Fake News in Indian General Election 2019: Interview with Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa, journalist, digital activist and founder of Medianama.com

Nikhil Pahwa is an Indian journalist, digital rights activist, and founder of MediaNama, a mobile and digital news portal. He has been a key commentator on stories and debates around Indian digital media companies, censorship and Internet and mobile regulation in India.

On the even of India’s general election 2019, Nalaka Gunawardene spoke to him in an email interview to find out how disinformation spread on social media and chat app platforms figures in election campaigning. Excerpts of this interview were quoted in Nalaka’s #OnlineOffline column in the Sunday Morning newspaper of Sri Lanka on 7 April 2019.

Nalaka: What social media and chat app platforms are most widely used for spreading mis and disinformation in the current election campaign in India?

Nikhil: In India, it’s as if we’ve been in campaigning mode ever since the 2014 elections got over: the political party in power, the BJP, which leveraged social media extensively in 2014 to get elected has continued to build its base on various platforms and has been campaigning either directly or, allegedly, through affiliates, ever since. They’re using online advertising, chat apps, videos, live streaming, and Twitter and Facebook to campaign. Much of the campaigning happens on WhatsApp in India, and messages move from person to person and group to group. Last elections we saw a fair about of humour: jokes were used as a campaigning tool, but there was a fair amount of misinformation then, as there has been ever since.

Are platforms sufficiently aware of these many misuses — and are they doing enough (besides issuing lofty statements) to tackle the problem?

Platforms are aware of the misuse: a WhatsApp video was used to incite a riot as far back as 2013. India has the highest number of internet shutdowns in the world: 134 last year, as per sflc.in. much of this is attributable to internet shutdowns, and the inability of local administration to deal with the spread of misinformation.

Platforms are trying to do what they can. WhatsApp has, so far, reduced the ability to forward messages to more than 5 people at a time. Earlier it was 256 people. Now people are able to control whether they can be added to a group without consent or not. Forwarded messages are marked as forwarded, so people know that the sender hasn’t created the message. Facebook has taken down groups for inauthentic behavior, robbing some parties of a reach of over 240,000 fans, for some pages. Google and Facebook are monitoring election advertising and reporting expenditure to the Election Commission. They are also supporting training of journalists in fact checking, and funding fact checking and research on fake news. These are all steps in the right direction, but given the scale of the usage of these platforms and how organised parties are, they can only mitigate some of the impact.

Does the Elections Commission have powers and capacity to effectively address this problem?

Incorrect speech isn’t illegal. The Election Commission has a series of measures announced, including a code of conduct from platforms, approvals for political advertising, take down of inauthentic content. I’m not sure of what else they can do, because they also have to prevent misinformation without censoring legitimate campaigning and legitimate political speech.

What more can and must be done to minimise the misleading of voters through online content?

I wish I knew! There’s no silver bullet here, and it will always be an arms race versus misinformation. There is great political incentive for political parties to create misinformation, and very little from platforms to control it.

WhatsApp 2019 commercial against Fake News in India

Debating Social Media Block in Sri Lanka: Talk show on TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Aluth Parlimenthuwa live talk show on Social Media Blocking in Sri Lanka – TV Derana, 14 March 2018

Sri Lanka’s first ever social media blocking lasted from 7 to 15 March 2018. During that time, Facebook and Instagram were completely blocked while chat apps WhatsApp and Viber were restricted (no images, audio or video, but text allowed).

On 7 March 2018, the country’s telecom regulator, Telecommunications Regulatory Commission (TRCSL), ordered all telecom operators to impose this blocking across the country for three days, Reuters reported. This was “to prevent the spread of communal violence”, the news agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying. In the end, the blocking lasted 8 days.

For a short while during this period, Internet access was stopped entirely to Kandy district “after discovering rioters were using online messaging services like WhatsApp to coordinate attacks on Muslim properties”.

Both actions are unprecedented. In the 23 years Sri Lanka has had commercial Internet services, it has never imposed complete network shutdowns (although during the last phase of the civil war between 2005 and 2009, the government periodically shut down telephone services in the Northern and Eastern Provinces). Nor has any social media or messaging platforms been blocked before.

I protested this course of action from the very outset. Restricting public communications networks is ill-advised at any time — and especially bad during an emergency when people are frantically seeking reliable situation updates and/or sharing information about the safety of loved ones.

Blocking selected websites or platforms is a self-defeating exercise in any case, since those who are more digitally savvy – many hate peddlers among them –can and will use proxy servers to get around. It is the average web user who will be deprived of news, views and updates.

