Air Pollution causes cancer, confirms WHO

News feature written for Ceylon Today newspaper, 19 Oct 2013

Air Pollution causes cancer, confirms WHO

By Nalaka Gunawardene

Air pollution causes cancer, it is now medically confirmed.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has just classified outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans.

car pollution - B&W cartoon 2Exposure to air pollution can cause cancer in lungs, and also increase the risk of cancer in the bladder, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of WHO, announced this week.

Close to a quarter million people already die every year from lung cancer caused by air pollution, WHO estimates.

In a statement, IARC said: “After thoroughly reviewing the latest available scientific literature, the world’s leading experts convened by the IARC Monographs Programme concluded that there is sufficient evidence that exposure to outdoor air pollution causes lung cancer (Group 1).”

They also noted a “positive association” with an increased risk of bladder cancer.

Depending on the level of exposure in different parts of the world, the risk was found to be similar to that of breathing in second-hand tobacco smoke.

“The air we breathe has become polluted with a mixture of cancer-causing substances,” says Dr Kurt Straif, Head of the IARC Monographs Section that ranks carcinogens. “We now know that outdoor air pollution is not only a major risk to health in general, but also a leading environmental cause of cancer deaths.”

Particulate matter — tiny pieces of solid or liquid matter floating in the air, and a major component of outdoor air pollution– was evaluated separately and was also classified as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1).

Outdoor air pollution – emitted mostly by transport, thermal power generation, industrial and agricultural activities — is already known to cause a range of respiratory and heart diseases. In Sri Lanka, more than 60% comes from vehicles burning petrol and diesel fuel.

The IARC Monographs Programme, dubbed the “encyclopaedia of carcinogens”, provides an authoritative source of scientific evidence on cancer-causing substances and exposures.

IARC adds substances, mixtures and exposure circumstances to Group 1 only when there is sufficient evidence of cancer-causing ability (carcinogenicity) in humans.

The Group 1 list – with definite links to cancer — now exceeds 100, and includes well known elements such as tobacco smoking, arsenic, asbestos, formaldehyde and ultraviolet rays in sunlight.

The link between tobacco smoking and lung cancer has long been established but now focus is on other cancer-causing air pollutants. In June 2012, IARC declared that diesel engine fumes can certainly cause cancer, especially lung cancer, and upgraded it to Group 1. Earlier, diesel fumes were in group 2A of probable carcinogens for over two decades.

“Classifying outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans is an important step,” says IARC Director Dr Christopher Wild. “There are effective ways to reduce air pollution and, given the scale of the exposure affecting people worldwide, this report should send a strong signal to the international community to take action without further delay.”

Although the composition of air pollution and levels of exposure can vary dramatically between locations, the conclusions of the IARC Working Group apply to all regions of the world.

Air pollution is a basket term, which covers dozens of individual chemical compounds and particulates. These vary around the world due to differences in the sources of pollution, climate and weather. But IARC now confirms that the mixtures of ambient air pollution “invariably contain specific chemicals known to be carcinogenic to humans”.

It is only in recent years that the true magnitude of the disease burden due to air pollution has been quantified. According to WHO, exposure to ambient fine particles contributed 3.2 million premature deaths worldwide in 2010. Much of this was due to heart disease triggered by bad air, but 223 000 deaths were from lung cancer.

More than half of the lung cancer deaths attributable to ambient fine particles are believed to have been in China and other East Asian countries.

In the past, IARC evaluated many individual chemicals and specific mixtures that occur in outdoor air pollution. These included diesel engine exhaust, solvents, metals, and dusts. But this is the first time that experts have classified outdoor air pollution as a cause of cancer.

IARC Monographs are based on the independent review of hundreds of scientific papers from studies worldwide. In this instance, studies analysed the carcinogenicity of various pollutants present in outdoor air pollution, especially particulate matter and transportation-related pollution.

