for Law and Democracy (CLD) in Canada. Prior to founding CLD in 2010, Mendel was for over 12 years Senior Director for Law at ARTICLE 19, a human rights NGO focusing on freedom of expression and the right to information.

The interview was recorded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 5 July 2017.

[Interview] “අතේ තිබෙන ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එක තරම්වත් ස්මාට් නැති උදවිය ගොඩක් ඉන්නවා!”

I have just given an interview to Sunday Lakbima, a broadsheet newspaper in Sri Lanka (in Sinhala) on social media in Sri Lanka – what should be the optimum regulatory and societal responses. The interviewer, young and digitally savvy journalist Sanjaya Nallaperuma, asked intelligent questions which enabled me to explore the topic well.

This is part of my advocacy work as a fellow of the Internet Governance Academy.

Irida Lakbima, 14 May 2017 – Interview with Nalaka Gunawardene on Social Media in Sri Lanka

විද්‍යා ලේඛක හා ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය පර්යේෂක නාලක ගුණවර්ධන මෙරට තොරතුරු සමාජයේ නැගී ඒම ගැන වසර විස්සකට වැඩි කලක් තිස්සේ විචාරශීලීව ලියන කියන අයෙකි. ජර්මනිය කේන්ද්‍ර කර ගත් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් නියාමනය පිළිබඳ ජාත්‍යාන්තර ඇකඩමියේ සම්මානිත පර්යේෂකයෙකි.

 ලංකාවේ සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවි භාවිතය මොන වගේ තැනකද තිබෙන්නේ?

2017 ඇරඹෙන විට මෙරට ජනගහනයෙන් 30%ක් පමණ (එනම් මිලියන් 5ක් පමණ) නිතිපතා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරමින් සිටි බව රාජ්‍ය දත්ත තහවුරු කළා. එහෙත් එහි බලපෑම ඉන් ඔබ්බට විශාල ජන පිරිසකට විහිදෙනවා. වෙබ්ගත වන ගුරුවරුන්, මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හා සමාජ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයින් ලබන තොරතුරු ඔවුන් හරහා විශාල පිරිසකට සමාජගත වන නිසා.

අඩු තරමින් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය එකක්වත් භාවිත කරන අය මිලියන 3.5ක් පමණ මෙරට සිටිනවා. ෆේස්බුක් තමයි ජනප්‍රියම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාව. එයට අමතරව වැනි වේදිකා හරහා ද ලක්ෂ ගණනක් අය තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප බෙදා ගන්නවා (ෂෙයාර් කරනවා). මේ තමයි නූතන සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථය.

සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවිවල පළවන දේ ලංකා සමාජයට කොතරම් බලපෑමක් කරනවාද?

වෙබ් කියන්නේ ඉතා විශාල හා විවිධාකාර අවකාශයක්. සංකල්පීය නිරවුල් බව අවශ්‍යයි.

ප්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය (පුවත්පත් හා සඟරා, රේඩියෝ, ටෙලිවිෂන්) ආයතනවල නිල වෙබ් අඩවි තිබෙනවා. මේ කවුද – මොනවද කරන්නෙ කියා ප්‍රකටයි. මේවා රටේ නීතිරීතිවලට අනුකූලව පවත්වා ගෙන යන ව්‍යාපාරයි. උපමිතියකින් මා මේවා සම කරන්නේ සුපර්මාකට් වගේ කියායි.

ඊළඟට වෙබ්ගතව පමණක් පවතින ආයතනගත වූ මාධ්‍ය තිබෙනවා. සමහරක් මේවා රට තුළත් අනෙක්වා රටින් පිට සිටත් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා. සැවොම ලියාපදින්චි වීත් නැහැ (එසේ කිරීම මෙරට කිසිදු නීතියකින් අනිවාර්ය නැති නිසා). මේවායේ පූර්ණකාලීනව නියැලෙන අය සිටිනවා. කතුවරුන් ප්‍රකාශකයන් සමහර විට ප්‍රකට නැහැ. මගේ උපමිතියට අනුව මෙවන් වෙබ් අඩවි තනිව ඇති කඩ සාප්පු වගේ. මේවා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නොවේ!

