Avoiding ‘Cyber Nanny State’: Challenges of Social Media Regulation in Sri Lanka

Keynote speech delivered by science writer and digital media analyst Nalaka Gunawardene at the Sri Lanka National IT Conference held in Colombo from 2 to 4 October 2018.

Nalaka Gunawardene speaking at National IT Conference 2018 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Photo by ReadMe.lk

Here is a summary of what I covered (PPT embedded below):

With around a third of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people using at least one type of social media, the phenomenon is no longer limited to cities or English speakers. But as social media users increase and diversify, so do various excesses and abuses on these platforms: hate speech, fake news, identity theft, cyber bullying/harassment, and privacy violations among them.

Public discourse in Sri Lanka has been focused heavily on social media abuses by a relatively small number of users. In a balanced stock taking of the overall phenomenon, the multitude of substantial benefits should also be counted.  Social media has allowed ordinary Lankans to share information, collaborate around common goals, pursue entrepreneurship and mobilise communities in times of elections or disasters. In a country where the mainstream media has been captured by political and business interests, social media remains the ‘last frontier’ for citizens to discuss issues of public interest. The economic, educational, cultural benefits of social media for the Lankan society have not been scientifically quantified as yet but they are significant – and keep growing by the year.

Whether or not Sri Lanka needs to regulate social media, and if so in what manner, requires the widest possible public debate involving all stakeholders. The executive branch of government and the defence establishment should NOT be deciding unilaterally on this – as was done in March 2018, when Facebook and Instagram were blocked for 8 days and WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (to text only) owing to concerns that a few individuals had used these services to instigate violence against Muslims in the Eastern and Central Provinces.

In this talk, I caution that social media regulation in the name of curbing excesses could easily be extended to crack down on political criticism and minority views that do not conform to majority orthodoxy.  An increasingly insular and unpopular government – now in its last 18 months of its 5-year term – probably fears citizen expressions on social media.

Yet the current Lankan government’s democratic claims and credentials will be tested in how they respond to social media challenges: will that be done in ways that are entirely consistent with the country’s obligations under international human rights laws that have safeguards for the right to Freedom of Expression (FOE)? This is the crucial question.

Already, calls for social media regulation (in unspecified ways) are being made by certain religious groups as well as the military. At a recent closed-door symposium convened by the Lankan defence ministry’s think tank, the military was reported to have said “Misinformation directed at the military is a national security concern” and urged: “Regulation is needed on misinformation in the public domain.”

How will the usually opaque and unpredictable public policy making process in Sri Lanka respond to such partisan and strident advocacy? Might the democratic, societal and economic benefits of social media be sacrificed for political expediency and claims of national security?

To keep overbearing state regulation at bay, social media users and global platforms can step up arrangements for self-regulation, i.e. where the community of users and the platform administrators work together to monitor, determine and remove content that violates pre-agreed norms or standards. However, the presentation acknowledges that this approach is fraught with practical difficulties given the hundreds of languages involved and the tens of millions of new content items being published every day.

What is to be done to balance the competing interests within a democratic framework?

I quote the views of David Kaye, the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression from his June 2018 report to the UN Human Rights Council about online content regulation. He cautioned against the criminalising of online criticism of governments, religion or other public institutions. He also expressed concerns about some recent national laws making global social media companies responsible, at the risk of steep financial penalties, to assess what is illegal online, without the kind of public accountability that such decisions require (e.g. judicial oversight).

Kaye recommends that States ensure an enabling environment for online freedom of expression and that companies apply human rights standards at all  stages of their operations. Human rights law gives companies the tools to articulate their positions in ways that respect democratic norms and

counter authoritarian demands. At a minimum, he says, global SM companies and States should pursue radically improved transparency, from rule-making to enforcement of  the rules, to ensure user autonomy as individuals increasingly exercise fundamental rights online.

We can shape the new cyber frontier to be safer and more inclusive. But a safer web experience would lose its meaning if the heavy hand of government tries to make it a sanitized, lame or sycophantic environment. Sri Lanka has suffered for decades from having a nanny state, and in the twenty first century it does not need to evolve into a cyber nanny state.

Advertisements

Privacy Protection in the Digital Age: My interview with TV Derana English news

online is not absolute but relative: within that, we can & should determine how much of our personal data we want to give out when using . Beware of third party apps riding !

These sum up my remarks in an interview for the evening English news bulletin of TV Derana, currently Sri Lanka’s top ranked terrestrial TV channel. Broadcast on 22 March 2018.

 

Debating Social Media Block in Sri Lanka: Talk show on TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Aluth Parlimenthuwa live talk show on Social Media Blocking in Sri Lanka – TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Sri Lanka’s first ever social media blocking lasted from 7 to 15 March 2018. During that time, Facebook and Instagram were completely blocked while chat apps WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (no images, audio or video, but text allowed).

On 7 March 2018, the country’s telecom regulator, Telecommunications Regulatory Commission (TRCSL), ordered all telecom operators to impose this blocking across the country for three days, Reuters reported. This was “to prevent the spread of communal violence”, the news agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying. In the end, the blocking lasted 8 days.

For a short while during this period, Internet access was stopped entirely to Kandy district “after discovering rioters were using online messaging services like WhatsApp to coordinate attacks on Muslim properties”.

Both actions are unprecedented. In the 23 years Sri Lanka has had commercial Internet services, it has never imposed complete network shutdowns (although during the last phase of the civil war between 2005 and 2009, the government periodically shut down telephone services in the Northern and Eastern Provinces). Nor has any social media or messaging platforms been blocked before.

I protested this course of action from the very outset. Restricting public communications networks is ill-advised at any time — and especially bad during an emergency when people are frantically seeking reliable situation updates and/or sharing information about the safety of loved ones.

Blocking selected websites or platforms is a self-defeating exercise in any case, since those who are more digitally savvy – many hate peddlers among them –can and will use proxy servers to get around. It is the average web user who will be deprived of news, views and updates.

While the blocking was on, I gave many media interviews to local and international media. I urged the government “to Police the streets, not the web!”.

At the same time, I acknowledged and explained how a few political and religious extremist groups have systematically ‘weaponised’ social media in Sri Lanka during recent years. These groups have been peddling racially charged hate speech online and offline. A law to deal with hate speech has been in the country’s law books for over a decade. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) Act No 56 of 2007 prohibits the advocacy of ‘religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence’. This law, fully compliant with international human rights standards, has not been enforced.

On 14 March 2018, I took part in the ‘Aluth Parlimenthuwa’ TV talk show of TV Derana on this topic, where I articulated the above and related views. The other panelists were Deputy Minister Karu Paranawithana, presidential advisor Shiral Lakthilaka, Bar Association of Sri Lanka chairman U R de Silva, and media commentator Mohan Samaranayake.

Part 1:

Part 2:

 

Comment: Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase our exposure to fake news?

Facebook Explore feed: Experiment ends

On 1 March 2018, Facebook announced that it was ending its six-nation experiment known as ‘Explore Feed’. The idea was to create a version of Facebook with two different News Feeds: one as a dedicated place with posts from friends and family and another as a dedicated place for posts from Pages.