While the blocking was on, I gave many media interviews to local and international media. I urged the government “to Police the streets, not the web!”.

At the same time, I acknowledged and explained how a few political and religious extremist groups have systematically ‘weaponised’ social media in Sri Lanka during recent years. These groups have been peddling racially charged hate speech online and offline. A law to deal with hate speech has been in the country’s law books for over a decade. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) Act No 56 of 2007 prohibits the advocacy of ‘religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence’. This law, fully compliant with international human rights standards, has not been enforced.

On 14 March 2018, I took part in the ‘Aluth Parlimenthuwa’ TV talk show of TV Derana on this topic, where I articulated the above and related views. The other panelists were Deputy Minister Karu Paranawithana, presidential advisor Shiral Lakthilaka, Bar Association of Sri Lanka chairman U R de Silva, and media commentator Mohan Samaranayake.

Part 1:

Part 2:

 

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවහිර කිරීම හා නව මාධ්‍ය භීතිකාව: 2018 මාර්තු 8 වනදා ලියූ සටහනක්

This comment on Sri Lanka’s social media blocking that commenced on 7 March 2018, was written on 8 March 2018 at the request of Irida Lakbima Sunday broadsheet newspaper, which carried excerpts from it in their issue of 11 March 2018. The full text is shared here, for the record.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවහිරය ඇරඹුනාට පසුවදා, 2018 මාර්තු 8 වනදා, ඉරිදා ලක්බිම පත්‍රයේ ඉල්ලීම පිට ලියන ලද කෙටි සටහනක්. මෙයින් උපුටා ගත් කොටස් 2018 මාර්තු 11 ඉරිදා ලක්බිමේ පළ වුණා.

Sunday Lakbima 11 March 2018

සමාජමාධ්‍ය අවහිර කිරීම හා නව මාධ්‍ය භීතිකාව:

– නාලක ගුණවර්ධන

‘‘අන්න සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ එකතු වෙලා රට ගිනි තියනවා!

නව සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණයන්ට දොස් තබන්නටම බලා සිටින උදවිය යළිත් වරක් මේ දිනවල මේ චෝදනාව මතු කරනවා. මොකක්ද මෙහි ඇත්ත නැත්ත?

2018 මාර්තු 7 වනදා රජය සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කිහිපයකට තාවකාලික සීමා පැනවූවා. හේතුව ලෙස දැක්වූයේ රටේ වාර්ගික ගැටුම් ඇති කරන පිරිස් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා තම ප්‍රහාරයන් සම්බන්ධීකරණය කරන බවට සාක්ෂි ලැබී ඇති බවයි.

මේ අනුව ෆේස්බුක්, ඉන්ස්ටග්‍රෑම් යන සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකා දෙකත්, WhatsApp හා Viber යන චැට් වේදිකා දෙකත් දින කීපයකට මෙරට සිට පිවිසීම අවහිර කොර තිබෙනවා. මේ නියෝගය දී ඇත්තේ ටෙලිකොම් නියාමන කොමිසමයි (TRCSL).

හදිසි අවස්ථාවක නීතිය හා සාමය රැකීමේ එක් පියවරක් ලෙස මේ තාවකාලික තහන්චිය සාධාරණීකරණය කළත්, මෙය සාර්ථක වේද යන්න සැක සහිතයි. අවහිර කරන වෙබ් අඩවි හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය වේදිකාවලට අනියම් ක්‍රමවලින් හෙවත් proxy server හරහා පිවිසීමේ දැනුම සමහරුන් සතුයි.

වෛරීය ක්‍රියා සඳහා සමාජමාධ්‍ය අවභාවිත කරන අය කොහොමටත් පරිගණක තාක්ෂණය දන්නා නිසා මෙවැනි තහන්චියකින් ඔවුන් නතර කළ හැකිද යන්න රජය මෙනෙහි කළ යුතුයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අවභාවිත කරන්නේ සාපේක්ෂව සුලු පිරිසක්. උදාහරණයකට අපේ රටේ මිලියන් හයකට වැඩි දෙනකුට ෆේස්බුක් ගිනුම් ඇති අතර එයින් වෛරීය පණිවුඩ පතුරුවන්නේ හා ප්‍රහාරවලට සන්නිවේදන කරන්නේ ටික දෙනකු පමණයි.

