Drone assisted journalism in Sri Lanka: ‘Eyes in the Sky’ need ethical and careful ‘pilots’

Brief comment provided to Daily Mirror newspaper, Sri Lanka, on 20 January 2017:

‘Eyes in the Sky’ need ethical and careful ‘pilots’

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Bird's eye view provides a new, useful perspective in journalistic story telling. Image courtesy InterNews Sri Lanka

Bird’s eye view provides a new, useful perspective in journalistic story telling. Image courtesy InterNews Sri Lanka

For some, drones conjure images of death and destruction – military applications have been their most widely reported application. But unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs are increasingly being used for many peaceful purposes. That poses a host of ethical and legal challenges we must confront to get the best of this new technology while minimizing potential harms.

In the past few years, the cost of drones came down (an entry level unit sells for around LKR 35,000 in Colombo) as their versatility increased. This spurred many uses from newsgathering and post-disaster assessments to goods delivery and smart farming.

In Sri Lanka, surveyors, photographers, TV journalists and political parties were among the early civilian users of drones. They all grasped the value of the ‘bigger picture’ perspective such aerial photos or videos can provide. Until recently, accessing that vantage point was possible only through helicopters or fixed wing aircraft – a facility few could afford.

Having the bird’s eye view helps journalists and their audiences to make sense of complex situations like climate change impacts, conflicts over resources or political agitations. We certainly need more field-based and investigative reporting that goes beyond press releases and press conferences. Drones are fast joining the journalists’ toolkit — but what matters is their imaginative and responsible use.

Participants and trainers at Sri Lanka's first workshop on drone assisted journalism, Aug 2016 in Mt Lavinia

Participants and trainers at Sri Lanka’s first workshop on drone assisted journalism, Aug 2016 in Mt Lavinia

Here, we have both good news and bad news. On the positive side, over two dozen journalists and photojournalists have been trained in drone-assisted journalism during 2016 by drone journalism enthusiast (and drone pilot) Sanjana Hattotuwa and journalist Amantha Perera. Some trainees have since done good stories with drone-gathered images. Examples include probing the drought’s impacts in the dry zone, rising garbage crisis in Kattankudy on the east coast, and taking a close look at land use patterns in Hambantota.

Internews Sri Lanka: Drone gathered footage supporting journalism


The downside is that some news organisations are deploying drones without due regard for public safety or existing codes of media ethics. A drone hovered over the Colombo general cemetery as slain editor Lasantha Wickremetunge’s body was exhumed in September 2016. That disregarded a family request for privacy.

The end never justifies the means in good journalism. If some media groups continue to operate drones in such reckless manner, they risk discrediting the new technology and attracting excessive regulations.

Drones or any other new technologies need to be anchored in the basic ethics of journalism. Each new tool would also bring along its own layer of ethics. Where drone use is concerned, respecting privacy and considering the safety of others is far more important than, say, when using a handheld camera.

In February 2016, the Civil Aviation Authority of Sri Lanka (CAASL) published regulations for drone operation which apply to all users including journalists. This has been updated in January 2017. The Information Department, in a recent release, says it is working with CAASL to simplify these rules and streamline approval processes. That is a welcome move.

For now, Lankan journalists can follow the Code of Ethics for Drone Journalists already formulated by practitioners and researchers in the United States. It is available at: http://www.dronejournalism.org/code-of-ethics/

Nalaka Gunawardene is a columnist and independent media researcher. He tweets from @NalakaG

Image courtesy Daily Mirror

Image courtesy Daily Mirror

BBC Sinhala interview after US Presidential Election 2016: සමීක්ෂණ හා සෑබෑ ජනමතය අතර ගැටුමක්

Within hours of the US Presidential Election’s results becoming known on 9 November 2016, I gave a telephone interview to BBC Sinhala service. They asked me how almost all the opinion polls did not see Donald Trump winning the election, even though many polls said it was going to be a close contest.

සමීක්ෂණ හා සෑබෑ ජනමතය අතර ගැටුමක්

නොනවතින තොරතුරු ප්‍රවාහයක පිහිනීමට බටහිර රටවල් ඇතුළු ලොව බොහෝ රටවල ජනතාවට අවස්ථාව ලැබී තිබුණ ද, ඒ බොහෝ තොරතුරු ‘දූෂිත’ හෝ ‘විකෘති කරන ලද’ තොරතුරු වීම වර්තමාන සමාජය මුහුණදෙන අභියෝගයක් බව සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල විශ්ලේෂක නාලක ගුණවර්ධන පවසයි.

දැනට වොෂින්ටනයේ සංචාරයක නිරතව සිටින නාලක ගුණවර්ධන ඒ අදහස් පළ කළේ අඟහරුවාදා (නොවැ. 08) පැවති ජනපතිවරණයේදී බොහෝ ජනමත සමීක්ෂණවල අනාවැකි බැහැර කරමින් ඩොනල්ඩ් ට්‍රම්ප් ජයග්‍රහණය ලැබීම පිළිබඳව බීබීසී සංදේශය සමග අදහස් දක්වමිනි.

වෙනත් ආයතනවල ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ ඇසුරින් බීබීසී සකස් කළ ජනමත සමීක්ෂණය අනුව ද අඟහරුවාදා මධ්‍යම රාත්‍රිය වනවිටත් හිලරි ක්ලින්ටන් ඒකක හතරකින් ඉදිරියෙන් සිටියාය.

“ඇත්තටම මේක අද ඇමෙරිකාව පුරා මාධ්‍ය ආයතන සහ ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ ආයතනවල ප්‍රධානම ප්‍රශ්නය බවට පත්වෙලා තියනවා,” නාලක ගුණවර්ධන පැවසීය.

“අදහගන්න බැහැ සියලුම ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ සැබෑ ජනමතයෙන් මෙතරම් දුරස් වුනේ කොහොමද කියල.” යැයි පැවසූ ඔහු ඒ සම්බන්ධයෙන් මේ අවස්ථාවේ කළ හැක්කේ අනුමාන පළකිරීම පමණක් බව කීය.

‘ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ සැබෑ ජනමතයෙන් මෙතරම් දුරස් වුනේ කොහොමද?’