Adam Mosseri, Head of News Feed at Facebook wrote: “People don’t want two separate feeds. In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family.”

An international news agency asked me to write a comment on this from Sri Lanka, one of the six countries where the Explore feed was tried out from October 2017 to February 2018. Here is my full text, for the record:

Did Facebook’s “Explore” experiment increase

our exposure to fake news?

Comment by Nalaka Gunawardene, researcher and commentator on online and digital media; Fellow, Internet Governance Academy in Germany

Despite its mammoth size and reach, Facebook is still a young company only 14 years old this year. As it evolves, it keeps experimenting – mistakes and missteps are all part of that learning process.

But given how large the company’s reach is – with over 2 billion users worldwide – there can be far reaching and unintended consequences.

Last October, Facebook split its News Feed into two automatically sorted streams: one for non-promoted posts from FB Pages and publishers (which was called “Explore”), and the other for contents posted by each user’s friends and family.

Sri Lanka was one of six countries where this trial was conducted, without much notice to users. (The other countries were Bolivia, Cambodia, Guatemala, Serbia, Slovakia.)

Five months on, Facebook company has found that such a separation did not increase connections with friends and family as it had hoped. So the separation will end — in my view, not a moment too soon!

What can we make of this experiment and its outcome?

Humans are complex creatures when it comes to how we consume information and how we relate to online content. While many among us like to look up what our social media ‘friends’ have recommended or shared, we remain curious of, and open to, content coming from other sources too.

I personally found it tiresome to keep switching back and forth between my main news feed and what FB’s algorithms sorted under the ‘Explore’ feed. Especially on mobile devices – through which 80% of Lankan web users go online – most people simply overlooked or forgot to look up Explore feed. As a result, they missed out a great deal of interesting and diverse content.

For me as an individual user, a key part of the social media user experience is what is known as Serendipity – accidentally making happy discoveries. The Explore feed reduced my chances of Serendipity on Facebook, and as a result, in recent months I found myself using Facebook less often and for shorter periods of time.

For publishers of online newspapers, magazines and blogs, Facebook’s unilateral decision to cluster their content in the Explore feed meant significantly less visibility and click-through traffic. Fewer Facebook users were looking at Explore feed and then going on to such publishers’ content.

I am aware of mainstream media houses as well as bloggers in Sri Lanka who suffered as a result. Publishers in the other five countries reported similar experiences.

For the overall information landscape too, the Explore feed separation was bad news. When updates or posts from mainstream news media and socially engaged organisations were coming through on a single, consolidated news feed, our eyes and ears were kept more open. We were less prone to being confined to the chatter of our friends or family, or being trapped in ‘eco chambers’ of the likeminded.

Content from reputed news media outlets and bloggers sometimes comes with their own biases, for sure, but these act as a useful ‘bulwark’ against fake news and mind-rotting nonsense that is increasing in Sri Lanka’s social media.

It was thus ill-advised of Facebook to have taken such content away and tucked it in a place called Explore that few of us bothered to visit regularly.

The Explore experiment may have failed, but I hope Facebook administrators learn from it to fine-tune their platform to be a more responsive and responsible place for global cacophony to evolve.

Indeed, the entire Facebook is an on-going, planetary level experiment in which all its 2 billion plus members are participating. Our common challenge is to balance our urge for self-expression and sharing with responsibility and restraint. The justified limitations on free speech continue to apply on new media too.

[written on 28 Feb 2018]

Challenges of Regulating Social Media – Toby Mendel in conversation with Nalaka Gunawardene

Some are urging national governments to ‘regulate’ social media in ways similar to how newspapers, television and radio are regulated. This is easier said than done where globalized social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are concerned, because national governments don’t have jurisdiction over them.

But does this mean that globalized media companies are above the law? Short of blocking entire platforms from being accessed within their territories, what other options do governments have? Do ‘user community standards’ that some social media platforms have adopted offer a sufficient defence against hate speech, cyber bullying and other excesses?

In this conversation, Lankan science writer Nalaka Gunawardene discusses these and related issues with Toby Mendel, a human rights lawyer specialising in freedom of expression, the right to information and democracy rights.

Mendel is the executive director of the Center for Law and Democracy (CLD) in Canada. Prior to founding CLD in 2010, Mendel was for over 12 years Senior Director for Law at ARTICLE 19, a human rights NGO focusing on freedom of expression and the right to information.

The interview was recorded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 5 July 2017.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #276: අසාර්ථක වූ තුර්කි කුමන්ත්‍රණයෙන් මතු වන නවීන සන්නිවේදන පාඩම්

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in the print issue of 24 July 2016), I discuss the role of new communications technologies and social media during the coup d’état that was attempted in Turkey against the government on the night of on 15 July 2016.

The attempt was carried out by a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves under a council called the Peace at Home Council. Reasons for its failure have been widely discussed.

Citizen resistance to Turkey coup on 16 July 2016 - wire service photos

Citizen resistance to Turkey coup on 16 July 2016 – wire service photos

As Zeynep Tufekci, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science, described in a New York Times op-ed on 20 July 2016: “In the confusing hours after the coup attempt began, the country had heard from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan — and even learned that he was alive — when he called a television station via FaceTime, an easy-to-use video chat app. As the camera focused on the iPhone in the anchor’s hand, the president called on the people of Turkey to take to the streets and guard the airports. But this couldn’t happen by itself. People would need WhatsApp, Twitter and other tools on their phones to mobilize. The president also tweeted out the call to his more than eight million followers to resist the coup.”

She added: “The journalist Erhan Celik later tweeted that the public’s response had deterred potential coup supporters, especially within the military, from taking a side…Meanwhile, the immediacy of the president’s on-air appeal via FaceTime was an impetus for people to take to the streets. The video link protected the government from charges that it was using fraud or doctoring — both common in the Turkish news media — to assure the public that the president was safe. A phone call would not have worked the same way.”

I discuss the irony of a leader like Erdogan, who has been cracking down on independent media practitioners and social media users, had to rely on these very outlets in his crucial hour of need.

I echo the views of Zeynep Tufekci for not just Turkey but other countries where autocratic rulers are trying to censor the web and control the media: “The role of internet and press freedoms in defeating the coup presents a significant opportunity. Rather than further polarization and painting of all dissent as illegitimate, the government should embrace real reforms and reverse its censorship policies.”

See also: How the Internet Saved Turkey’s Internet-Hating President

Photo from The Daily Beast

Photo from The Daily Beast

කුමන හෝ හේතුවක් නිසා රටක දේශපාලන බලය බලහත්කාරයෙන් අත්කර ගැනීමට එරට හමුදාවට නීතිමය හෝ සදාචාරාත්මක අයිතියක් නැහැ.

එහෙත් විටින් විට ලෝකයේ විවිධ රටවල හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණ සිදුවනවා. දකුණු ආසියානු කලාපයේ බංග්ලාදේශය හා පාකිස්ථානය මේ අමිහිරි අත්දැකීම් රැසක් ලබා තිබෙනවා.