ෆේස්බුක්, ට්විටර්, ඉන්ස්ටග්‍රෑම් වැනි සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා හරහා කැරෙන තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප හුවමාරු ඉහත කී දෙවර්ගයටම වඩා වෙනස්. මෙවන් වේදිකාවලට ඕනැම කෙනකුට නොමිළේ බැඳිය හැකියි. ඉහළ පරිගණක දැනුමක් ඕනැ නැහැ. යම් බසකින් ටයිප් කරන්න නම් දැනගත යුතුයි. මේවා මහජන සන්නිවේදන වේදිකා මිස ආයතනගතව හෝ වෘත්තීය මට්ටමින් කැරෙන මාධ්‍ය නොවෙයි. මගේ උපමිතියට අනුව කලබලකාරී පොලක කැරෙන ඝෝෂාකාරී ගනුදෙනු වගෙයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන කථා කරන බොහෝ දෙනා මේ තුන පටලවා ගන්නවා. අප නිරවුල්ව ප්‍රශ්න විග්‍රහ කිරීම ඉතා වැදගත්. වෙබ් අවකාශයේ අපට හමු වන “සුපිරි වෙළඳසැල්”, “කඩ” හා “පොල” යන තුනේම වාසි මෙන්ම අවාසිත් තිබෙනවා. ඒවා ගැන හරිහැටි දැනගෙන තමයි ගොඩවිය යුත්තේ!

ලංකාවේ අපි සමාජ ජාල වෙබ් අඩවි භාවිතා කරන්නේ ඇබ්බැහියක් විදියටද?

ඕනැම සමාජයක නව තාක්ෂණයකට, නව මාධ්‍යයකට සීමාන්තිකව සමීප වන සුළුතරයක් සිටිය හැකියි. ඒ අයට මනෝවිද්‍යාත්මක ප්‍රතිකාර අවශ්‍ය විය හැකියි. එහෙත් බහුතරයකට එසේ ඇලී ගැලී සිටින්නට කාලයත් නෑ. අසීමිතව දත්ත භාවිතයට වියදම් කරන්නත් බෑ!

Facebook වැනි ලංකාවේ ප්‍රචලිත සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල පළවන දෑ කොතරම් සත්‍යතාවයකින් යුතු දේද?

දිනපතා හුවමාරු වන තොරතුරු, අදහස් හා රූප /විඩියෝ කන්දරාව අතර හැම විදියේම දේ තිබෙනවා. ආ ගිය කතා, සතුටු සාමීචි, දේශපාලන වාද විවාද, සමාජ හා ආර්ථික කතා මෙන්ම අන්තවාදී ජාතිවාදය හෝ ආගම්වාදය පතුරුවන අන්තර්ගතයන් ද හමු වනවා.

මේවා සත්‍ය හෝ අසත්‍ය විය හැකියි. නැතිනම් ඒ දෙක අතර දෝලනය විය හැකියි. විචාරශීලීව මේවා ග්‍රහණය කරන්න අපේ බොහෝ දෙනා නොදන්න නිසා තමයි ප්‍රශ්න මතු වන්නේ. අපේ රටේ සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය තාමත් පහලයි. කුමන්ත්‍රණවාදී ප්‍රබන්ධ ගෙඩිපිටින් විශ්වාස කොට එය බෙදා ගන්නා (ෂෙයාර් කරන) පිරිස වැඩි එනිසයි.

ශ්‍රී ලංකාව හා සම්බන්ධ ව්‍යාජ පුවත් (Fake News) ෆේස්බුක් ඇතුළු සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඔස්සේ පළ වන අවස්ථා ද ද තිබෙනවා. “ශ්‍රී ලාංකිකයන්ට වීසා බලපත්‍ර නොමැතිව ඇමරිකාවට ඇතුළු වීමට අවසර ලබා දෙමින් එරට ජනාධිපති ට්‍රම්ප් විධායක නියෝගයකට අත්සන් තබා ඇති” බවට මීට සති කීපයකට පෙර පළ වූ වාර්තාව ඊට එක් උදාහරණයක්.