The evaluation was driven by findings from large epidemiological studies that included millions of people living in Europe, North and South America, and Asia. A summary is to be published in the medical journal The Lancet Oncology online on 24 October 2013.

Air Pollution causes cancer, Ceylon Today, 19 Oct 2013

Air Pollution causes cancer, Ceylon Today, 19 Oct 2013

Advertisements

Communication expertise as essential disease outbreak control

CBA President Moneeza Hashmi oepns workshop on Pandemics and broadcasting, Manado, 28 May 2013

CBA President Moneeza Hashmi opens workshop on Pandemics and broadcasting, Manado, 28 May 2013

The discussion on the role of information and communication in disaster situations continues. Media-based communication is vitally necessary, but not sufficient, in meeting the multiple information needs of disaster risk reduction and disaster management. Other forms of participatory, non-media communications are needed to create more resilient communities.

During the past decade, the world’s humanitarian and disaster management communities have acknowledged the central and crucial role of communications — not just for outreach, but as a frontline activity and a core component of response.

An Asian broadcasters’ workshop I just facilitated during Asia Media Summit 2013 in Manado, Indonesia, once again reaffirmed this. It was titled: Be Prepared: Managing Your Organisation through a Global Pandemic.

It was organised by the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) in collaboration with the Asia Pacific Institute for Broadcasting Development (AIBD), and held on 28 May 2013.

WHO_CDS_2005_28enProviding vital context to our discussions was the World Health Organization (WHO)’s Outbreak Communication Guidelines of 2005 [WHO/CDS/2005.28].

Perhaps the most significant sentence in the booklet is this: “WHO believes it is now time to acknowledge that communication expertise has become an essential outbreak control as epidemiological training & laboratory analysis…”

It is preceded by this candid appraisal: “Communication, generally through the media, is another feature of the outbreak environment. Unfortunately, examples abound of communication failures which have delayed outbreak control, undermined public trust and compliance, and unnecessarily prolonged economic, social and political turmoil.”

The document is certainly a leap forward in thinking, but eight years since it was published, the ICT and media realities have changed drastically. As I noted in my opening remarks, social media, then fledgling, have exploded and completely changed the dynamics of emergency communications.

In a recent op-ed published in SciDev.Net, Rohan Samarajiva and I made this point: “The proliferation of ICTs adds a new dimension to disaster warnings. Having many information sources, dissemination channels and access devices is certainly better than few or none. However, the resulting cacophony makes it difficult to achieve a coherent and coordinated response…”

We added: “The controlled release of information is no longer an option for any government. In the age of social media and 24/7 news channels, many people will learn of distant hazards independently of official sources.”

Read full essay: Crying wolf over disasters undermines future warnings by Rohan Samarajiva & Nalaka Gunawardene, SciDev.Net, 6 February 2013

CBA - AIBD Workshop on 'Be Prepared Managing Your Organisation through a  Global Pandemic' - Manado, Indonsia, 28 May 2013

CBA – AIBD Workshop on ‘Be Prepared Managing Your Organisation through a Global Pandemic’ – Manado, Indonsia, 28 May 2013

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #90: වකුගඩු රෝගය හරහා මතුවන ‘ජනමාධ්‍ය රෝගය’

In Sri Lanka, mass kidney failure during the past two decades has been followed by what I call a mass media failure. Most of our media have failed to understand, analyse and report adequately on this public health emergency. Instead of helping affected people and policy makers to work out solutions, some journalists have become amplifiers of extreme activist positions.

I talked about this at at the International Science Communication Leadership Workshop, held as part of Association of Academies & Societies of Sciences in Asia (AASSA) General Assembly in Colombo, 16-19 October 2012. An English article based on my talk appeared in Ceylon Today a few days ago:
Mass Kidney Failure & Mass Media Failure: Go ‘Upstream’ for Remedies!