යුරෝපය හා ආසියාව හමු වන තැන පිහිටි තුර්කියේ මීට දින කීපයකට පෙර අසාර්ථක වූ හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණයට මා අවධානය යොමු කළේ නවීන සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් එහි වැදගත් භූමිකාවක් ඉටු කළ නිසායි.

නව මාධ්‍යයන් හරහා කුමන්ත්‍රණයට එරෙහිව මහජනයා පෙළ ගැස්වීමට එරට නායකයා සමත් වුණා. විශාල අවි හා සෙබල බල පරාක්‍රමයක් සතු හමුදාවක් ජන බලය හා සන්නිවේදන හැකියාව හරහා ආපසු බැරැක්කවලට යැවීමට හැකි වීම විමසා බැලිය යුතු සංසිද්ධියක්.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය මාස ගණනක් සිට සූක්ෂ්ම ලෙසින් සැලසුම් කරන ලද බව හෙළි වී තිබෙනවා. රටට සාමය සඳහා සභාව (Peace at Home Council) ලෙසින් සංවිධානය වූ තුර්කි හමුදාවේ කොටසක් තමයි මේ උත්සාහයේ යෙදුණේ.

එහි අක්මුල් තවමත් හරිහැටි පැහැදිලි නැහැ. එහෙත් 2016 ජූලි 15-16 දෙදින තුළ ඔවුන් රටේ බලය අල්ලා ගන්නට ප්‍රචණ්ඩව තැත් කළා.

තුර්කි ජනාධිපති රෙචෙප් ටයිප් අර්ඩොගන් (Recep Tayyip Erdoğan) කෙටි නිවාඩුවකට අගනුවරින් බැහැරව, මර්මාරිස් නම් පිටිසර නිවාඩු නිකේතනයේ සිිටියා. ජූලි 15-16 මධ්‍යම රාත්‍රියට ආසන්නව යුද්ධ ටැංකි එරට අගනුවර අන්කාරා, විශාලතම නගරය වන ඉස්තාන්බුල් හා තවත් ප්‍රධාන නගරවලට ඇතුළු වුණා. ප්‍රහාරක ගුවන් යානා පහළින් පියාසර කළා.

තම බලය පෙන්වීමට හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවෝ කිහිප පොළක ප්‍රහාර දියත් කළා. රටේ පාර්ලිමේන්තු මන්දිරයට හා ජනාධිපති මැදුරට හානි සිදු කෙරුණා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන්ගේ එක් ඉලක්කයක් වූයේ ජනාධිපතිවරයා අත්අඩංගුවට ගැනීම හෝ මරා දැමීමයි. එහෙත් කුමන්ත්‍රණය ගැන දැන ගත් වහාම ඔහුගේ ආරක්ෂක පිරිස ඔහු නැවතී සිටි නිවාඩු නිකේතනයෙන් රහසිගත තැනකට ගෙන ගියා.

මැදියම් රැය පසු වූ විගස රාජ්‍ය රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් (TRT) ආයතනයට ඇතුලු වූ හමුදා පිරිසක්, එහි සිටි නිවේදකයන්ට ප්‍රකාශයක් කියවන මෙන් බලකර සිටියා. ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය හා නිර්ආගමික පාලනය රටේ යළි ස්ථාපිත කිරීමට හමුදාව බලය පවරා ගන්නා බව එහි සඳහන් වුණා. තාවකාලිකව මාෂල් නීතිය ක්‍රියාත්මක කරන බවත්, නව ව්‍යවස්ථාවක් ළඟදීම හඳුන්වා දෙන බවත් හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවෝ රටට ප්‍රකාශ කළා.

The Turkish president spoke to local television with his office unwilling to confirm his location, simply saying he is safe

The Turkish president spoke to local television with his office unwilling to confirm his location, simply saying he is safe

පාන්දර 3.10 වනවිට තමන් රටේ සමස්ත පාලන බලය සියතට ගෙන ඇති බව කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් ලොවට කීවත් එය එසේ වූයේ නැහැ. ජනාධිපති අර්ඩොගන් හා අගමැති බිනාලි යිල්දිරිම් (Binali Yıldırım) ඒ තීරණාත්මක අලුයම පැය කිහිපයේ තීක්ෂණ ලෙසින් සිය ප්‍රතිරෝධය දියත් කළා.

හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් දේශපාලනික හා සම්ප්‍රදායික රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය මර්මස්ථාන මුලින් ඉලක්ක කළ නමුත් නව සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් හා නව මාධ්‍ය ගැන අවධානයක් යොමු කළේ නැහැ. පළපුරුදු හා සටකපට දේශපාලකයකු වන තුර්කි ජනාධිපතිවරයා මේ දුර්වලතාව සැනෙකින් වටහා ගත්තා.

තුර්කිය විශාල රටක්. ලෝක බැංකු දත්තවලට අනුව එරට මිලියන 80කට ආසන්න ජනගහනයෙන් බාගයකට වඩා (58%) ඉන්ටනෙට් භාවිත කරනවා. මෙයින් බහුතරයක් ස්මාට්ෆෝන් හිමිකරුවන්. 2015 අග වනවිට එරට ජංගම දුරකථන සක්‍රීය ගිණුම් මිලියන 73ක් තිබුණා.

හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණය ගැන දැන ගත් වහාම ජනාධිපතිවරයා තමාට හිතවත් හමුදා ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ නිලධාරීන් ගැන තක්සේරු කරන අතරම සන්නිවේදන ජාල හරහා තුර්කි ජනයා වෙත ආයාචනා කිරීමට තීරණය කළා. මේ සඳහා අවශ්‍ය වූ ව්‍යාපාරික සබඳතා හා තාක්ෂණික දැනුම ඔහුගේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය සතුව තිබුණා.

සියල්ල පාන්දර යාමයේ සිදු වුණත් ඉක්මනින් ක්‍රියාත්මක වීමේ වැදගත්කම ජනාධිපතිගේ හිතවත් පිරිස දැන සිටියා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා, ටෙලිකොම් සමාගම් හෝ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල සියතට ගැනීමට මුල් වටයේ කිසිදු උත්සාහයක් ගත්තේ නැහැ. මහජන ඡන්දයෙන් පත්වූ තම රජය රැක ගන්නට වීදි බසින්න යැයි ජනාධිපතිවරයා මේ මාධ්‍ය හරහා යළි යළිත් ඉල්ලා සිටියා.

මුලින්ම රටේ සියලුම ජංගම දුරකථන ග්‍රාහකයන් වෙත කෙටි පණ්වුඩයක් යවමින් ජනපති අර්ඩොගන් කීවේ හැකි සෑම අයුරකින්ම කුමන්ත්‍රණයට විරෝධය දක්වන්න කියායි.