ජනමත සමීක්ෂණ පිළිබඳව ඇමෙරිකානු ජනතාව කිසියම් කලකිරීමක් දැක්වීම හේතුවෙන් ඔවුන් සිය අවංක මතය හෙළි නොකළේය යන්න එවැනි එක් අනුමානයක් බව ද ඔහු සඳහන් කළේය.

පසුගියදා බ්‍රිතාන්‍යය යුරෝපා සංගමයෙන් ඉවත්වීම සම්බන්ධ ‘Brexit’ ජනමත විචාරණයේදීත් මේ හා සමානම තත්වයක් මතුවීම ජනමත විචාරණ ක්‍රමවේදයේ වරදක් දැයි විමසූ විට ඔහු කියා සිටියේ ක්‍රමවේදයේත් අසම්පූර්ණතා පවතින බව කලක් මුලුල්ලේම දැනසිටි බවය.

එමෙන්ම ජනතාව තවදුරටත් සිය අවංක මතය පළකිරීමට උනන්දුවක් නැති නම් සමස්ත ජනමත විචාරණ කර්මාන්තයම කඩාවැටීමේ අනතුරක් පවතින බව ද නාලක ගුණවර්ධන සඳහන් කළේය.

ඒ සියල්ලටම වඩා ඇමෙරිකානු මැතිවරණයෙන් මතු වූ බරපතලම අභියෝගය වූයේ ජනමාධ්‍ය සහ සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාල ඔස්සේ ගලා ගිය තොරතුරු අතුරින් ‘සැබෑව සහ මිත්‍යාව වෙන් කරගැනීම’ බව ඔහු පෙන්වා දුණි.

එක් අතෙකින් ඉතිහාසයේ අන් කවරදාකටත් වඩා ජනතාවට තොරතුරු ලබාගැනීමේ අවකාශයක් මතු වී තිබෙන අතරම ඒ තොරතුරු අතරින් සත්‍යය සහ සම්පූර්ණ තොරතුරු සොයා ගැනීම අභියෝගයක් මෙන්ම ඉතා පරස්පර සංසිද්ධියක් බව ද නාලක ගුණවර්ධන වැඩිදුරටත් පැවසීය.

Media innovation in Sri Lanka: Responding then to tyranny, and now to opportunity

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

East-West Center 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016

The Hawaii-based East-West Center held its 2016 International Media Conference in New Delhi, India, from September 8 to 11, 2016. Themed “South Asia Looking East”, it drew over 350 participants from across Asia and the United States.

On September 11, I took part in a breakout session that discussed media innovation in Asia and the United States. While my fellow panelists spoke mainly about digital media innovation of their media outlet or media sector, I opted to survey the bigger picture: what does innovation really mean when media is under siege, and how can the media sector switch from such ‘innovation under duress’ to regular market or product innovation?

Here are my remarks, cleaned up and somewhat expanded:

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on media innovation under duress

Innovation has been going on in media from the beginning. Faced with major challenges from advancing technologies and changing demography, innovation is now an imperative for market survival.

We can discuss this at different levels: product innovation, process innovation and systemic innovation. I like to add another kind for our discussion: innovation for physical survival.

With forces social and market Darwinism constantly at work, you might ask, shouldn’t the most adaptable and nimble players survive – while others perish?

Yes and No. Sometimes the odds against independent and progressive media organisations are disproportionately high – they should not be left to fend for themselves. This is where media consumers and public spirited groups need to step in.

Let me explain with a couple of examples from South Asia.

They say necessity is the mother of invention or innovation. I would argue that tyranny – from the state and/or extremist groups – provides another strong impetus for innovation in the media.

In Nepal, all media came under strict control when King Gyanendra assumed total control in February 2005. Among other draconian measures, he suspended press freedom, imposing a blanket ban on private or community broadcasters carrying news, thus making it a monopoly of state broadcasters.

The army told broadcasters that the stations were free to carry music, but not news or current affairs. Soldiers were sent to radio and TV stations to ensure compliance.

When the king’s siege of democracy continued for weeks and months, some media started defying censorship – they joined human rights activists and civil society groups in a mass movement for political reforms, including the restoration of parliamentary democracy.

Some of Nepal’s many community radio stations found creative ways of defying censorship. One station started singing the news – after all, there was no state control over music and entertainment! Another one in central Nepal went outside their studio, set up an impromptu news desk on the roadside, and read the news to passers-by every evening at 6 pm.

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R - Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

Panel on Media innovation at East-West Center Media Conference, Delhi, 11 Sep 2016: L to R – Philippa McDonald, Nalaka Gunawardene, LEE Doo Won, Fernando (Jun) SEPE, Jr. and ZHONG Xin

The unwavering resolve of these and other media groups and pro-democracy activists led to the restoration of parliamentary democracy in April 2006 and the subsequent abolition of the Nepali monarchy.

My second example is from Sri Lanka where I live and work.

We are recovering from almost a decade of authoritarian rule that we ended in January 2015 by changing that government in an election. The years preceding that change were the darkest for freedom of expression and media freedom in Sri Lanka – the country, then nominally a democracy, was ranked 165th among 183 countries in the World Press Freedom Index for 2014.

In June 2012, Sri Lanka was one of 16 countries named by the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression for “attacks against journalists during coverage of street protests and demonstrations, such as arbitrary arrests and detention, verbal and physical attacks, confiscation or destruction of equipment, as well as killings.”

Threats of attacks and actual incidents of physical violence in recent years led to a climate of fear and widespread self-censorship among journalists in Sri Lanka. This is slowly changing now, but old habits die hard.

At the height of media repression by the former regime, we saw some of our media innovating simply for physical survival. One strategy was using satire and parody – which became important forms of political commentary, sometimes the only ones that were possible without evoking violent reprisals.

Three years ago, I wrote a column about this phenomenon which I titled ‘When making fun is no laughing matter (Ceylon Today, 5 May 2013).

What I wrote then, while still in the thick of crackdown, is worth recalling:

“For sure, serious journalism can’t be fully outsourced to satirists and stand-up comics. But comedy and political satire can play a key role in critiquing politicians, businessmen and others whose actions impact the public.