I have just written up similar views (NOT a translation!) for my weekend Sinhala language column in Ravaya broadsheet newspaper:

CKDu infographic courtesy Center for Public Integrity, USA

ආසියා පැසිෆික් කලාපයේ ජාතික විද්‍යා ඇකඩමි එකතුවේ ජාත්‍යාන්තර සමුළුවක් ඔක්තෝබර් 16-19 දිනවල කොළඹදී පැවැත් වුණා. එහි එක් අංගයක් ලෙස විද්‍යා සන්නිවේදන නායකත්වය ගැන එක් දින සැසිවාරයක් සංවිධානය කර තිබූ අතර විවිධ රටවලින් පැමිණි ආරාධිතයන් එය අමතා කථා කළා.

අපේ ජාතික විද්‍යා ඇකඩමියේ ඇරැයුමින් එයට සහභාගි වූ මට පසුව පෙනී ගියේ විද්‍යා සන්නිවේදනය ගැන ශී‍්‍ර ලංකාවෙන් කථා කළ එක ම දේශකයා මා බවයි. සාමාන්‍යයෙන් එබඳු අවස්ථාවල සත්කාරක රටේ දේශකයන් තෝරා ගන්නේ විවාදයට ලක් නොවන, ජාතිකත්වය මතු කරන ආකාරයේ ප‍්‍රවේශම් සහගත තේමාවක්.

එහෙත් ඇඟ බේරා ගෙන කථා කිරීමේ නිල අවශ්‍යතාවයක් හෝ වෘත්තිමය පුරුද්දක් හෝ මට නැති නිසා මෙරට පැන නැගී ඇති, විද්‍යා සන්නිවේදනයට ද බරපතල අභියෝග එල්ල කරන මාතෘකාවක් ගැන මා විවෘතව අදහස් දැක්වූවා. එනම් රජරටින් මතුව ආ නිදන්ගත වකුගඩු රෝගය හා එයට ලක් සමාජයේත්, මෙරට මාධ්‍යවලත් ප‍්‍රතිචාරයයි. අද මා ගොනු කරන්නේ ඒ වියත් සභාවට මා දැක් වූ අදහස්වල සම්පිණ්ඩනයක්.

2012 සැප්තැම්බර් 2 වනදා කොලමින් (වකුගඩු රෝගයේ විද්‍යාව හා විජ්ජාව) මා කී පරිදි මෙය මාධ්‍යවලට ප‍්‍රබල මාතෘකාවක් වුවත් ලෙහෙසියෙන් ග‍්‍රහණය කර ගත හැකි දෙයක් නොවෙයි. වකුගඩු රෝගයේ හේතුකාරක විය හැකි සාධක ගණනාවක් ගැන තවමත් නොවිසඳුණු විද්‍යාත්මක වාද විවාද තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් සම්පූර්ණ සත්‍ය අවබෝධයක් මතු වන තුරු පිළියම් යෙදීම ප‍්‍රමාද කරන්නටත් නොහැකියි.

දැනටමත් රෝගාතුර වූ සියළු දෙනාට අවශ්‍ය වෛද්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිකාර සපයන අතර එම රෝගය වාර්තා වන ප‍්‍රදේශවල වෙසෙන සෙසු ජනයාට ප‍්‍රවේශම් විය හැකි ප‍්‍රායෝගික ක‍්‍රම සොයා දීම හා දැනුවත් කිරීම වැදගත්. මෙහිදී පිවිතුරු පානීය ජලය සැපයීමේ වැදගත්කම පිළි ගෙන තිබෙනවා.

වකුගඩු ශරීරයේ ඉතා වැදගත් කාර්යයක් ඉටු කරනවා. රුධිරයේ බහිශ‍්‍රාවීය ද්‍රව්‍ය හා වැඩිපුර ජලය පෙරා වෙන් කොට බැහැර කිරීම නියාමනය කරන්නේත්, ඒ හරහා රුධිරයේ හා ශරීරයේ රසායනික සමතුලිතතාව පවත්වා ගන්නේත් වකුගඩු මගින්. එය දිවා රාත‍්‍රී කි‍්‍රයා කරන පෙරහනක් වැනියි.