NINTCHDBPICT000252431176

ඒ අනුව ඉස්ලාම් බහුතර (96.5%) එරටෙහි ආගමික ස්ථාන ලවුඩ්ස්පීකර් හරහා විශේෂ යාඥා විසුරු වන්නට පටන් ගත්තා. අවේලාව නොබලා බොහෝ ජනයා වීදි බැස්සා.

ප්‍රධාන නගරවල වීදිවලට පිරුණු ජනයා බහුතරයක් පාලක පක්ෂයේ අනුගාමිකයන් වුවද සියලු දෙනා එසේ වූයේ නැහැ. කොතරම් අඩුපාඩු හා අත්තනෝමතික හැසිරීම් තිබුණද බහුතර ඡන්දයකින් පත් වූ රජයක් පෙරළීමට හමුදාවට කිසිදු වරමක් හෝ අවසරයක් නැතැයි විශ්වාස කළ අයද එහි සිටියා.

තුර්කියේ හමුදාව යනු බලගතු ආයතනයක්ග එම හමුදාව රාජ්‍ය පාලනයට මැදිහත් වීමේ කූප්‍රකට ඉතිහාසයක් තිබෙනවා. 1960 මැයි මාසයේ, 1971 මාර්තුවේ හා 1980 සැප්තැම්බරයේ හමුදා කුමන්ත්‍රණ සාර්ථක වී මිලිටරි පාලන බිහි වුණා. 1995දී ඡන්දයෙන් පත් වූ හවුල් රජයට 1977දී හමුදාව ‘නිර්දේශ’ ගණනක් ඉදිරිපත් කොට ඒවා පිළි ගන්නට බලපෑම් කළා. මේ මෑත ඉතිහාසය ජනතාවට මතකයිග

තුර්කි රාජ්‍යය නිර්ආගමිකයි (secular state). එහෙත් මෑත කාලයේ ඉස්ලාමීය දේශපාලන පක්ෂ වඩාත් ජනප්‍රිය වීම හරහා රාජ්‍ය පාලනයේ ඉස්ලාමීය නැඹුරුවක් හට ගෙන තිබෙනවා.

හමුදාව මෙයට කැමති නැහැ. ව්‍යවස්ථාවෙන්ම ප්‍රකාශිත පරිදි රාජ්‍යය තව දුරටත්  නිර්ආගමික විය යුතු බවත්, ඉස්ලාම්වාදීන් බලගතු වීම සීමා කළ යුතු බවත් හමුදාවේ මතයයි. මෙය මතවාදී අරගලයකට සීමා නොවී දේශපාලන බල අරගලයකට තුඩු දී තිබෙනවා. 2016 කුමන්ත්‍රණයේ පසුබිම සංකීර්ණ වුවද ආගමික-නිර්ආගමික ගැටුමද එහි එක් වැදගත් සාධකයක්.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් නිවාඩු නිකේතනයට පහර දීමට කලින් එතැනින් පලා ගිය ජනාධිපති අර්ඩොගන්, සැඟවී නොසිට  හිරු උදා වන විට එරට විශාලතම ජාත්‍යන්තර ගුවන් තොටුපළ වන ඉස්තාන්බූල් ගුවන් තොටුපළට සිය නිල ගුවන් යානයෙන් පැමිණියා. මැදියම් රැයේ ටික වේලාවකට කුමන්ත්‍රණකාරීන් අත්පත් කර ගත් ගුවන් තොටුපළ ඒ වන විට යළිත් හිතවත් හමුදා අතට පත්ව තිබුණා.

ගුවන් තොටුපළේ සිට මාධ්‍යවේදියකුගේ ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එකක් හරහා ජනාධිපතිවරයා එරට පෞද්ගලික ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවක් වූ CNN Turkට සජීව ලෙසින් සම්බන්ධ වුණා.

‘ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදය රැක ගන්න නගරවල වීදි හා චතුරස්‍රවලට එක් රොක් වන්න. මේ කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් අපට ඉක්මනින් ඉවත් කළ හැකි වේවි. ඔවුන්ට නිසි පිළිතුර දෙන්න ඕනෑ අපේ මහජනතාවයි’ ඔහු ආයාචනා කළා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් නොසිතූ විලසින් මේ පණිවුඩ ඉතා ඉක්මනින් එරට ජනයා අතර පැතිර ගියා. ෆේස්බුක්, ට්විටර් හා අනෙක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල මෙයට මහත් සේ දායක වුණා.

මේ අතර ජනපති කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගනිමින් ජනපතිවරයා ආරක්ෂිත බවත්, ඔහු කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන්ට එරෙහිව කරන අරගලයට ඍජුව නායකත්වය දෙන බවත්, ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට හා විදෙස් රටවලට දැනුම් දුන්නා.

හමුදාව බලය ඇල්ලීමට තැත් කිරීම කෙතරම් තුර්කි වැසියන් කුපිත කළාද කිවහොත් සමහර ස්ථානවල යටත් වූ කුමන්ත්‍රණකාමී හමුදා සෙබලුන් හා නිලධාරීන්ට සාමාන්‍ය ජනයා වට කර ගෙන පහර දෙනු ලැබුවා. ඔවුන් ප්‍රසිද්ධ නිග්‍රහවලට ලක් වුණා.

CncnmhQXEAApKN0

යම් අවස්ථාවක කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් CNN Turk පෞද්ගලික නාලිකාව නිහඬ කිරීමට ද තැත් කළා. ඇමරිකානු CNN මාධ්‍ය ජාලය හා තුර්කි සමාගමක් හවුලේ කරන මේ නාලිකාව හමුදා බලපෑම් ප්‍රතික්ෂේප කළා. දිගටම සිය සජීව විකාශයන් කර ගෙන ගියා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය දියත් කොට පැය 24ක් ගතවීමට පෙර රටේ පාලන බලය යළිත් ඡන්දයෙන් පත් වූ රජය යටතට මුළුමනින්ම ගැනීමට ජනපති-අගමැති දෙපළ සමත් වුණා.

ඉන් පසුව කුමන්ත්‍රණයට සම්බන්ධ දහස් ගණනක් හමුදා නිලධාරීන් හා සිවිල් වැසියන් අත්අඩංගුවට ගනු ලැබුවා. මේ අය අධිකරණ ක්‍රියාදාමයකට ලක්වනු ඇති. මේ බොහෝ දෙනකු නොමඟ ගිය හමුදා නිලධාරීන් හා ඔවුන්ගේ හිතවත් පරිපාලන නිලධාරීන් බව පසුව හඳුනාගනු ලැබුවා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණය අසාර්ථක වීමට හේතු දේශපාලන විචාරකයෝ තවමත් සමීපව අධ්‍යයනය කරනවා. ඔවුන් පිළිගන්නා එක් දෙයක් තිබෙනවා. 20 වන සියවසේ බොහෝ අවස්ථාවල විවිධ රටවල සාර්ථක වූ බලය ඇල්ලීමේ ආකෘතියක් මෙවර තුර්කියේදී ව්‍යර්ථ වූයේ 21 වන සියවසේ සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් නිසා බවයි.