“There is another dimension to political satire and caricature that isn’t widely appreciated in liberal democracies where freedom of expression is constitutionally guaranteed.

“In immature democracies and autocracies, critical journalists and their editors take many risks in the line of work. When direct criticism becomes highly hazardous, satire and parody become important — and sometimes the only – ways for journalists get around draconian laws, stifling media regulations or trigger-happy goon squads…

“Little wonder, then, that some of Sri Lanka’s sharpest commentary is found in satire columns and cartoons. Much of what passes for political analysis is actually gossip.”

For years, cartoonists and political satirists fulfilled a deeply felt need in Sri Lanka for the media to check the various concentrations of power — in political, military, corporate and religious domains.

They still continue to perform an important role, but there is more space today for journalists and editors to report things as they are, and to comment on the key stories of the day.

During the past decade, we have also seen the rise of citizen journalism and vibrant blogospheres in the local languages of Sinhala and Tamil. Their advantage during the dark years was that they were too numerous and scattered for the repressive state to go after each one (We do know, however, that electronic surveillance was attempted with Chinese technical assistance.)

Of course, Sri Lanka’s media still face formidable challenges that threaten their market survival.

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

Rebuilding Public Trust: An Assessment of the Media Industry and Profession in Sri Lanka (May 2016)

A new assessment of Sri Lanka’s media, which I edited earlier this year, noted: “The economic sustainability of media houses and businesses remains a major challenge. The mainstream media as a whole is struggling to retain its consumer base. Several factors have contributed to this. Many media houses have been slow in integrating digital tools and web-based platforms. As a result, there is a growing gulf between media’s production models and their audiences’ consumption patterns.”

Innovation and imagination are essential for our media to break out of 20th century mindsets and evolve new ways of content generation and consumption. There are some promising new initiatives to watch, even as much of the mainstream continues business as usual – albeit with diminishing circulations and shrinking audience shares.

Innovate or perish still applies to our media. We are glad, however, that we no longer have to innovate just to stay safe from goon squads.

 

Social Media in Sri Lanka: Do Science and Reason Stand a Chance?

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on "Using Social Media for Discussing Science" at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Nalaka Gunawardene speaks on “Using Social Media for Discussing Science” at the Science, Technology & Society Forum in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 9 Sep 2016. Photo by Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka’s first Science and Technology for Society (STS) Forum took place from 7 to 10 September in Colombo. Organized by the Prime Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Research, it was one of the largest gatherings of its kind to be hosted by Sri Lanka.

Modelled on Japan’s well known annual STS forums, the event was attended by over 750 participants coming from 24 countries – among them local and foreign scientists, inventors, science managers, science communicators and students.

I was keynote speaker during the session on ‘Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics’. I used it to highlight how social media have become both a boon and bane for scientific information and thinking in Sri Lanka. This is due to peddlers of pseudo-science, anti-science and superstition being faster and better to adopt social media platforms than actual scientists, science educators and science communicators.

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Social Media in #LKA:Do Science & Reason stand a chance? Asks Nalaka Gunawardene

Sri Lanka takes justified pride in its high literacy levels and equally high coverage of vaccination against infectious diseases. But we cannot claim to have a high level of scientific literacy. If we did, it would not be so easy for far-fetched conspiracy theories to spread rapidly even among educated persons. Social media tools have ‘turbo-charged’ the spread of associated myths, superstitions and conspiracy theories!

I cautioned: “Unless we make scientific literacy an integral part of everyone’s lives, ambitious state policies and programmes to modernize the nation could well be jeopardized. Progress can be undermined — or even reversed — by extremist forces of tribalism, feudalism and ultra-nationalism that thrive in a society that lacks the ability to think critically.”

It is not a case of all doom and gloom. I cited examples of private individuals creatively using social media to bust myths and critique all ‘sacred cows’ in Lankan society – including religions and military. These voluntary efforts contrast with much of the mainstream media cynically making money from substantial advertising from black magic industries that hoodwink and swindle the public.

My PowerPoint presentation:

 

Video recording of our full session:

 

The scoping note I wrote for our session:

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016. L to R - Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti & Smriti Daniel

Sri Lanka STS Forum panel on Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics. 9 Sep 2016.
L to R – Asanga Abeygunasekera, Nalaka Gunawardene, Dr Piyal Ariyananda, Dr Ananda Galappatti &
Smriti Daniel

Session: Using Social Media for Discussing Science Topics

With 30 per cent of Sri Lanka’s 21 million people regularly using the Internet, web-based social media platforms have become an important part of the public sphere where myriad conversations are unfolding on all sorts of topics and issues. Facebook is the most popular social media outlet in Sri Lanka, with 3.5 million users, but other niche platforms like Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are also gaining ground. Meanwhile, the Sinhala and Tamil blogospheres continue to provide space for discussions ranging from prosaic to profound. Marketers, political parties and activist groups have discovered that being active in social media is to their advantage.

Some science and technology related topics also get discussed in this cacophony, but given the scattered nature of conversations, it is impossible to grasp the full, bigger picture. For example, some individuals or entities involved in water management, climate advocacy, mental health support groups and data-driven development (SDG framework) are active in Sri Lanka’s social media platforms. But who is listening, and what influence – if any – are these often fleeting conservations having on individual lifestyles or public policies?

Is there a danger that self-selecting thematic groups using social media are creating for themselves ‘echo chambers’ – a metaphorical description of a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an “enclosed” system, where different or competing views are dismissed, disallowed, or under-represented?

Even if this is sometimes the case, can scientists and science communicators afford to ignore social media altogether? For now, it appears that pseudo-science and anti-science sentiments – some of it rooted in ultra-nationalism or conspiracy theories — dominate many Lankan social media exchanges. The keynote speaker once described this as Lankan society permanently suspending disbelief. How and where can the counter-narratives be promoted on behalf of evidenced based, rational discussions? Is this a hopeless task in the face of irrationality engulfing wider Lankan society? Or can progressive and creative use of social media help turn the tide in favour of reason?

This panel would explore these questions with local examples drawn from various fields of science and skeptical enquiry.