සමස්ත සමාජය දෙස බැලූ විට ජන මාධ්‍යවල සමාජයීය භූමිකාවත් එයට සමානයි. නිවැරදි තොරතුරුත්, නිරවුල් විග‍්‍රහයනුත් සමාජයට ඉතිරි කරමින් සම්ප‍්‍රපලාපයන්, මුසාවන්, මිථ්‍යාවන් හා අනෙකුත් විකෘති කිරීම් බැහැර කිරීම මාධ්‍යවලින් සමාජය බලාපොරොත්තු වනවා.

රෝගී වූ වකුගඩුවලට ජෛව විද්‍යාත්මක කාර්යය හරිහැටි කරන්නට නොහැකි වනවා සේ ම ‘රෝගී’ වූ ජනමාධ්‍යවලට ද සිය සමාජ මෙහෙවර හරිහැටි කර ගත නොහැකි බව මගේ මතයයි. මෙය මා ඉංග‍්‍රීසියෙන් කීවේ “Mass kidney failure is followed by a mass media failure” කියායි.

මෙසේ කියන්නේ මෙරට සිංහල හා ඉංග‍්‍රීසි මාධ්‍ය (පාරිසරික සගරා හෝ විශේෂිත වාර ප‍්‍රකාශන නොවේ) වකුගඩු රෝගය වාර්තා කරන ආකාරය ගැන කලක් තිස්සේ ඕනෑකමින් බලා සිටින, මේ ක්‍ෂේත‍්‍රයේ ම පය ගසා සිටින කෙනෙකු හැටියටයි.

මුද්‍රිත මාධ්‍ය ගත් විට, අන්තර්ගතය මූලිකව කොටස් තුනකට බෙදිය හැකියි. කර්තෘ මණ්ඩල සම්බන්ධයක් නැති, එහෙත් පැවැත්මට අවශ්‍ය වෙළඳ දැන්වීම් එක් කොටසක්. ඉතිරි කියවන අන්තර්ගතය තුළ ද මාණ්ඩලික ලේඛකයන් ලියන දේ මෙන් ම බැහැර සිට ලබා දෙන විද්වත් ලිපි තිබෙනවා. විද්වත් ලිපිවල මත දැක්වීම ඒවා ලියන අයගේයි. මා මෙහිදී අවධානය යොමු කරන්නේ කර්තෘ මාණ්ඩලික ලේඛකයන් අතින් ලියැවෙන මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතය ගැනයි. මාධ්‍ය කලාවේ සාරධර්ම රැකීම වැඩිපුර අපේක්‍ෂා කරන්නේත් මේ සන්නිවේදන තුළයි.

පුවත්පත් කලාවේ මූලික සාරධර්මයක් ලෙස සැළකෙන්නේ සමබරතාවය රැකෙන පරිදි වාර්තාකරණය විය යුතු බවයි. එනම් ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් හෝ සිද්ධියක් ගැන වාර්තා හෝ විග‍්‍රහ කරන විට එයට සම්බන්ධ සියළු පාර්ශවයන්ට සාධාරණ නියෝජනයක් ලබා දීමයි.

වකුගඩු රෝගය පිළිබඳ වාර්තාකරණයේදී අපේ ඇතැම් පුවත්පත් හා විද්යුත් මාධ්‍ය නාලිකා ක‍්‍රියා කර ඇත්තේ එබඳු පුළුල් විග‍්‍රහයක යෙදෙන අන්දමින් නොවෙයි. සංකීර්ණ ප‍්‍රශ්නයේ විවිධ පැතිකඩ ග‍්‍රාහකයන්ට නොවලහා ඉදිරිපත් කොට අවසාන විනිශ්චය ඔවුන්ට භාර කරනු වෙනුවට තෝරා ගත් තොරතුරු හා මතවාදයන් කිහිපයක් පමණක් ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කරනු දැකිය හැකියි. එයට සමාන්තරව තමන් ප‍්‍රවර්ධනය කරන මතවාදයට වෙනස් වූ මතවලට හා එම මතධාරීන්ට සමච්චල් කිරීමත්, ඇතැම් විට වාග් ප‍්‍රහාර එල්ල කිරීමත් සිදු වනවා.