‘කුමන්ත්‍රණකරුවන් පොතේ හැටියට සියල්ල සැලසුම් කොට ක්‍රියාත්මක වුණා. රාජ්‍ය නායකයා අගනුවරින් බැහැරව සිටි, සිකුරාදා රැයකයි ඔවුන් බලය අල්ලන්න තැත් කළේ. ඒත් ඔවුන්ගේ අවාසියට ඔවුන් භාවිත කළ වට්ටටෝරුව යල් පැන ගිහින්.’ යයි ඉස්තාන්බුල් නුවර පර්යේෂකයකු වන ගැරත් ජෙන්කින්ස් කියනවා.

මේ සමස්ත සිදුවීම් දාමයේ ඉතාම උත්ප්‍රාසජනක පැතිකඩ මෙයයි. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාතික ආරක්ෂාවට තර්ජනයක් යයි කියමින් ඒවා හෙළි දැකීමට හා විටින් විට ඒවා බ්ලොක් කිරීමට පුරුදුව සිටි අර්ඩොගන් ජනපතිවරයාට තීරණාත්මක මොහොතේ ඒවා ඉමහත් ලෙස ප්‍රයෝජනවත් වීමයි.

මේක ඇත්තටම කන්නට ඕනෑ වූ විට කබරගොයාත් තලගොයා වීමේ කතාවක්.

A man stands in front of a Turkish army tank at Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey July 16, 2016. REUTERS/IHLAS News Agency

A man stands in front of a Turkish army tank at Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey July 16, 2016. REUTERS/IHLAS News Agency

2003-2014 කාලයේ තුර්කි අගමැතිව සිටි අර්ඩොගන් 2014දී ජනාධිපතිවරණයට ඉදිරිපත් වී ප්‍රකාශිත ඡන්දවලින් 51.79%ක් ලබමින් ජය ගත්තා. ඔහු තමා වටා විධායක බලය කේන්ද්‍ර කර ගනිමින්, විපක්ෂවලට හිරිහැර කරමින් ඒකාධිපති පාලනයක් ගෙන යන බවට චෝදනා නැගෙනවා. මාධ්‍ය නිදහසට හා පුරවැසියන්ට ප්‍රකාශන නිදහසටත් ඔහුගේ රජයෙන් නිතර බාධා පැමිණෙනවා.

නිල මාධ්‍ය වාරණයක් හා නොනිල මාධ්‍ය මර්දනයක් පවත්වා ගෙන යාම නිසා තුර්කිය ජාත්‍යන්තර ප්‍රජාවේ හා මාධ්‍ය නිදහස පිළිබඳ ක්‍රියාකාරිකයන්ගේ දැඩි දෝෂ දර්ශනයට ලක්ව සිටින රටක්.

තමන්ගේ අධිපතිවාදය ප්‍රශ්න කරන, විකල්ප මතවලට ඉඩ දෙන දෙස් විදෙස් මාධ්‍ය අර්ඩොගන් සලකන්නේ සතුරන් ලෙසයි. එහෙත් රාජ්‍ය මාධ්‍ය පැය කිහිපයකට ඔහුගේ පාලනයෙන් ගිලිහී ගිය විට ඔහුගේ උදව්වට ආවේ ඔහු නිතර දෙස් තබන පෞද්ගලික විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය හා විදෙස් මාධ්‍යයි.

2014දී ඔහු නව නීතියක් හඳුන්වා දුන්නේ ඕනෑම මොහොතක වෙබ් අඩවි බ්ලොක් කිරීමේ බලය රජයට පවරා ගනිමින්.

එසේම අර්ඩොගන් දෙබිඩි පිළිවෙතක් අනුගමනය කරන්නෙක්. සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට නිතර දෙවේලේ බැණ වදින ඔහු තමාගේ ට්විටර් හා ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් පවත්වා ගෙන යනවා. ට්විටර් නිල ගිණුමට මේ වන විට මිලියන 8කට වඩා අනුගාමිකයන් සිටිනවා. කුමන්ත්‍රණය දිග හැරෙන අතර සිය ජනයාට හා ලෝකයට කතා කරන්නට ඔහු ට්විටර් ගිණුමද යොදා ගත්තා.

මේ දෙබිඩි හැසිරීම අපේත් එක්තරා හිටපු පාලකයෙක් සිිහිපත් කරනවා!

කුමන්ත්‍රණයට එරෙහිව අර්ඩොගන් රජයට උපකාර වූ තවත් සාධකයක් පසුව හෙළි වුණා. කුමන්ත්‍රණය ඇරඹී ටික වේලාවකින් එරට ප්‍රධානම ජංගම දුරකථන ජාලය සියලුම ග්‍රාහකයන්ට නොමිලයේ දත්ත සම්ප්‍රේෂණ පහසුකම් ලබා දුන්නා. නූතන දේශපාලන ක්‍රියාකාරකම්වලදී ටෙලිවිෂන් හා රේඩියෝවලට වඩා ටෙලිකොම් සේවාවන් වැදගත් වන බව මේ හරහා අපට පෙනී යනවා.

කුමන්ත්‍රණයේ සන්නිවේදන සාධකය විග්‍රහ කරමින් නිව්යෝර්ක් ටයිම්ස් පත්‍රයට ජූලි 20 වනදා ලිපියක් ලියූ තුර්කි සම්භවය සහිත ඇමරිකානු සරසවි ඇදුරු සෙයිනප් ටුෆෙකි (Zeynep Tufekci) මෙසේ කියනවා.

‘කුමන්ත්‍රණය පරදවන්න ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍ය හා වෙබ්ගත නව මාධ්‍ය ලබා දුන් දායකත්වය ජනපති අර්ඩොගන් අගය කළ යුතුයි. දැන්වත් මාධ්‍ය වාරණය, මර්දනය හා නවමාධ්‍ය හෙළා දැකීම නතර කොට ප්‍රකාශන නිදහසට ගරු කරන දේශපාලන ප්‍රතිසංස්කරණවලට යොමු විය යුතුයි… ස්වාධීන මාධ්‍යයන් හා විවෘත ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සංස්කෘතියක් පැවතීම රටක ප්‍රජාතන්ත්‍රවාදයට මහත් සවියක් බව මේ අත්දැකීමෙන් අපට හොඳටම පෙනී යනවා.’

How the Internet Saved Turkey’s Internet-Hating President

People stand on a Turkish army tank in Ankara on July 16 - Reuters

People stand on a Turkish army tank in Ankara on July 16 – Reuters

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #258: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය මොනවාදැයි නොදැන ඉබාගාතේ දොස් කියන්නෝ

Social media bashing is a popular sport among media critics and others in Sri Lanka. Sadly, some have no clear idea what social media is (and isn’t), thus conflating this category of web content with others like news websitea and gossip websites.

In this week’s Ravaya column (appearing in issue of 21 February 2016), I try to explain this basic categorization along with a brief history of the web and web 2.0. I also reiterate the basic user precautions for social media users where the motto us: user beware!