 

 

සිවුමංසල කොලුගැටයා #283: ලක් සමාජය වංචනිකයන්ගෙන් බේරා ගැනීමට බුද්ධිමය ප්‍රතිශක්තිකරණයක් ඕනෑ!

STS Forum Sri Lanka

STS Forum Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s first Science and Technology for Society (STS) Forum took place from 7 to 10 September in Colombo. Organized by the Prime Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Research, it is one of the largest gatherings of its kind to be hosted by Sri Lanka.

What sets STS Forums apart is that they are not merely events where scientists talk to each other.  That surely will happen, but there will be many more voices and, hopefully, much broader conversations.

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala, appearing in the print issue of 11 Sep 2016), I look at Sri Lanka’s appalling lack of scientific literacy.

As Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson, American astrophysicist, cosmologist and science communicator, says, “Scientific literacy is an intellectual vaccine against the claims of charlatans who would exploit ignorance.”

Sri Lanka takes justified pride in its high literacy levels and equally high coverage of vaccination against infectious diseases. But we cannot claim to have a high level of scientific literacy.

A healthy dose of scepticism is essential to safeguard ourselves from superstitions, political claims and increasingly sophisticated – but often dishonest – product advertising. That’s what scientific literacy builds inside our minds.

I argue that unless we make scientific literacy an integral part of everyone’s lives, ambitious state policies and programmes to modernize the nation could well be jeopardized. Progress can be undermined — or even reversed — by extremist forces of tribalism, feudalism and ultra-nationalism that thrive in a society that lacks the ability to think critically.

See also my English op-ed: Scientific Literacy: ‘Mind Vaccine’ Sri Lanka Urgently Needs

Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson: One man worth cloning if that were feasible...

Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson: One man worth cloning if that were feasible…

විද්‍යාව, තාක්ෂණය හා සමාජය ගැන ජාත්‍යන්තර සමුළුවක් සැප්තැම්බර් 7 – 10 වකවානුව තුළ කොළඹදී පැවැත්වෙනවා.

”විද්‍යාව හා තාක්ෂණය තිරසාර සංවර්ධනයට නිසි ලෙස යොදා ගැනීම” මෙහි ප්‍රධාන තේමාවයි. ඒ යටතේ අනුතේමා හා මාතෘකා රැසක් වටා සැසිවාර පැවැත්වෙනවා.

අග්‍රාමාත්‍ය කාර්යාලය හා විද්‍යා – තාක්ෂණ අමාත්‍යාංශය සංවිධානය කරන මේ සමුළුව හුදෙක් විද්‍යාඥයන් හා තාක්ෂණවේදීන් එක් රැස් කරන තවත් අවස්ථාවක් පමණක් නොවෙයි.

මේ අයට අමතරව ප්‍රතිපත්ති සම්පාදකයන්, නව නිපැයුම්කරුවන්, විද්‍යා සන්නිවේදකයන්, විද්‍යා ගුරුවරුන්  හා ශිෂ්‍යයන් ද මෙයට සම්බන්ධ වනවා. ඇතැම් සැසිවාරවල අදහස් දක්වන්නේද මේ වඩාත් පුළුල් පිරිසෙන් තෝරා ගත් කථීකයන්.

මහජනයා සඳහා විද්‍යාව (citizen science) යන තේමාව යටතේ සැසිවාර කිහිපයක් සැළසුම් කිරීමට සංවිධායකවරුන් මට ඇරැයුම් කළා.

සාමාන්‍යයෙන් විද්‍යාත්මක සමුළුවලදී විද්‍යාව හා සෙසු සමාජය අතර සබඳතා ගැන එතරම් අවධානයක් යොමු කරන්නේ නැහැ. විද්වතුන් අතර කෙරෙන කථාබහ මාධ්‍ය වාර්තාකරණයට හසු වන්නේ ද සීමිතවයි.

එසේ බලන විට මේ සමුළුව අන් බොහෝ ඒවාට වඩා ඉදිරියෙන් සිටිනවා.

සාකච්ඡා කැරෙන අභ්‍යාවකාශ තාක්ෂණය, පරිගණ තාක්ෂණය, නැනෝ තාක්ෂණය, ජාතික නවොත්පාදන ප්‍රතිපත්තිරාමුව ආදී තේමා සියල්ල රටේ ආර්ථීක හා සමාජ සංවර්ධනයට දායක කරගත හැකි ක්ෂේත්‍රයන්.

එහෙත් විද්‍යාත්මක චින්තනය හා විවෘත මනසක් රටේ ස්ථාපිත නොවන තාක් කල් මේ කුමන තාක්ෂණයක් ප්‍රවර්ධනය කළත් එතරම් වැඩක් නැහැ. මන්ද තර්කානුකූලව සිතීමට හා ක්‍රියාකිරීමට නොහැකි සමාජයක් ලෙහෙසියෙන් වංචනිකයන් හා දේශපාලන අවස්ථාවාදීන්ට රවටා ගත හැකි නිසා.

වත්මන් සංකීර්ණ සමාජයේ ප්‍රවේශමින් දිවි ගෙවීමට බාල මහලු කොයි කාටත් යම් අවම විද්‍යාත්මක දැනුමක් හා චින්තනයක් අවශ්‍යයි.

එය පාසලේ හෝ සරසවියේ විෂ්‍ය නිර්දේශ අනුව උගන්වන විද්‍යාවන් නොවෙයි. එසේ විධිමත් ලෙස විද්‍යා විෂයයන් ඉගෙනීමට අවස්ථාවක් ලැබෙන්නේ අපේ ජනගහනයෙන් සාපේක්ෂව සීමිත පිරිසකට පමණයි.

එහෙත් මිලියන 21ක සියලු ලාංකිකයන්ට මූලික මට්ටමේ විද්‍යාත්මක අවබෝධයක් ලබා දීම වැදගත්.

මෙහිදී අවශ්‍ය වන්නේ විශේෂඥ දැනුම නොව විද්‍යාත්මකව සිතීම හා  එය එදිනෙදා ජීවිතයට අදාළ කර ගැනීමයි. ”විද්‍යාත්මක සාක්ෂරතාවය” (scientific literacy) ලෙස හඳුන්වන්නේ එයයි.