එම පුවත සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඔස්සේ විශාල වශයෙන් ‘share’ වූ අතර කොළඹ පිහිටි ඇමරිකානු තානාපති කාර්යාලය නිවේදනයක් නිකුත් කරමින් කියා සිටියේ ශ්‍රී ලංකාව සම්බන්ධයෙන් ඇමරිකානු වීසා ප්‍රතිපත්තියේ කිසිදු වෙනසක් සිදුව නොමැති බවයි.

සමහර මෙවන් ප්‍රබන්ධ අහිංසක වින්දනයක් ගෙන දිය හැකි වුවත් සෞඛ්‍යය හා අධ්‍යාපනය වැනි කරුණු අලලා ගොතන බොරු කථාවලින් සමාජ හානි සිදු වන්නට පුළුවන්.

 සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශය විසින් බරවා පරීක්ෂා කිරීමට කටයුතු කරන විට ඒඩ්ස් බෝ කරන ලේ පරීක්ෂාවක් යැයි විශාල මතවාදයක් පැතිර ගියේ ඇයි?

සෞඛ්‍යය ගැන බොහෝ දෙනා සැළකිලිමත්. එනිසා බොරු ප්‍රචාර පතුරුවන්නොත් එයට අදාල වන්නට වැර දරනවා. රටේ එක් ජාතියක පිරිමි හා ගැහැණුන් පමණක් වඳ කරන්න ගන්නා “උත්සාහයන්” ගැන මෙන්ම HIV/AIDS ගැනත් බොරු භීතිකා විටින්විට යම් පිරිස් පතුරුවනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවල ස්වභාවය අනුව කවුරු කොතනින් පටන් ගත්තා ද යන්න සොයා ගැනීම අති දුෂ්කරයි. මේවා පැතිර යාම හැකි තාක් අවම කර ගැනීම තමයි අපට කළ හැක්කේ. එසේ නැතිව වාරණ, තහන්චි හෝ බ්ලොක් කිරීම අපරිණත ක්‍රියාවක්.

එවැනි තොරතුරු සොයා බැලීමකින් තොරව හුවමාරු කරගැනීම පෙළඹෙන්නේ ඇයි?

අපේ පොතේ උගතුන් බොහෝ දෙනකු පවා අභව්‍ය යමක් කියා රවටන්න ලෙහෙසියි. ලක් සමාජයේ ජනප්‍රිය “නවීන බිල්ලෝ” හදා ගෙන තිබෙනවා. විදෙස් රහස් ඔත්තු සේවා, වතිකානුව, ඉන්දීය රජය, බහුජාතික සමාගම් වැනි යමක් ඈඳා ගනිමින් කුමන හෝ අභව්‍ය කථාවක් ගොතා මුදා හැරියොත් දිගට හරහට පැතිරෙනවා.

කටකථා වගේ තමයි. අද සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා කටකථාවලට උත්තේජක හෙවත් “ස්ටීරොයිඩ්” ලැබෙනවා වගේ වැඩක් වෙනවා.

අපේ රටේ වෙබ් භාවිත කරන්නන්ගෙන් 80%කට වඩා එහි පිවිසෙන්නේ ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හෝ වෙනත් ජංගම උපාංග හරහායි. බොහෝ විට කඩිමුඩියේ. සංශයවාදීව, දෙතුන් වතාවක් සිතා බලා යම් තොරතුරක් ග්‍රහණය කර ගන්න ඉස්පාසුවක් දුවන ගමන් සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට පිවිසෙන බොහෝ දෙනාට නෑ.

එවැන්නක් කරන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිතයට තරම් ලංකාවේ සමාජය දියුණු නැති නිසාද?

මා නිතර කියන පරිදි අපේ රටේ සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය තාමත් පහලයි.  අතේ තිබෙන ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එක තරම්වත් ස්මාට් නැති උදවිය ගොඩක් ඉන්නවා! මේක ව්‍යක්ත ලෙස සන්නිවේදනය වන අවස්ථාවක් මම පසුගියදා ෆේස්බුක් තුළම දැක්කා. එහි තිබුණේ මෙයයි: “ෆේස්බුක් එකේ share වන හැම මගුලම ඇත්ත කියා ගන්න එපා!” යැයි “1802 ජූනි 16 වනදා මහනුවර මගුල් මඩුවේදී” ශ්‍රී වික්‍රම රාජසිංහ රජතුමා කියයි. දැන් අපේ සමහර මිනිස්සු ඕකත් ඇත්ත කියලා share කරනවා!