Digital futures

“බලන්න මේ සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයන්ගේ කසි කබල් ගොසිප්වල හැටි! මාධ්‍ය ආචාර ධර්ම රකින්නෙ කොහොමද මේ රොත්ත එක්ක?”

මෑතදී එසේ මට කීවේ අප අතර සිටින ප්‍රවීන හිටපු පත්‍ර කතුවරයෙක්. ඔහු එයට උදාහරණ ලෙස ඕපාදූප පළ කරන ජනප්‍රිය දේශීය පුවත් වෙබ් අඩවි කිහිපයක නම් කීවා. එහෙත් ඉන් එකක්වත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය (social media) නොවෙයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හෙවත් වෙබ්ගත සමාජ ජාලවලට දොස් පැවරීම දැන් විලාසිතාවක් වෙලා. රටේ සිදු වන ළමා අපචාර, ලිංගික අපරාධ, සිය දිවි නසා ගැනීම් මෙන් ම, තමන් නොරිසි ප‍්‍රතිඵල ගෙන දෙන දේශපාලන පෙරළිවලදී පවා සමහරුන් වගකීම පවරන්නේ ෆේස්බුක් ප‍්‍රධාන සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලටයි.

2015 අග වන විට ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් මිලියන් 1,500ක් පමණ ලොව රටවල් 150කට වැඩි සංඛ්‍යාවක විසිරුණු ජනයා විසින් අරඹා තිබුණා. මේ අතර ලාංකිකයන් පවත්වාගෙන යන ෆේස්බුක් ගිණුම් මිලියන් 3ක් පමණ ද තිබෙනවා.

“අපේකම” නැති කිරීමේ සූක්ෂම විජාතික කුමන්ත‍්‍රණයක කොටසක් ලෙසත් සමහරුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය දකිනවා. පිටරටින් ආ දෙයක් නිසාත්, බටහිර රටවලින් පැන නැගුණු නිසාත් ෆේස්බුක් සැක කරන අය අතර නිරතුරු එහි සැරිසරන උදවිය මෙන්ම කිසිදා එහි නොගිය, එය කුමක්දැයි හරිහැටි නොදන්නා අයත් සිටිනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට මෙතරම් බිය වන්නේත්, දොස් තබන්නේත් ඇයි? මේ භීතිය නියෝජනය කරන්නේ ගතානුගතිකත්වය හා නූතනත්වය අතර සදාකාලික ගැටුම ද?

අලූතෙන් නැතිනම් සාපේක්ෂව මෑතදී මතුව ආ සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන් හා මාධ්‍යයන් කරුණු විමසීමකින් පවා තොරව, ගෙඩි පිටින් හෙළා දැකීම අපේ සමහරුන්ගේ සිරිතයි. චිත‍්‍රකතා, ටෙලිවිෂන්, ජංගම දුරකථන, ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වැනි හැම රැල්ලකට ම එරෙහිව අවිචාරශීලී විරෝධතා එල්ල වුණා. මේ සම්ප‍්‍රදායේ අලූත්ම ඉලක්කය වී ඇත්තේ වෙබ්ගත සමාජ මාධ්‍යයි.

16 July 2012: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #75: චිත‍්‍රකථා භීතියේ අළුත් ම මුහුණුවර ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ද?

 28 March 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #162: ජංගම දුරකථනයට තවමත් ඔරවන අපේ හනමිටිකාරයෝ

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය මොනවා ද කියා හරිහැටි නොදන්නා හෝ නිරවුල් අවබෝධයක් නැති අයත් මෙසේ විවේචන එල්ල කිරීම හාස්‍යජනකයි. එවන් අය අතර පොතේ උගත්තු, පූජකයන් සහ ජන මතය හසුරුවන චරිතයන් ද සිටිනු දැකීම ඛේදජනකයි.

වෙබ් අවකාශය ගැන විවේචනයක යෙදීමට පෙර අඩු තරමින් එහි මූලික ගති සොබා හා එතුළ හමු වන අන්තර්ගතයේ මුල් පෙළේ වර්ගීකරණය ගැන මූලික වැටහීමක් හෝ තිබීම වැදගත්.

ගෙවී ගිය 2015 වසරේ ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරීන්, සිවිල් සමාජ කි‍්‍රයාකාරිකයන්, සරසවි සිසුන්, මාධ්‍යවේදීන් ඇතුලූ ලාංකිකයන් විශාල සංඛ්‍යාවකට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පිළිබඳ මූලික අවබෝධයක් ලබා දෙන්නට මා දේශන පැවැත්වූවා. ඔවුන් සමග කළ සංවාද වලින් හෙළි වූයේ නිතර දෙවේලේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන සමහරුන්ට පවා ඒවායේ සීමා පරාසයන් ගැන හරි වැටහීමක් නොමැති බවයි.

වෙබ් (World Wide Web) කියන්නේ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් අවකාශයේ අන්තර්ගතයන් (හුදෙක් අංක හා සංකේතවලට සීමා නොවී) රූපමය ආකාරයෙන් බැලිය හැකි, කතු කළ හැකි පහසුකමටයි. 1969 සිට සීමිත මිලිටරි හා පර්යේෂක භාවිතයන් සඳහා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ජාල ගොඩ නැගුණත් එය පුළුල්ව සමාජගත වීමට උදවු වුණු වෙබ් පහසුකම නිපදවනු ලැබුවේ 1989දී.

එතැන් පටන් ටිකෙන් ටික ලෝක ව්‍යාප්ත වූ වෙබ් අවකාශයට මුදල් ගෙවා ලබාගන්නා ගිණුමක් හරහා සම්බන්ධ වීමේ හැකියාවේ ශී‍්‍ර ලංකාවේ උදා වූයේ 1995දී. ඒ අනුව ඉන්ටර්නෙට් මෙරටට පැමිණ දැන් වසර 21ක් පිරීමට ආසන්නයිග

මුල් වසර කිහිපයේ වෙබ් සබඳතාවල වේගය ඉතා අඩු වූ නිසා අකුරුවලින් ඔබ්බට ගිය රූප, ශබ්ද හා වීඩියෝ ආදියට ප‍්‍රවේශ වීමට හැකි වූයේ නැහැ. මේ තත්ත්වය ටිකෙන් ටික හොඳ අතට පෙරැලූනේ 2004 පමණ පටන් පුළුල්පථ (Broadband) ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සේවා ව්‍යාප්ත වීමත් සමගයි.

ඒ අනුව වඩාත් විචිත‍්‍ර වෙබ් අන්තර්ගතයන්ට පිවිසීමටත්, ඒවා බෙදා ගන්නටත් හැකි වූවා. ඒ සමගම අන්තර් කි‍්‍රයාකාරීත්වය වැඩි වීමටත්, භාවිත කිරීමේ ලෙහෙසිය ඉහළ යාටමත් පටන් ගත්තා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ලෙස පොදුවේ හඳුන්වන වෙබ් භාවිතයන් ප‍්‍රචලිත වීම ඇරඹුණේ පුළුල්පථ සේවා පැතිරීමත් සමගයි. ඒ අනුව Facebook 2004දීත්, YouTube 2005දීත් ක්ෂුද්‍ර පණිවුඩ හුවමාරුවක් ලෙස Twitter 2006දීත් අප අතරට ආවා.