පරිසර සංරක්‍ෂණය හා මහජන සෞඛ්‍යය වැනි පොදු උන්නතියට සෘජුව අදාල තේමා ගැන මාධ්‍ය වාර්තාකරණයේ නියැලෙන විට මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ගේ භූමිකාව කෙසේ විය යුතු ද?

කලක් තිස්සේ ලොව පුරා මාධ්‍ය සම්ප‍්‍රදායක් වූයේ මාධ්‍යවේදියාගේ පෞද්ගලික මතිමතාන්තර වාර්තාකරණයට මිශ‍්‍ර නොකළ යුතු බවයි. යම් මතවාදයක් හෝ අදහසක් පළ කරන්නට ඕනෑ නම් එය කතුවැකියට හෝ කතුවැකි පිටුවේ මත දැක්වීමට සීමා වුණා. එහෙත් 1970 දශකයේ පටන් සෞඛ්‍යය, පරිසරය හා මානව මානව හිමිකම් ආදී තේමා ගැන මාධ්‍ය වාර්තාකරණයේදී මාධ්‍යවේදියා දරණ ස්ථාවරය හා මතය ද යම් තාක් දුරට වාර්තාකරණයේ පිළිබිඹු වීම සාධාරණ යයි ප‍්‍රගතිශීලී මාධ්‍යකරුවන් අතර පිළි ගැනීමක් මතුව ආවා. මෙය ඉංග‍්‍රීසියෙන් advocacy journalism ලෙස හඳුන්වනවා.

නාගරික සිදුවීම් හා පුවත් මවන්නන් කේන්ද්‍ර කොට ගත් අපේ බොහෝ ජනමාධ්‍ය මුල් කාලයේ වකුගඩු රෝගය වාර්තා කලේ ඉඳහිට හා යාන්තමට. එය බොහෝ දෙනෙකුට බලපාන රෝගයක් බව පසක් වූ විට මේ තත්ත්වය වෙනස් වූවත්, තවමත් විවිධ මානයන් විග‍්‍රහ කරමින් සානුකම්පික වූත්, මැදහත් වූත් වාර්තාකරණයක් කරන්නට අපේ බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය සමත් වී නැහැ.

ඒ වෙනුවට වකුගඩු රෝගය සංත‍්‍රාසය දනවන හෙඩිම් සපයන හා හරිත ක‍්‍රියාකාරිකයන් සමහර දෙනෙකුගේ න්‍යාය පත‍්‍රයට අනුගත වන අන්දමේ මාධ්‍ය ”කට ගැස්මක්” බවට පත් වී තිබෙන බව කණගාටුවෙන් වුවත් පිළිගත යුතුයි.

වකුගඩු රෝගය වාර්තාකරණයේදී ඉස්මතුව එන්නේ පොදුවේ අපේ ජනමාධ්‍ය ෙක්‍ෂත‍්‍රයේ පවතින විසමතා හා දුර්වලතායි. එයින් සමහරක් නම්: ප‍්‍රශ්නයක විවිධ පැතිකඩ විපරම් කරනු වෙනුවට මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හෝ මාධ්‍ය ආයතන පෙර තේරීමක් කළ පැතිකඩ දෙක තුනකට පමණක් අවධානය යොමු කිරීමත අදාල පාර්ශවයන් කිහිපයක් සිටින අවස්ථාවක තෝරා ගත් දෙතුන් දෙනෙකුගේ මත පමණක් දිගට ම විස්තාරණය කිරීමත සහ සංකීර්ණ ප‍්‍රශ්නයක් උවමනාවට වඩා සරලව හා මතුපිටින් පමණක් කඩිමුඩියේ වාර්තා කිරීම හරහා ග‍්‍රාහකයන්ගේ මනස වඩාත් ව්‍යාකූල කිරීම.