එහි නිර්වචනය නම් විද්‍යාත්මක සංකල්ප හා ක්‍රියාදාමයන් ගැන මූලික දැනුමක් හා අවබෝධයක් ලැබීම හා එය පෞද්ගලික ජීවිතයේ තීරණ ගැනීමට මෙන්ම වෘත්තීය හා සංස්කෘතික ක්‍රියාකාරකම්වලට පාදක කර ගැනීමයි.

අද ලොව සිටින දක්ෂතම හා වඩාත් ප්‍රකට විද්‍යා සන්නිවේදකයකු වන අමෙරිකානු තාරකා භෞතික විද්‍යාඥ ආචාර්ය නීල්ඩිග්‍රාස් ටයිසන් (Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson) එය වඩාත් සිත් කාවදින ලෙසින් මෙසේ කියනවා.

”විද්‍යාත්මක සාක්ෂරතාවය හරියට මනසට ලබා දෙන බුද්ධිමය එන්නතකට සමානයි. අපේ නොදැනුවත්කම හරහා අප රවටන්නට බලා සිටින සටකපට තක්කඩියන්ගෙන් බේරීමට හොඳම උපක්‍රමයයි.”

ආසියාවේම ඉහළ සාක්ෂරතාවයක් ගැහැණු, පිරිමි දෙපිරිසටම ලබා ගැනීම ගැන සමාජයක් ලෙස අප ආඩම්බර වනවා. එසේම බෝවන රෝග වළක්වා ගැනීමට එන්නත් හරහා ප්‍රතිශක්තිකරණය ලබා දීම අතින්ද රටේ මුළු ජනගහනයම පාහේ ආවරණය කිරීමට අපේ සෞඛ්‍ය සේවාව සමත්ව සිටිනවා.

untitled-614

එහෙත් අපේ විද්‍යාත්මක සාක්ෂරතාව ගැන නම් කිසිසේත්ම සෑහීමකට පත් වන්නට බැහැ. උගත්කම, වත්කම, සමාජ තරාතිරම හා වෘත්තිමය පසුබිම කුමක් වෙතත් තර්කානුකූලව සිතීමට හැකියාව ඇත්තේ අප අතර ටික දෙනකුට පමණයි.

මෙහි රෝග ලක්ෂණ හෙවත් විපාක  ඕනෑ තරම් අප සමාජයේ දැකිය හැකියි.

22 Jan 2012: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #50: අවිචාරයේ සැඩ සුළගට මැදි වුණු හේතුවාදී පහන් සිළුව

29 Jan 2012: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #51: ඔබේ විචාර බුද්ධිය දැන් අක‍්‍රීය කරන්න!

එක් පසෙකින් ජ්‍යොතිෂවේදීන්, දේවාල කපුවන්, විශ්ව ශක්තිකාරයන්, බලිතොවිල් කාරයන් හා වෙනත් ගුප්ත ශාස්ත්‍ර අලෙවි කරන්නන් පසුපස යමින් පෞද්ගලික ජීවිතයේ අවශ්‍යතා සඳහා ඉක්මනින්, කෙටික්‍රම (ෂෝට් කට්) සොයන්නෝ එමටයි. ඒ අතර ඕනෑතරම් පොතේ උගතුන්ද සිටිනවා.

විශ්වාස හා ඇදහිලි මත පදනම් වු වංචනික ක්‍රියා කෙතරම් අප සමාජයේ එළිපිට සිදු කැරෙනවා ද? විභාග ජය, රැකියා ජය, විවාහයන් හා ව්‍යාපාර සාර්ථකත්වය වැනි විවිධාකාර ජීවන අභියෝගවලට උපකාර ලබා දෙන බවට පොරොන්දු වන දැන්වීම් ඉරිදා පුවත්පත්වලත්, ඇතැම් ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකා තීරයේ පහළිනුත් ප්‍රසිද්ධියේ පළ කරනවා.

ඊටත් එහා යන ප්‍රබල ගුරුකම්ල අණවින හා කොඩිවින ද තිබෙනවා. මේවායේ සේවය ලබා ගන්නට විශාල වශයෙන් මුදල් ගෙවන බොහෝ දෙනෙකු සිටියත්, ඒ ගැන කථා කරන්නට ඉදිරිපත් වන්නේ ඉතා ටික දෙනයි.

මේවාට යොමු වන්නෝ මොහොතක් සිතා බැලුවොත් තමන් කරන දෙයෙහි නිශ්ඵල බව පෙනී යාවි. උදාහරණයකට දේව අනුග්‍රහයෙන් විභාග සමත් විය හැකි නම් කපුවන්ගේ දරුවන් ප්‍රසිද්ධ විභාග සියල්ලෙන් උසස්ම ප්‍රතිඵල ගත යුතුයි නේද? ගුප්ත ශාස්ත්‍රකරුවන් ඉතා ඉසුරුමත් විය යුතුයි නේද?

මීට අමතරව රටේ රාජ්‍ය නායකයා තම ග්‍රහණයට හසු කර ගෙන, රාජ්‍යයේ සියලු වැදගත් තීරණවලට ජ්‍යොතිෂවේදීන් බලපෑම් කළ සැටිත්, අන්තිමේදී ඔවුන්ගේ උපදෙස් මත කලින් ජනපතිවරණයක් පවත්වා හිටපු නායකයා සිය ධූර කාලයෙන් වසර දෙකක් අහිමි කර ගත් සැටිත් අප දන්නවා.

23 Nov 2014: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #195: අපේ රටේ බලවත්ම පුද්ගලයෝ ජ්‍යොතිර් ඇදුරන්ද?

අනෙක් පසෙකින් ඕනෑම  කුමන්ත්‍රණවාදී තර්කයන් කිසිදු විමර්ශනයකින් තොරව විශ්වාස කරන ලාංකිකයන් සංඛ්‍යාව අති විශාලයි. මෙයට උදාහරණ ඕනෑ තරම් තිබෙනවා.

රටේ බහුතර ජන කොටස වඳ බවට පත් කිරීමේ උත්සාහයන් ගැන, නැතිනම්  සමස්ත ශ්‍රී ලංකාවටම කර ඇතැයි කියන සාපයන් ගැන ප්‍රබන්ධ කථා පැතිර යන්නේ අධිවේගයෙන්.