Social-Media-for-Marketing

මුලදී ටික දෙනෙකු පමණක් සම්බන්ධ වූ මේ නොමිලයේ ලැබෙන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සේවාවන් වඩාත් ජනපි‍්‍රය වුයේ සිංහල හා දෙමළ භාෂා වලින් ද ඒවායේ අන්තර්ගතය කියැවීමට හා ලිවීමට හැකි වූ පසුයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය බිහි වී සීඝ‍්‍රගාමීව පරිනාමය වන අතරේ එයට සමාන්තරව වෙනත් වෙබ් ප‍්‍රවණතා ද ඉදිරියට ගියා.

ශී‍්‍ර ලංකාවේ ප‍්‍රධාන ධාරාවේ පුවත්පත් සිය වෙබ් අඩවි බිහි කිරීම පටන් ගත්තේ 1995 සැප්තැම්බරයේ (ඬේලි නිවුස් හා සන්ඬේ ඔබ්සවර් පත‍්‍රවලින්). මේ වන විට වෙබ් හරහා පමණක් පුවත් ආවරණය කරන, පුවත් වෙබ් අඩවි ගණනාවක් බිහිව තිබෙනවා. LBO, Asian Mirror, Lanka eNews ඇතුලූ මෙබඳු පුවත් වෙබ් අඩවි රැසක් තිබෙනවා.

මේවා වැටුප් ලබන මාධ්‍යවේදීන් අතින් සම්පාදනය කැරෙන, ව්‍යාපාරික මට්මින් පළ කැරෙන මාධ්‍ය ගොන්නටම වැටෙනවා. එකම වෙනස ඔවුන් පළ කිරීමට යොදා ගන්නා මාධ්‍යය පමණයි.

මෙම පුවත් වෙබ් අඩවි හෝ එම ආකෘතියම අනුකරණය කරමින් බිහිව ඇති ගොසිප් ( ඕපාදූප) වෙබ් අඩවි හෝ කිසිසේත්ම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගණයට වැටෙන්නේ නැහැ. මේ සංකල්පීය නිරවුල් බව ඉතා වැදගත්.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය භාවිත කරන මිලියන් ගණනක් ලක් ජනයා අතරින් ටික දෙනකු කරන මෝඩ වැඩ හෝ අසැබි වැඩ නිසා සමස්ත සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලටම (වැඩිපුරම ෆේස් බුක් එකට) දොස් පවරන්නේ ඇයි?

පත්තරයක්, ටෙලිවිෂන් හෝ රේඩියෝ සේවාවක් නීති විරෝධී හෝ සදාචාර විරෝධී යමක් කළොත් එහි වගකීම දරන්නට හා දොස් අසන්නට නිශ්චිත හිමිකරුවන්, කළමනාකරුවන් හා කතුවරුන් සිටිනවා. එහෙත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යනු එවන් ජන මාධ්‍යයක් නොව සන්නිවේදන වේදිකාවක් පමණයි.

Texts, Internet and Social Media - gifts from God, says Pope, 22 Jan 2016

Texts, Internet and Social Media – gifts from God, says Pope, 22 Jan 2016

සයිබර් සංකල්ප විස්තර කිරීමට මා ඇතැම් විට භෞතික ලෝකයේ උපමිතීන් යොදා ගන්නවා.

ගාලූ මුවදොර පිටියට ගොස් ජනකායක් මැද කිසිවකු මුහුදට පැන දිවි නසා ගත හොත් පිටියට පරිපාලන වශයෙන් වග කියන ආයතනය එම කි‍්‍රයාවට දොස් අසන්නේ නැහැ.

කි‍්‍රකට් තරගයක් නරඹන තිස් දහසක් පේ‍්‍රක්ෂකයන් අතරින් එක් අමනයෙක් පිටියට දුම් බෝම්බයක් වීසි කළොත් පිටියේ පරිපාලකයින් එයට වගකිව යුතු යයි කිසිවකු නොකියනු ඇති.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ද මෙසේ විසල් හා විවිධ ජනකායක් ගැවසෙන ස්ථානයි. එම සයිබර් වේදිකා පරිපාලනය කරන ෆේස්බුක් වැනි සමාගම්වලට හැක්කේ තාක්ෂණකිව මනා ලෙස කි‍්‍රයා කරන, සයිබර් ප‍්‍රහාර වලට ඔරොත්තු දීමේ හැකියාව ඇති අවකාශයක් පවත්වා ගැනීමයි. එයින් ඔබ්බට එම වේදිකාවට ගොඩ වන සෑම අයකුම කියන හෝ බෙදා ගන්නා හෝ වචන, රූප හා වීඩියෝ බිලියන් ගණනක් නිරතුරු නිරීක්ෂණය කිරීමට ඔවුන්ට නොහැකියි.

සමාජ මාධ් භාවිත කරන අපටත් යම් වගකීම් තිබෙනවා. බහුතරයක් දෙනා සිය වගකීම් ඉටු කළත් ඉඳහිට එසේ නොකරන අයකුගේ අමන කිරයාවකින් සමස්ත වේදිකාව අවමානට ලක් වනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය නියාමනය කරන්නැයි ඇතැම් දෙනා රජයට ඉල්ලීම් හා බලපෑම් කරනවා. ඒවා යහපත් අරමුණින් කරනවා විය හැකි නමුත් මේ සංසිද්ධිය ගැන නිරවුල් අවබෝධයකින් තොරව හා ආවේගශීලීව කරන බව පෙනෙනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කි‍්‍රයාත්මක වන්නේ ගෝලීය මට්ටමින්. ඒවා හිමි සමාගම් යම් රටක නීති රාමුව තුළ ලියාපදිංචිව සිටිනවා. උදාහරණයකට ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් වේදිකා අයත් සමාගම් අමෙරිකාවේ ලියාපදිංචි සමාගම්. එරට සමාගම් දැඩි නීති හා නියාමන රාමුවකට නතු වනවා. වංචනික ව්‍යාපාරික කි‍්‍රයා හෝ අයථා ඒකාධිකාරයන් ගොඩනංවා ගැනීම ආදිය ගැන එරට නීති තන්ත‍්‍රය තදින් සිටිනවා. යුරෝපීය රටවල ලියාපදිංචි සන්නිවේදන සමාගම් සඳහා ද මෙයට සමාන නීති හා නියාමන පද්ධතියක් බල පවත්වනවා.

එසේම මේ ඕනෑම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවක අප ගිණුමත් අරඹන විට ඔවුන්ගේ කොන්දේසි ගණනාවකට අප අනුගත වන බවට එකඟවීමට සිදු වනවා. බොහෝ දෙනකු මේ කොන්දේසි නොකියවා ම එයට එකඟ වී ගිණුම් අරඹනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා තමන් හුවමාරු කර ගන්නා අන්තර්ගතය නීතිමය හා සදාචාරාත්මක රාමුවක් තුළ තිබිය යුතුය යන්න මේ කොන්දේසි හරහා පුළුල්ව කියැවෙනවා.