එමෙන්ම තහවුරු කරගත් තොරතුරු මත වාර්තාකරණය පදනම් කර ගන්නවා වෙනුවට ඕපාදුප, කුමන්ත‍්‍රණවාදී පරිකල්පනයන් හා ප‍්‍රහාරාත්මක බස හැසිරවීම ද අපේ මාධ්‍ය ක්‍ෂේත‍්‍රයේ නිතර දැකිය හැකියි.

මෙය අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනයේ හා මාධ්‍ය නිදහසේ කොටසක් යයි යමකුට කිව හැකියි. තර්කයක් ලෙස එය සත්‍ය වුවත්, ආපදා හා වෙනත් හදිසි අවස්ථාවල විශාල ජන සංඛ්‍යාවක් විපතට හා දුකට පත්ව සිටින විට, එය කි‍්‍රකට් තරඟාවලියක් හෝ මැතිවරණයක් හෝ ගැන වාර්තා කරනවාට වඩා සංයමයකින් හා සංවේදීව කරනු ඇතැයි මාධ්‍ය ග‍්‍රාහකයන් අපේක්ෂා කරනවා.

මාධ්‍යවේදීන්ට තොරතුරු මූලාශ‍්‍ර ඉතා වටිනවා. බොහෝ දෙනෙකු කලක් තිස්සේ උත්සාහයෙන් ගොඩ නඟා ගත් සබඳතා තිබෙනවා. කඩිමුඩියේ දුරකථනයෙන් පවා තොරතුරක් විමසීමට, අදහසක් ලබා ගැනීමට හැකි වීම ලොකු දෙයක්. එහෙත් මූලාශ‍්‍ර වන ඇතැම් දෙනාට තමන්ගේ ම න්‍යාය පත‍්‍ර ද තිබෙනවා. මාධ්‍ය හරහා තම මතවාද පතුරුවන්නට ඔවුන් තැත් කිරීම ඔවුන්ගේ පැත්තෙන් සාධාරණයි. එහෙත් මූලාශ‍්‍රවලට ඕනෑ ලෙසට අවිචාරවත්ව ක‍්‍රියා නොකිරීමටත්, සමබරතාවය පවත්වා ගැනීමටත් මාධ්‍ය ආයතන ප‍්‍රවේශම් විය යුතුයි.

වකුගඩු රෝගයේ මාධ්‍ය වාර්තාකරණය කලක් තිස්සේ බලා සිටින ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ මාධ්‍ය සගයෙකු මට කීවේ මේ ගැන වාර්තාකරණයේදී අපේ බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය තම මූලාශ‍්‍රවලට බෙහෙවින් හෝ මුළුමනින් හෝ නතු වී ඇති බවයි. තර්කානුකූල නොවන, සාක්‍ෂි මත පදනම් නොවූ විග‍්‍රහයන් හා විනිශ්චයන් මහජනතාව අතරට යළි යළිත් ගියේ එනිසායි.

වාර්තාකරණයේ දුර්වලතාවල වගකීම මුළුමනින් මාධ්‍යවලට පැවරීමට ද නොහැකියි. උග‍්‍ර වෙමින් පවතින මේ මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය ප‍්‍රශ්නය හා ඛේදවාචකය ගැන ලෝක සෞඛ්‍ය සංවිධානයේ (WHO) විද්වත් උපදෙස් ඇතිව සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශය 2009-2011 කාලයේ අපේ විද්‍යාඥ කණ්ඩායම් 10ක් හරහා ප‍්‍රශ්නයේ විවිධ පැතිකඩ විමසමින් පර්යේෂණ කළා. එය මේ දක්වා මේ ගැන සිදු කළ වඩාත් ම විස්තරාත්මක අධ්‍යයනයයි. එහි වාර්තාව මේ වසර මුලදී සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යාංශයට භාර දුන්නා. එය මෙතෙක් (2012 ඔක් 31 දක්වා) ප‍්‍රකාශයට පත් නොකිරීම හරහා සෞඛ්‍ය අමාත්‍යංශය ද මේ තත්ත්වය ව්‍යාකූලවීමට ඉඩ හැරියා.