එයට සමාන්තරව රටේ ආරක්ෂාවට, ආර්ථීකය හා රජයට එරෙහිව විවිධ ජාත්‍යන්තර කුමන්ත්‍රණ දිග හැරෙනවාය යන්න අපේ බොහෝ දෙනා විශ්වාස කරනවා. මේ කිසිවක් සඳහා සාක්ෂි ඉල්ලා සිටින්නේ නැහැ.

Words of Dr Abraham Thomas Kovoor (1898 – 1978), rationalist

Words of Dr Abraham Thomas Kovoor (1898 – 1978), rationalist

හැම තරාතිරමකම ලාංකිකයන් නොමඟ යැවීම මෙතරම් පහසු වී ඇත්තේ ඇයි? පොතේ උගතුන් මුලා කිරීම මින් පර නොවූ විරූ ලෙස අද පසහු වී ඇත්තේ ඇයි?

තාක්ෂණය ප්‍රචලිත වීම හරහා අද ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය, ස්මාට්ෆෝන් භාවිතය පුළුල් වුවත්  ඒ නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා ද අපේ බොහෝ දෙනා තොරතුරු හා අදහස් හුවමාරු කර ගන්නේ කිසිදු විචාර බුද්ධියකින් තොරවයි.

අතේ තිබෙන ස්මාට්ෆෝන් එක තරම්වත් ස්මාට් නැති අය එමට හමු වනවා! තම තමන්ගේ මෝඩකම්වල ආදීනව ඔවුන්ටම විඳින්නට ඉඩ දී අප බලා සිටිමුද?

එහෙත් තනි පුද්ගලයන්ට එහා යන බිහිසුණු යථාර්ථයක් මෙහි තිබෙනවා. එනම් සමාජයක් ලෙස අයාලේ යැවීමට, රවටවා ගැනීමට සටකපට ඕනැම අයකුට හැකි වීමයි.

මිථ්‍යාව හා අවිචාරය විසින් වෙලා ගත් සමාජයක් දිගටම පවතිනු දැක්මට අවස්ථාවාදී දේශපාලකයන් හා තන්හාධික ව්‍යාපාරිකයන් යන දෙපිරිසම කැමතියි.

please-turn-off-your-brain-cells

කියන ඕනෑම ප්‍රලාපයක්, ගෙඩි පිටින් අදහන ජනතාවක් ගෝත්‍රවාදය, වැඩවසම්වාදය හා ජාතිකවාදය වැනි අන්තවාදී සංකල්ප වෙත හරවා ගැනීම ඉතා පහසුයි.

එක් පසෙකින් එවන් ජනතාවක් රවටා දේශපාලකයන් ඔවුන්ගේ ඡන්දය (හා අනාගතය) ඩැහැ ගන්නා අතර අනෙක් පසින් මෝඩ ජනතාව මුලා කර වංචනික වෙළඳෙ ප්‍රචාරණ හරහා ව්‍යාපාරිකයන් ඔවුන්ගේ මිළමුදල් හීන්සීරුවේ ලබා ගන්නවා. (සුදු වෙන්න, ස්මාට් වෙන්න, ඇඟ නොවෙහෙසා ෆිට් වෙන්න, කඩිනම් ප්‍රතිකර්ම කෙතරම් අද දවසේ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ප්‍රසිද්ධියේම අලෙවිකරණය කරනවාද?)

විද්‍යාත්මක සාක්ෂරතාවය අවශ්‍ය වන්නේ මේ සැමගෙන් බේරී, අපේ ඡන්දය, මිළ මුදල්, පණ කෙන්ද හා ආත්ම ගරුත්වය රැක ගැනීමටයි.

විද්‍යාත්මක  සාක්ෂරතාවය අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස සංකීර්ණ කර ගත යුතු නැහැ. එයට තුඩු දෙන ඔවදන් අපේ ජන විඥානයේම තිබෙනවා. ”කියන්නා කෙසේ කීවත් අසන්නා සිහි බුද්ධියෙන් ඇසිය යුතුයි’ යන්න එවැන්නක්.

විද්‍යාත්මක චින්තනය ප්‍රගුණ කර ගත්තෝ කිසිවක් එකවර පිළි ගන්නේ නැහැ. ප්‍රශ්න කරනවා. සාක්ෂි සොයනවා. භෞතික සිද්ධියක් නම් එය හොඳින් නිරීක්ෂණය කරනවා. අත්හදා බැලිය හැකි නම් එසේ කරනවා. හැම දෙයක්ම සංශයවාදීව (skeptically) විමර්ශනය කරනවා.

එසේ කොට යමක් තේරුම් ගෙන පිළිගත්තද නව දැනුමට හා නව විග්‍රහයන්ට ඔවුන් විවෘතයි. ඔවුන්ගේ මනස එක තැන පල් වෙන්නේ නෑ.

විද්‍යාත්මක සාක්ෂරතාව හෙවත් චින්තනයට පෙරදිග, බටහිර ක්‍රියා වෙනසක් නැහැ. පෙරදිගින් බිහි වූ බුදුදහම වැනි සාමයික චින්තන ක්‍රමවලත්, බටහිර තර්ක ශාස්ත්‍රඥයන්ගේ ඉගැන්වීම්වලත් අවධාරණය කරන්නේ ඕනෑම දෙයක් ඉතා හොඳින් විමර්ශනය කිරීමේ අවශ්‍යතාවයයි.

Arthur C Clarke quote on balancing traditions and modernity (Sinhala translation from UNESCO Kalinga Award acceptance speech, 1962)

Arthur C Clarke quote on balancing traditions and modernity (Sinhala translation from UNESCO Kalinga Award acceptance speech, 1962)

ශ‍්‍රීමත් ආතර් සී. ක්ලාක් අඩ සියවසක් පුරා මෙරට වාසය කරමින් නිතර ලක් සමාජයට අවවාද කළේත් මෙයයි.