එතැනින් ඔබ්බට පළ කරන හෝ හුවමාරු හෝ අදහස්, රූප, ශබ්ද ඛණ්ඩ හා වීඩියෝ ආදිය එකින් එක විමර්ශනයට ලක් කැරෙන්නේ නැහැ. එසේ කිරීමට බැරි තරම් අති විශාල අන්තර්ගතයක් හැම පැයකම මේ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා සංසරණය වනවා.

එසේම ලොව විවිධ භාෂා වලින් නිර්මිත මේ අන්තර්ගතයන් කියවා තේරුම් ගැනීම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පරිපාලනය භාරව සිටින තාක්ෂණෙවීදීන්ට ලෙහෙසියෙන් හැකි දෙයක් ද නොවෙයි.

භාෂණයේ හා කථනයේ නිදහස ඉහළින් අගය කරන පරිනත සමාජයන්ගේ එම නිදහස වගකීමකින් යුතුව භාවිත කරනු ඇතැයි විශ්වාසයක් ද තිබෙනවා. ඉඳහිට මේ විශ්වාසය කඩ වූවත්, බහුතරයක් අවස්ථාවල එසේ වන්නේ නැහැ.

මේ නිසා මහජනයා නිරායාසයෙන් සැක කිරීම, ආවේක්ෂණයට ලක් කිරීම ආදිය පරිණත රජාතන්තරවාදයක් ඇති රටවල කරන්නේ හේතු සාධක ඇති අවස්ථාවලදී, නිසි අධිකරණ අධීක්සණයක් යටතේ පමණයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල යනු සයිබර් අවකාශයේ සැරිසරන ජනයා මුණ ගැසී ඩිජිටල් වශයෙන් සාමීචි හා හුවමාරු කර ගන්නා වේදිකායි. මේ වේදිකාවලට පිවිසෙන අප සැමටත් අපේ ආරක්ෂාව ගැන යම් වගකීමක් තිබෙනවා.

ඒ වගකීම මුළුමනින් ම රජයට හෝ වේදිකා පරිපාලකයන්ට හෝ පවරා ඔහේ ඉබාගාතේ සැරිසරන්නට අපට ඉඩක් නැහැ. එසේ කිරීම හරියට දිවා රාතී‍්‍ර නොතකා මුදල් රැසක් අතැතිව, ආභරණ පැළඳගෙන ප‍්‍රසිද්ධ උද්‍යානයක ඇවිද යාමක් වගෙයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය මා සම කරන්නේ ජනයාගෙන් පිරී ඉතිරුණු පොළකටයි. පොළේ අනේකවිධ දේ අලෙවි කැරෙනවා. කලබලය, ඝෝෂාකාරී බව අධික වෙතත්, අලූත් එළවළු, පළතුරු හා වෙනත් එදිනෙදා අවශ්‍ය ද්‍රව්‍ය හොඳ මිලකට ගන්නට බොහෝ දෙනකු පොළට එනවා.

පොළට පිවිසෙන පාරිභෝගිකයකු මෙන් ම වෙළෙන්දකු ද තම පසුම්බිය හා අනෙකුත් දේ ප‍්‍රවේශම් කරගත යුතුයි. එසේම මිලට ගන්නා විට හොඳ හැටි සොයා බලා එය කළ යුතුයි. සාධාරණ වෙළඳුන් අතර හොරට කිරණ, බාල බඩු විකුණන වෙළඳුන් ද සිටිය හැකියි. එසේම පාරිභෝගිකයන් සේ සැරිසරන සමහරුන් ගැට කපන්නන් වීමට ද හැකියි.

පොළ පවත්වන භූමිය පලාත් පාලන ආයතනයකින් වෙන් කරනු ලැබූවක් විය හැකි අතර, එයට අවශ්‍ය යම් මූලික ආරක්ෂාවක් පොලිසියෙන් සමහර විට සැපයෙනු ඇති. එහෙත් පොළට පිවිසෙන හැමගේ පෞද්ගලික ආරක්ෂාව තහවුරු කිරීමට රජයටවත්, පොලිසියටවත් බැහැ. එයට තම තමන්ගේ පෞද්ගලික වගකීමක් ද පවතිනවා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවල තත්ත්වයන් මීට වඩා බෙහෙවින් සමානයි. නොසැළකිල්ලෙන් සැරිසරන්නෝ යම් ඇබැද්දි වලට මුහුණ දිය හැකියි.

උදාහරණයකට තම ගිණුමේ මුරපදය (password) අන් අයට සොයා ගත හැකි ලෙස තැබුවහොත් ගිණුමට අනවසරයෙන් පිවිසී හානි කිරීමට ඉඩක් තිබෙනවා. අපේ රටේ බොහෝ ෆේස්බුක් ආරවුල් හට ගන්නේ මිතුරන් හෝ පෙම්වතුන් ලෙස මුරපද බෙදා ගෙන සිට, විරසක වූ පසු එය අවභාවිත කොට ගිණුමට කඩාකප්පල්කාරී කි‍්‍රයා කිරීම නිසයි.

රටේ සෑම දෙනා ම පොළට යන්නේ නැති බවත් අප දන්නවා. එහි ගාලගෝට්ටිය, රස්නය හා තදබදය නොකැමැත්තෝ වායුසමීකරණය කළ සුපර්මාකට්වලට යනවා. මිල සහ අලූත් බවේ වෙනසක් තිබිය හැකියි. එහෙත් වඩාත් විවේකීව හා සැප පහසුවෙන් තමන්ගේ බඩු තෝරා මිලට ගත හැකියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවල දෙනෝදාහක් දෙනා සමග ගැවසීමට නොකැමැති නම් වෙනත් වෙබ් අඩවි හරහා තම තොරතුරු අවශ්‍යතා සම්පාදනය කර ගත හැකියි. එහෙත් තම මිතුරු මිතුරියන් බොහෝ දෙනෙකු ගැවසෙන්නේ ෆෙස්බුක්හි නම් වෙන තැනකට යන්නෝ තරමක් හුදෙකලා වනවා.

ප්‍රධාන ප්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය ආයතනවල වෙබ් අඩවි හරියට සුපර්මාකට් වගේ. වෙබ් හරහා පමණක් පළ කරන පුවත් වෙබ් අඩවි හා ගොසිප් වෙබ් අඩවි, තනි කඩ සාප්පු වගේ. මේවායේ සහ පොළ අතර වෙනස අප දන්නවා. මේ උපමිතිය හරහාවත් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අන් වෙබ් කොටස් සමග පටලවා නොගන්න!

Supermarket, shop or streetside fair? The choice is yours!

Supermarket, shop or streetside fair? The choice is yours!

See also:

26 April 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #165: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ලක් සමාජයේම කැඩපතක්

29 June 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #174: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඇවිලෙන ගින්නට පිදුරු දැමීමක් ද?