ඔවුන් පාලනය කරන්න පොලිසියට නොහැකි වීම නිසා සමස්ත මිලියන් හයටම ෆේස්බුක් ප්‍රවේශ වීම අවහිර කරන්න පියවර අරන්.

මේ නිසා ජාතීන් අතර සහජීවනය, සමගිය හා සාමය පිලිබඳ ෆේස්බුක් හරහා වටිනා පණිවුඩ දුන් කුමාර් සන්ගක්කාර වැනි අයගේ සන්නිවේදනත් මේ මොහොතේ සමාජගත් වන්නේ නැහැ. මුස්ලිම් ජනයා රැක ගන්න පෙරට ආ සිංහලයන් ගැන තොරතුරු ගලා යාමට ක්‍රමයක් ද නැහැ.

Popular meme – one among many – condemning Social Media Blocking in Sri Lanka in early March 2018

“සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ” කියා පිරිසක් ඇත්තටම නැහැ. ඒවා අපට වඩාත් හුරු ආකාරයේ විධිමත් ජනමාධ්‍ය නොවෙයි. ෆේස්බුක් වැනි වේදිකාවලට ගොඩ වන්නේ, ඒවායේ සේවා නොමිලයේ ලබන්නේ සාමාන්‍ය ජනයායි. බොහෝ කොටම පෞද්ගලික සාමීචි කතාවලට. විටින්විට දේශපාලන හා කාලීන වෙනත් කථාත් එහි මතු වනවා.

ඒත් සැබැවින්ම රට ගිනි තබන ජාතිවාදී, අවස්ථාවාදී මැරයෝ නම් ෆේස්බුක් තිබුණත් නැතත් තම ප්‍රචන්ඩත්වයට කෙසේ හෝ මාර්ග පාදා ගනීවි. නිසි ලෙස නීතිය සැමට එක ලෙස ක්‍රියාත්මක වනවා නම් මේ දාමරිකයන් අත් අඩන්ගුවට ගෙන උසාවි ගත කළ යුතුයි.

මා මාධ්‍ය වාරණයට විරුද්ධයි. ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වාරණයටත් විරුද්ධයි. බහුතරයක් අහිංසක, හිතකර සන්නිවේදන සිදුවන වේදිකාවක්, මැරයන් ටික දෙනකුද එහි ගොඩ වී නීතිවිරෝධී වැඩට භාවිත කළ පමණින් එය ගෙඩිපිටින් අවහිර කිරීම පරිනත ක්‍රියාවක් නොවෙයි.

මේ තර්කයම මොහොතකට තැපැල් සේවාවට නැතහොත් ජන්ගම දුරකථනවලට ආදේශ කළොත්? 1988-89 වකවානුවේ ජවිපෙ විසින් තර්ජනාත්මක ලිපි කීපයක් තැපෑලෙන් යැවූ නිසා සමස්ත ලියුම් බෙදිල්ලම විටින්විට නතර කළ බව අපට මතකයි.

ඒ මෝඩ ක්‍රියාවෙන් කී ලක්ෂයක් ලියුම් ප්‍රමාද වී ගොඩ ගැසුනාද? ලියුම් බෙදිල්ල නතර කළා කියා එවකට යටිබිම්ගත ප්‍රචන්ඩ දේශපාලනයක නිරතව සිටි ජවිපෙ සන්නිවේදන නතර වුණේ නැති බව නම් අපට මතකයි.

නූතන සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථයට අනුගත වන නව පන්නයේ නියාමන ක්‍රම හා ප්‍රතිපත්තිමය ප්‍රතිචාර අපට අවශ්‍යයි. එහි විවාදයක් නැහැ එහෙත් 20 වන සියවසේ වාරණ මානසිකත්වයෙන් 21 සියවසේ වෙබ් මාධ්‍යවලට ප්‍රතිචාර දක්වන්නට බැහැ.

බ්ලොක් කළ වෙබ් සේවාවලට අනුයක් ක්‍රම මගින් මැරයෝ පිවිසෙද්දී අහිංසක ජනයා එහි යා නොහැකිව ලත වීම පමණයි සිදුවන්නේ!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තවමත් සාපේක්ෂව අළුත් නිසා ඒවායේ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිත්වය හා සමාජීය බලපෑම ගැන අප සැවොම තවමත් අත්දැකීම් ලබමින් සිටිනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන ඉක්මන් නිගමනවලට එළඹෙන බොහෝ දෙනකු ඒ ගැන ගවේෂණාත්මක අධ්‍යයනයකින් නොව මතු පිටින් පැතිකඩ කිහිපයක් කඩිමුඩියේ දැකීමෙන් එසේ කරන අයයි.