උපහාසයෙන්වත් අපේ විචාරශීලී වෙබ් භාවිතය හා සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාවය වැඩි කර ගත යුතුයි. මෙය දිගු කාලීන වැඩක්. ඉක්මන් විසඳුම් මෙවන් සමාජ ප්‍රශ්නවලට නැහැ.

මේ විදියට අසත්‍ය ප්‍රචාර ප්‍රචලිත කිරීමට සමාජ ජාල භාවිතා කිරීමේ ඉදිරි ප්‍රවනතාවයන් මොන වගේ වෙයිද

තවත් උපමිතියකින් විග්‍රහ කරනවා නම් ෆේස්බුක් වේදිකාව  හරියට ගාලුමුවදොර පිටිය වගේ. පොදු, විවෘත අවකාශයක්. එතැනට යන අය ජාතික ගීය කියනවාද, බැති ගී කියනවාද, පෙම් ගී කියනවාද, හූ කියනවාද යන්න පුද්ගලයා මත තීරණය වන්නක්.

සමහර විට එක් අයෙක් පටන් ගත්තාම අවට ඉන්න ටික දෙනෙක් හොඳ හෝ නරක යමකට එක් වනවා. එයට වෙනස් ප්‍රතිචාරද තිබිය හැකියි. සමහරුන් කිසිවක් නොකියා, වික්ෂිප්තව ඔහේ බලා සිටීවි. තවත් අයෙක් ‘ඔහෙලාට ඔල්මාදයද මේ වගේ හූ කියන්න’ කියා එයට අභියෝග කරාවි.

අපට සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල උදක්ම ඕනෑ කරන්නේ භාවිත කරන ප්‍රජාව තුළින්ම සදාචාරත්මක, ධනාත්මක සන්නිවේදන සඳහා ඉල්ලුම වැඩි කිරීමටයි. හූ කියන අය කොතැනත් සිටිය හැකියි. එහෙත් ඒ අය කොන් වෙනවා නම් දිගටම එසේ කරන එකක් නැහැ.

“සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ආචාර ධර්ම ඕනෑ” යයි කෑමොර දෙන උදවියට මා කියන්නේ මුලින්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය මොනවාදැයි තේරුම් ගන්න කියායි. ගාලුමුවදොර පිටියට ආචාරධර්ම රාමුවක් නිර්දේශ කරනු වෙනුවට එහි යන එන අය අශීලාචාර හැසිරීම්වලින් වළක්වා ගන්න තැත් කිරීමයි වැදගත්. මෙය පොලිසිය, දණ්ඩන පනවා කරන්න පුළුවන් දෙයක් නොවෙයි.

අසත්‍ය පළවීම් හමුවේ සමාජ ජාල ප්‍රවේශමෙන් පරිහරණය කිරීමට අප කටයුතු කළ යුත්තේ කෙසේද?

සයිබර් සාක්ෂරතාව වැඩි කර ගැනීම හා භාවිත කරන ප්‍රජාව තුළින්ම ප්‍රමිතීන් (user community standards) ගොඩ නගා ගැනීම තමයි හොඳම මාර්ගය. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ අති බහුතරයක් සන්නිවේදන ප්‍රයෝජනවත් හා හරවත් ඒවා බව අමතක නොකරන්න.

එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා හරහා සිදුවන සන්නිවේදන ඉතා වැදගත් සමාජීය මෙහෙවරක් ඉටු කරනවා. වුවමනාවට වඩා බය පක්ෂපාතී වූ, අධිපතිවාදයන්ට නතු වූ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍යයට යම් තරමකට හෝ විකල්ප අවකාශයක් මතු වන්නේ වෙබ් හරහා ලියැවෙන බ්ලොග් රචනා හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනය තුළින්. බ්ලොග් අවකාශය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වන ‘ගරු සරු නැති ගතිය’ (irreverence) අප දිගටම පවත්වා ගත යුතුයි.