මේ අතර WHO අභ්‍යන්තර වාර්තාවකැයි කියන, එහෙත් කිසිදු නිල ලක්ෂණයක් (ලිපි ශීර්ෂයක්, වැඩි විස්තර ලබා ගත හැකි ක‍්‍රමයක්) නොමැති, පිටු 3ක කෙටි ලේඛනයක් ක‍්‍රියාකාරීන් කිහිප දෙනෙකු 2012 අගෝස්තු මස මැදදී මාධ්‍යවලට ලබා දුන්නා. එය WHOහි බව තහවුරු කිරීමක් හෝ විචාරයක් හෝ නොමැතිව ගෙඩි පිටින් ප‍්‍රකාශයට පත් කිරීමට අපේ ඇතැම් මාධ්‍ය පෙළඹුණා.

විද්‍යාත්මක කරුණක් ගැන අපේ මාධ්‍ය මෙතරම් අපරික්ෂාකාරී වන්නේ ඇයි? දේශපාලනික හෝ ක‍්‍රීඩා ආන්දෝලනයක් ගැන තහවුරු නොවූ ලේඛනයක් ලැබුණොත් මෙලෙසින් එය පළ කිරීමට කතුවරුන් සූදානම් ද?

මේ උද්වේගකාරී වාර්තාකරණය ගැන සාධාරණ ප‍්‍රතිතර්ක මතු කළ ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨ විද්‍යාඥයන් හා වෛද්‍යවරුන් මෙකී මාධ්‍ය විසින් ඉක්මනින් හංවඩු ගසනු ලැබුවේ ”පලිබෝධ නාශක සමාගම්වල මුදල් බලයට නතු වූවන්” හැටියටයි. එයට සාක්ෂි තිබේ ද? නැතිනම් කුමන්ත‍්‍රණවාදී තර්කයක් පමණ ද?

වසර 25ක් පුරා එදත් අදත් මා කියන්නේ පලිබෝධ නාශක, රසායනික පොහොර ඇතුළු සියළු නවීන විද්‍යාත්මක මෙවලම් ප‍්‍රවේශමින් පරිහරණය කළ යුතු බවයි. ඒවාට විරුද්ධවීමේ පූර්ණ අයිතියක් පරිසරවේදීන්ට තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් ඇතැම් පරිසරවේදීන් ප‍්‍රායෝගික විකල්ප යෝජනා නොකර, රාජ්‍ය ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති හා විද්වත් මතයන් විවේචනය කරන විට, එම තර්ක ගැන ප‍්‍රතිපත්ති සම්පාදකයන්ගේ හා මැදහත් විද්වතුන්ගේ මත විමසීමට මාධ්‍යවලට වගකීමක් ද තිබෙනවා.

වකුගඩු රෝගය හා කෘෂි රසායන ද්‍රව්‍ය ගැන සංවාදයේදී අවශ්‍ය තරමට සිදු නොවූයේ ද එයයි. ඒ වෙනුවට ජනතාව බියපත් කරවන, රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරීන් අපහසුතාවයට පත් කරන හා මැදහත් විද්‍යාඥයන්ට නිරපරාදේ චෝදනා එල්ල කරන වාර්තාකරණයක් අප දකිනවා.