විද්‍යාව ජනප්‍රිය කිරීමට ලෝක මට්ටමින් කරන විද්වත් දායකත්වය සඳහා යුනෙස්කෝ පිරිනමන කාලිංග සම්මානය 1961දී හිමි වූයේ ක්ලාක්ටයි. එය ලබා ගනිමින් ඔහු 1962 සැප්තැම්බරයේ නවදිල්ලියේදී කළ කථාවේ අවසාන වැකි කිහිපය අඩසියවසක් ගත වී තවමත් අපට අදාල කර ගත හැකියි.

“තර්කානුකූලව හා සාක්ෂි මත පදනම් වූ චින්තනයක් පෙර අපර දෙදිග සියලු රටවලට අවශ්‍යයි. එය වඩාත් හදිසි අවශ්‍යතාවක් වන්නේ දියුණු වෙමින් පවතින රටවලයි. ආසියාවේ හා අප්‍රිකාවේ බොහෝ රටවල මිලියන් ගණනක් ජනයා භෞතික, මානසික හා ආධ්‍යාත්මික දරිද්‍රතාවයේ ඇද බැඳ තබන ප්‍රබල සාධක දෙකක් තිබෙනවා. එනම් අන්ධ භක්තිය හා මිථ්‍යා විශ්වාසයි.

 “විද්‍යාව එහි සාංස්කෘතිකමය හා තාක්ෂ‚ක යන මුහුණුවර දෙකෙන් ම මේ පසුගාමී සාධකවලට එරෙහි වනවා. ගතානුගතිකත්වයේ යදම් බිඳ දමා මුළු මහත් ජාතීන් වඩා යහපත් ජීවන තත්ත්වයන් වෙත කැඳවා ගෙන යන්නට විද්‍යාත්මක චින්තනය මඟ පෙන්වනවා.

 “විවෘත මනසින් යුතුව හා විචාරශීලිව හැම දෙයක් ම ප්‍රශ්න කිරීම විද්‍යාවේ ක්‍රමවේදයයි. ඉන්ද්‍රිය ගෝචර ප්‍රත්‍යක්ෂ හරහා මතු වන දේ අපේ එල්බ ගත් විශ්වාසවලට පටහැනි වන විට දී පවා එය පිළිගැනීම විද්‍යාවේ විනයයි.

 “එහෙත් අන්තවාදියාගේ ආදර්ශ පාඨය වන්නේ කරුණු හා තර්ක ඉදිරිපත් කරන්නට එපා – මගේ තීරණය අවසාන විනිශ්චයයියන්නයි. එබඳු අධිපතිවාදයක් විද්‍යාවේ නැති නිසා අන්තවාදීන්ට විද්‍යාවේ තැනක් ද නැහැ.

 “මිථ්‍යා විශ්වාස හා ඇදහිලි ඕනෑ තරම් පෙරදිග රටවල හමු වනවා. සමහරක් ඒවා අහිංසක නොමඟ යාම් වූවත් ඇතැම් ඒවා පුද්ගලයන්ට හා ජන සමාජයන්ට ඉතා අහිතකරයි…හැම රටක හා ජාතියක ම අතීතයේ ආයාසයෙන් ප්‍රතිකේෂප කළ යුතු ඇතැම් උරුමයන් ද තිබෙනවා.

 “ගැඹුරට විග්‍රහ කළ විට විද්‍යාව යනු තර්කානුකූලව සිතීම හා විචාරශීලිව ලෝකය හා සමාජය දෙස බැලීමයි. අප ඉවත ලිය යුත්තේ කුමක් ද හා තව දුරටත් පවත්වා ගනිමින් ප්‍රවර්ධනය කළ යුත්තේ කුමක් ද යන්න එබඳු චින්තන ක්‍රමවේදයකින් අපට වෙන් කර ගත හැකියි. අනාගතයට දිවෙන අවිනිශ්චිත මාර්ගයෙහි අපට හොඳම මඟ පෙන්වන්නන් ත්‍රිත්වය වනුයේ විද්‍යාත්මක චින්තනය, සහජයෙන් අප ලබන ප්‍රඥාව හා අමාරුවෙන් ප්‍රගුණ කර ගත යුතු දුරදක්නා නුවණයි.”

ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ විද්‍යාත්මක  සාක්ෂරතාවය ප්‍රවර්ධනය කිරීමේ වගකීම විධිමත් අවධ්‍යාපන ක්ෂේත්‍රයට (පාසල් හා සරසවි) සීමා කළ නොහැකියි. ඒ සඳහා සිවිල් සමාජ පෙළගැස්මක්, මාධ්‍ය ප්‍රබුද්ධයන්ගේ දායකත්වයක් හා වෘත්තිකයන්ගේ සහභාගිත්වයක් අවශ්‍යයි.

පරම්පරාවකට පෙර ජාතික ප්‍රතිශක්තිකරණ වැඩසටහන සමාජගත කරන්නට කලාකරුවන්ල විද්වතුන් හා වෙනත් බොහෝ අය හවුල් වුණා. බුද්ධි ප්‍රතිශක්තිකරණයටත් එවන් ප්‍රයත්නයක් ඕනෑ!

Read also: සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #96: ආතර් සී. ක්ලාක් නැවත කියවමු!

[Op-ed] Scientific Literacy: ‘Mind Vaccine’ Sri Lanka Urgently Needs

This op-ed essay was published in Daily FT newspaper, Sri Lanka, on 7 September 2016.

Scientific Literacy: ‘Mind Vaccine’ Sri Lanka Urgently Needs

By Nalaka Gunawardene

 

STS Forum Sri Lanka

STS Forum Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s first Science and Technology for Society (STS) Forum will take place from 7 to 10 September in Colombo. Organized by the Prime Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Research, it is one of the largest gatherings of its kind to be hosted by Sri Lanka.

Modelled on Japan’s well known annual STS forums, this event will be attended by over 750 participants coming from 24 countries – among them will be local and foreign scientists, inventors, science managers, science communicators and students.

untitled-614What sets STS Forums apart is that they are not merely events where scientists talk to each other.  That surely will happen, but there will be many more voices and, hopefully, much broader conversations.

As a member of the content planning team for this event, my particular focus has been on the strand called “citizen science” – interpreted, in this instance, as activities that enhance the public understanding of science and technology.