මේ ගතිය අධිපතිවාදී තලයන්හි සිටින අයට, නැතිනම් ජීවිත කාලයක් පුරා අධිපතිවාදය ප‍්‍රශ්න කිරීමකින් තොරව පිළි ගෙන සිටින ගතානුගතිකයන්ට හා මාධ්‍ය ලොක්කන්ට නොරිස්සීම අපට තේරුම් ගත හැකියි. ඔවුන් මැසිවිලි නගන්නේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නිසා සාරධර්ම බිඳ වැටනවා කියමින්. ඇත්තටම එහි යටි අරුත නම් පූජනීය චරිත ලෙස වැඳ ගෙන සිටින අයට/ආයතනවලට අභියෝග කැරෙන විට දෙවොලේ කපුවන් වී සිටින ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන්ට දවල් තරු පෙනීමයි!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පාලනය කරන්න යැයි ඔවුන් කෑගසන්නේ තම දේවාලේ ව්‍යාපාරවලට තර්ජනයක් මතු වීම හරහා කලබල වීමෙන්. මෙයින් මා කියන්නේ  ඕනෑම දෙයක් කීමට හෝ ලිවීමට ඉඩ දිය යුතුය යන්න නොවෙයි. එහෙත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය ඉතා සීරුවෙන් කළ යුත්තක් බවයි. නැතහොත් සමාජයක් ලෙස දැනට ඉතිරිව තිබෙන විවෘත සංවාද කිරීමට ඇති අවසාන වේදිකාවත් අධිපතිවාදයට හා සංස්කෘතික පොලිසියට නතු වීමේ අවදානම තිබෙනවා.

 

[Op-ed] April Fools, All Year Round? A Call for Fact-Checking Our Media & Politics

Text of my op-ed article published in Weekend Express newspaper on 7 April 2017.

April Fools All Year Round? Op-ed by Nalaka Gunawardene, Weekend Express, 7 April 2017

April Fools, All Year Round?

By Nalaka Gunawardene

April 1 is observed in many countries as a day for fooling people with practical jokes and harmless fabrications. This aspect of popular culture can be traced back to the times of ancient Greece.

There is now a new twist to this tradition. Every day is beginning to feel like April Fools’ Day in the age of Internet pranks, clever satire and fake news!

Sadly, many among us who apply some measure of skepticism on April 1 are not as vigilant for the rest of the year.

Ah, how I miss the time when intentional misleading was largely confined to just one day. I’m old enough to remember how some Lankan newspapers used to carry elaborate – and seemingly plausible – stories on their front pages on April Fools’ day. The now defunct Sun and Weekend excelled in that delightful art of the tall tale. Of course, they owned up the following day, poking fun at readers who were fooled.

During the past two decades, our media landscape has become a great deal more diverse. Today we have 24/7 SMS news services, all-news TV channels, numerous websites and, of course, millions using social media to spread information (or misinformation) instantaneously.

But does more necessarily mean better? That is a highly debatable question. We seem to have too much media, but not enough journalism! At least journalism of the classical kind where facts are sacred and comment is free (yet informed).

That kind of journalism still exists, but along with so much else. Today’s global cacophony has democratized the media (which is to be celebrated). At the same time, it spawned veritable cottage industries of fake news, conspiracy theories and gossip peddlers.

Image source – American Journalism Review, 21 April 2015

Fact checking

What is to be done? The long term solution is to raise media literacy skills in everyone, so that people consume media and social media with due diligence.

That takes time and effort. Since misinformation is polluting the public mind and even undermining democratic processes, we must also look for other, faster solutions.

One such coping strategy is fact checking. It literally means verifying information – before or after publication – in the media.

In a growing number of countries, mainstream media outlets practise fact checking as an integral part of their commitment to professionalism. They seek to balance accuracy with speed, which has been made more challenging by the never-ending news cycle.

In other cases, independent researchers or civil society groups are keeping track of news media content after publication. In the United States, where the practice is well developed, several groups are devoted to such post-hoc fact checking. These include FactCheck, PolitiFact, and NewsTrust’s Truth Squad. They fact check the media as well as statements by politicians and other public figures.

In 2015, fact checking organisations formed a world network and this year, they observed the inaugural International Fact Checking Day.