මෙබදු වාර්තාකරණයකින් මානසික කම්පනයට පත් මෙරට සිටින ජ්‍යෙෂ්ඨතම විද්‍යා මහාචාර්යවරයෙකු මට කීවේ මෙයයි: “එප්පාවල ඇපටයිට් නිධිය බහු ජාතික සමාගම්වලට දෙන්නට යන විට ප‍්‍රතිපත්තිමය හේතු මත එයට විරුද්ධ වීම නිසා මට මරණ තර්ජන පවා ලැබුණා. එසේ පොදු උන්නතියට ජීවිත කාලයක් ක‍්‍රියා කළ මට, ජනතාවට වස කවන ජාති ද්‍රෝහියකු යයි චෝදනා කරන්නේ ඇයි?”

මේ මහාචාර්යවරයාට දිගට ම අවලාද නගන ජාතික පුවත්පතක්, ඔහු යැවූ පිලිතුර පවා පළ කොට නැහැ. (පිළිතුරු දීමේ අයිතිය සුරැකීමට අපේ බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය ආයතන ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ ප‍්‍රතිඥා දෙනවා.) මේ මහාචාර්යවරයා ඇතුළු විද්‍යාඥයන් රැසක් වකුගඩු රෝගයේ හේතුකාරක ගැන විවිධ කල්පිතයන් ගවේෂණය කරමින් සිටිනවා. ඔවුන්ගේ එක ම අරමුණ මෙහි අක්මුල් පාදා ගැනීමයි.

බලන්න: http://tiny.cc/CKDuMed

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #81: වකුගඩු රෝගයේ විද්‍යාව හා විජ්ජාව

Mass Kidney Failure & Mass Media Failure: Go ‘Upstream’ for Remedies!

Ceylon Today newspaper has just published my article titled: Mass Kidney Failure & Mass Media Failure: Go ‘Upstream’ for Remedies!

It is adapted from a paper I presented last week at the International Science Communication Leadership Workshop, held as part of Association of Academies & Societies of Sciences in Asia (AASSA) General Assembly in Colombo, 16-19 October 2012.

In Sri Lanka, mass kidney failure during the past two decades has been followed by what I call a mass media failure. Most of our media have failed to understand, analyse and report adequately on this public health emergency. Instead of helping affected people and policy makers to work out solutions, some journalists have become amplifiers of extreme activist positions.

As health officials and policy makers struggle with the prolonged humanitarian crisis, partisan media coverage has added to public confusion, suspicion and fear. As a science writer and journalist, I have watched this with growing concern.

This is a critique of the Lankan media sector to which I have belonged, in one way or another, for a quarter century. I hope this will inspire some much-needed self-reflection among our media, which I feel over overstepped the boundaries of advocacy journalism in this issue. As I suggest, a return to first principles can help…

Full article below. Constructive engagement is welcomed.

Mass Kidney Failure & Mass Media Failure – Nalaka Gunawardene – Ceylon Today 25 Oct 2012

Mass Kidney Failure and Mass Media Failure in Sri Lanka

The kidneys are vital organs in our body that help keep the blood clean and chemically balanced through filtering. Healthy kidneys separate waste and excess water.

Similarly, a healthy and vibrant media helps separate fact from fiction, and provides clarity and context vital for an open, pluralistic society to function.

In Sri Lanka, mass kidney failure during the past two decades has been followed by what I see as a mass media failure to understand, analyse and report adequately on this public health emergency. Instead of helping affected people and policy makers to work out solutions, some journalists have become mere amplifiers of extreme activist positions.

As health officials and policy makers struggle with the prolonged humanitarian crisis, partisan media coverage has added to public confusion, suspicion and fear. As a science writer and journalist, I have watched this with growing concern.

I just gave a talk on this to the Science Communication Leadership Workshop which was part of the First General Assembly of Association of Academies and Societies of Sciences in Asia (AASSA) held in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 17 October 2012.

Here is my presentation:

See also my recent writing on this topic:

Sunday column 19 Aug 2012: Science and Politics of Kidney Disease in Sri Lanka

Sunday column 26 Aug 2012: Watch out! Everybody Lives Downstream…