තවත් සමහරුන් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය කවදාවත් තමන් භාවිත කළ අයත් නොවෙයි! එහෙන් මෙහෙන් අහුලාගත් දෙයින් විරෝධතා නගනවා!

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යනු බහුවිධ හා සංකීර්ණ සංසිද්ධියක්. එය හරි කලබලකාරී වේදිකාවක් නැතහොත් විවෘත පොළක් වගෙයි. අලෙවි කිරීමක් නැති වුවත් ඝෝෂාකාරී හා කලබලකාරී පොලක ඇති ගතිසොබාවලට සමාන්තර බවක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වනවා. එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයත් අතිශයින් විවිධාකාරයි.  එහි සංසරණය වන හා බෙදා ගන්නා සියල්ල ග‍්‍රහණය කරන්නට කිසිවකුටත් නොහැකියි.

Muslim intellectual demonises Social Media as ‘even more dangerous than physical violence against muslims’: Lakbima, 11 March 2018

Sri Lanka Parliamentary Election 2015: How did Social Media make a difference?

A Popular Election Meme created by Hashtag Generation, Sri Lanka

A Popular Election Meme created by Hashtag Generation, Sri Lanka

“Every citizen – including activists and academics — can play a part in shaping the future of our democracy. In this, technology is not the only key driver; what matters even more is the strategic use of our imagination and determination.

“We may not yet have all the detailed answers of our digital future, but one thing is clear. In 2015, we the people of Sri Lanka embarked on a progressive digitalization of our politics and governance.

“It is going to be a bumpy road – be forewarned — but there is no turning back.”

These are the closing paras of a long format essay I have just written on the role of social media in the recently concluded Sri Lanka Parliamentary (General) Election on 17 August 2015.  It has been published by Groundviews.org citizen journalism website.

I Will Vote meme created by Groundviews.org - trilingual version

I Will Vote meme created by Groundviews.org – trilingual version

Shortly after the Presidential Election of 8 January 2015 ended, I called it Sri Lanka’s first cyber election. That was based on my insights from over 20 years of watching and chronicling the gradual spread of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Sri Lanka and the resulting rise of an information society.

Since then, things have evolved further. In this essay, I look at how the Elections Commission, political parties, election candidates, civil society advocacy groups and individual cyber activists have used various social media tools and platforms in the run-up to, during and immediately after the Parliamentary Election.

Read full text at:

Groundviews.org 3 September 2015: Sri Lanka Parliamentary Election 2015: How did Social Media make a difference

A compact version appeared in Daily Mirror, 3 September 2015: Social Media and LK General Election 2015: Has E-democracy arrived in Sri Lanka?

Not voting - then you have no right to complain afterwards! Voter message from March 12 Movement for Clean Politicians, Sri Lanka

Not voting – then you have no right to complain afterwards! Voter message from March 12 Movement for Clean Politicians, Sri Lanka

Social Media and LK General Election 2015: Has E-democracy arrived in Sri Lanka?

From Sri Lanka Elections Department Facebook page

From Sri Lanka Elections Department Facebook page

“What role (if any) did social media play in the recently concluded General Election on 17 August 2015?

“Many are asking this question – and coming up with different answers. That is characteristic of the cyber realm: there is no single right answer when it comes to a multi-faceted and fast-evolving phenomenon like social media.

“Shortly after the Presidential Election of 8 January 2015 ended, I called it Sri Lanka’s first cyber election. That was based on my insights from over 20 years of watching and chronicling the gradual spread of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Sri Lanka and the resulting rise of an information society.

“That was not the first time social media had figured in Lankan election campaigns. The trend started slowly some years ago, with a few tech-aware politicians and advertising agencies using websites, Facebook pages and twitter accounts for political outreach. However, such uses did not reach a ‘critical mass’ in the general and presidential elections held in 2010, or in the provincial and local government elections held thereafter.

“By late 2014, that changed significantly but this time the frontrunners were politically charged and digitally empowered citizens, not politicians or their support teams.”

The above is an extract from an op-ed I have just written and published in Daily Mirror broadsheet national newspaper in Sri Lanka (3 Sep 2015).

Full text is found online here:

Special thanks to Sanjana Hattotuwa and Yudhanjaya Wijeratne from whose analyses I have drawn. The unattributed opinions are all mine.

Infographic by Daily Mirror Sri Lanka

Infographic by Daily Mirror Sri Lanka