Not coincidentally, the chosen date was April 2. (See details at: http://factcheckingday.com)

The initiative is a collaboration by fact checkers and journalism organisations from around the world, “with a goal to enlist the public in the fight against misinformation in all its forms.”

“International Fact Checking Day is not a single event but a rallying cry for more facts — and fact checking — in politics, journalism and everyday life,” says Alexios Mantzarlis, director of the International Fact-Checking Network at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in the US.

Oops!

Pinocchios

One visual icon for the Fact-Checking Day is Pinocchio, the fictional puppet character whose nose grew long each time he uttered a lie.

We in Sri Lanka urgently need a professional, non-partisan fact checking service to save us from the alarming proliferation of Pinocchios in public life. Not just our politicians, but also many academics and activists who peddle outdated statistics, outlandish claims or outright conspiracy theories.

Take, for example, the recent claim by a retired professor of political science that 94 Members of Parliament had not even passed the GCE Ordinary Level exam. Apparently no one asked for his source at the press conference (maybe because it fed a preconceived notion). Later, when a (rare?) skeptical journalist checked with him, he said he’d “read it in a newspaper some time ago” — and couldn’t name the publication.

A simple Google search shows that an MP (Buddhika Pathirana) had cited this exact number in September 2014 – about the last Parliament!

Given the state of our media, which often takes down dictation rather than asks hard questions, fact checking is best done by a research group outside the media industry.

A useful model could be South Asia Check, an independent, non-partisan initiative by Panos South Asia anchored in Kathmandu. It “aims to promote accuracy and accountability in public debate” by examining statements and claims made by public figures in Nepal and occasionally, across South Asia (http://southasiacheck.org).

See also: Getting it Right: Fact-Checking in the Digital Age: American Journalism Review, 21 April 2015

South Asia Check – home page captured on 10 April 2017

Nalaka Gunawardene is a science writer and independent media researcher. He is active on Twitter as @NalakaG

Night of Ideas in Colombo: Panel on Freedom of Expression and Cartooning

L to R - Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

L to R – Kianoush Ramezani, Nalaka Gunawardene, Gihan de Chickera at Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

On 26 January 2017, the Alliance Française de Kotte with the Embassy of France in Sri Lanka presented the first ever “Night of Ideas” held in Colombo. During that event, participants were invited to engage in discussions on ‘‘A World in common – Freedom of Expression (FOE)” in the presence of French and Sri Lankan cartoonists, journalists and intellectuals.

I was part of the panel that also included: Kianoush Ramezani, Founder and President of United Sketches (Paris), an Iranian artist and activist living and working in Paris since 2009 as a political refugee; and Gihan de Chickera, Political cartoonist at the Daily Mirror newspaper in Sri Lanka. The panel was moderated by Amal Jayasinghe, bureau chief of Agence France Presse (AFP) news agency.

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas

Human Rights Lawyer and activist J C Weliamuna opens the Night of Ideas in Colombo, 26 January 2017

In my opening remarks, I paid a special tribute to Sri Lanka’s cartoonists and satirists who provided a rare outlet for political expression during the Rajapaksa regime’s Decade of Darkness (2005-2014).

I referred to my 2010 essay, titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter’ where I had highlighted this vital aspect of FOE. Here is the gist of it:

A useful barometer of FOE and media freedom in a given society is the level of satire that prevails. Satire and parody are important forms of political commentary that rely on blurring the line between factual reporting and creative license to scorn and ridicule public figures.

Political satire is nothing new: it has been around for centuries, making fun of kings, emperors, popes and generals. Over time, satire has manifested in many oral, literary and theatrical traditions. In recent decades, satire has evolved into its own distinctive genre in print, on the airwaves and online.

Satire offers an effective – though not always fail-safe – cover for taking on authoritarian regimes that are intolerant of criticism, leave alone any dissent. No wonder the former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc inspired so much black humour.

This particular dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest political commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis in the media is actually gossip.

A good summary of our panel discussion reported by Daily News, 30 January 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Part of the audience for Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Audience engages the panel during Night of Ideas at Alliance Française de Kotte, 26 Jan 2017

Night of Ideas in Colombo - promotional brochure

Night of Ideas in Colombo – promotional brochure