Under this strand, there will be four sessions that explore: community involvement in science and research; informal science education for the 21st century; communicating science, technology and innovation; and using social media for discussing science.

At first glance, these topics don’t seem as exciting as nanotechnology, robotics and space technology that are being covered in other sessions. But I would argue that public engagement is the most decisive factor if science and technology are to play a significant role in the economic development and future prosperity of Sri Lanka.

Wanted: Mind Vaccines!

Public engagement of science goes well beyond teaching science and technology subjects in schools or universities. It is also bigger than (state or private sector driven) science centres, exhibitions or science content in the media. All these elements help, but at its most basic, what we need to promote is a way of thinking known as scientific literacy.

Scientific literacy is defined as “the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs, and economic productivity”.

Indeed, some basic scientific knowledge and technical skills have become essential for survival in the 21st century. But scientific literacy provides more than just utility benefits.

As Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson, American astrophysicist, cosmologist and science communicator, says, “Scientific literacy is an intellectual vaccine against the claims of charlatans who would exploit ignorance.”

Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson: One man worth cloning if that were feasible...

Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson: One man worth cloning if that were feasible…

Sri Lanka takes justified pride in its high literacy levels and equally high coverage of vaccination against infectious diseases. But we cannot claim to have a high level of scientific literacy.

If we did, it would not be so easy for far-fetched conspiracy theories to spread rapidly even among educated persons. For example, claims of an ‘infertility plot’ to make majority ethnic group lose its ability to reproduce. Or tales of miracle waters and ‘cosmic forces’ healing those terminally ill. Or alien spacecraft (allegedly) threatening national security…

It is customary to temporarily suspend our disbelief to enjoy films, novels and other creative art forms. But most of us don’t confuse fiction with fact, even with highly plausible scenarios.

Yet when it comes to real life, as opposed to art, has ‘suspended disbelief’ become a permanent, default setting for many Lankans today? Is our society more gullible and paranoid now than it was a generation or two ago? If so, how come?

These inconvenient questions are worth asking, if only to make us pause and think.

Sleepwalking Nation?

Dr Abraham Thomas Kovoor (1898 – 1978): Myth-buster who feared none

Dr Abraham Thomas Kovoor (1898 – 1978): Myth-buster who feared none

Half a century ago, a Kerala-born science teacher named Dr Abraham Thomas Kovoor (1898 – 1978) settled down in newly independent Ceylon. After retirement, he took to investigating so-called supernatural phenomena and paranormal practices. He found adequate physical or psychological explanations for almost all of them. In that process, he exposed many ‘god men’ who were thriving on people’s ignorance, gullibility and insecurities.

Dr Kovoor, who founded Ceylon Rationalist Association in 1960, summed it up in these words: “He who does not allow his miracles to be investigated is a crook; he who does not have the courage to investigate a miracle is gullible; and he who is prepared to believe without verification is a fool.”

Most Lankans would fall into one of these three categories – and the minority with open minds are under ‘peer pressure’ to assimilate!

Progress of science and technology since the 1960s has given us many gadgets and media tools, but the more information we have, the less we seem to be able to think for ourselves.  Thus, we have broadband alongside narrow minds, a poor juxtaposition!

This has been building up for some years. In an op-ed titled ‘Can Rationalists Awaken the Sleep-walking Lankan Nation?’ published in Groundviews.org in January 2012, I wrote: “Paradoxically, we now have far more communication channels and technologies yet decidedly fewer opportunities and platforms for dispassionate public debate. Today’s Lankan society welcomes and blindly follows Malayalis who claim to know more about our personal pasts and futures than we’d ever know ourselves. And when we see how our political and business elite patronize Sai Baba, Sri Chinmoy and other gurus so uncritically, we must wonder if there is any intelligent life in Colombo…”

Not every source of mass hallucination is imported, of course. As I noted four years ago, “Sacred cows, it seems, have multiplied faster than humans in the past half century. Our cacophonous airwaves and multi-colour Sunday newspapers are bustling with an embarrassment of choice for salvation, wealth, matrimony, retribution and various other ‘quick fixes’ for this life and (imagined) next ones. Embarrassment, indeed!”

Science for All

So what is to be done?

The proliferation of smartphones and other digital tools have not necessarily opened our minds, or made us Lankans any less gullible to charlatans or zealots. This is a huge conundrum of our times.

stiThat is because mastery over gadgets does not necessarily give us scientific literacy. It involves a rational thought process that entails questioning, observing physical reality, testing, hypothesizing, analyzing and then discussing (not always in that order).

A healthy dose of scepticism is essential to safeguard ourselves from superstitions, political claims and increasingly sophisticated – but often dishonest – product advertising. That’s what scientific literacy builds inside our minds.

Unless we make scientific literacy an integral part of everyone’s lives, ambitious state policies and programmes to modernize the nation could well be jeopardized. Progress can be undermined — or even reversed — by extremist forces of tribalism, feudalism and ultra-nationalism that thrive in a society that lacks the ability to think critically.

A sporting analogy can illustrate what is needed. Cricket is undisputedly our national passion. It is played professionally only by a handful of men (and even fewer women) who make up the national teams and pools. But most of the 21 million Lankans know enough about cricket to follow and appreciate this very English game.

Similarly, there are only a few thousand Lankans engaged in researching or teaching different branches of science and technology – they are the ‘professionals’ who do it for a living. But in today’s world, the rest of society also needs to know at least the basic concepts of science.

Cricket didn’t has become part of our socio-cultural landscape overnight. It took years of innovation and persistence, especially by trail-blazing radio cricket commentators in Sinhala and Tamil. By the time we achieved Test status in 1981, all levels of our society were familiar with cricket’s rules and nuances.

Giving everyone a minimum dose of scientific literacy requires a similar marshalling of forces – including civil society mobilization, media collaboration, creative innovation and social marketing.

‘Science for All’ acquires true meaning only when every citizen – irrespective of education, profession or income level – gets enough skepticism to avoid being exploited by various scams or misled by conspiracy theorists.

Are we ready to embark on this intellectual vaccination process?

Award-winning science writer Nalaka Gunawardene counts over 25 years of national and international media experience. He blogs at https://nalakagunawardene.com and is active on Twitter as @NalakaG