Crying Wolf in the Global Village? Managing Disaster Early Warnings in the Age of Social Media

Participants of SHER (Science, Health, Environment & Risk) Communication - Role of S&T Communication in Disaster Management and Community Preparedness held in Jakarta, Indonesia, on 8-9 Dec 2015

Participants of SHER (Science, Health, Environment & Risk) Communication – Role of S&T Communication in Disaster Management and Community Preparedness held in Jakarta, Indonesia, on 8-9 Dec 2015

On 8 – 9 December 2015, I attended and spoke at the Asian Regional Workshop on “SHER (Science, Health, Environment & Risk) Communication: Role of S&T Communication in Disaster Management and Community Preparedness” held in Jakarta, Indonesia.

It was organised by the Association of Academies and Societies of Sciences in Asia (AASSA) in collaboration with the Indonesian Academy of Sciences (AIPI), Korean Academy of Science and Technology (KAST) and the Agency for Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) in Indonesia.

The workshop brought together around 25 participants, most of them scientists researching or engaged in publication communication of science, technology and health related topics. I was one of two journalists in that gathering, having been nominated by the National Academy of Sciences of Sri Lanka (NAASL).

I drew on over 25 years of journalistic and science communication experience, during which time I have worked with disaster managers and researchers, and also co-edited a book, Communicating Disasters: An Asian Regional Handbook (2007).

Nalaka Gunawardene speaking at Science, Health, Environment & Risk Communication Asian regional workshop held in Jakarta, Indonesia, 8-9 Dec 2015

Nalaka Gunawardene speaking at Science, Health, Environment & Risk Communication Asian regional workshop held in Jakarta, Indonesia, 8-9 Dec 2015

The challenge in disaster early warnings is to make the best possible decisions quickly using imperfect information. With lives and livelihoods at stake, there is much pressure to get it right. But one can’t be timely and perfectly accurate at the same time.

We have come a long way since the devastating Boxing Day tsunami of December 2004 caught Indian Ocean countries by surprise. Many of the over 230,000 people killed that day could have been saved by timely coastal evacuations.

The good news is that advances in science and communications technology, greater international cooperation, and revamped national systems have vastly improved tsunami early warnings during the past decade. However, some critical gaps and challenges remain.

The Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System (IOTWS) was set up in 2005 under UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission. Over USD 400 million has been invested in state of the art equipment for rapid detection and assessment. However, the system’s overall effectiveness is limited by poor local infrastructure and lack of preparedness. Some countries also lack efficient decision-making for issuing national level warnings based on regionally provided rapid assessments.

Warnings must reach communities at risk early enough for action. False warnings can cause major economic losses and reduce compliance with future evacuation orders. Only governments can balance these factors. It is important that there be clearer protocols within governments to consider the best available information and make the necessary decisions quickly.

Now, the proliferation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) is making this delicate balance even more difficult. To remain effective in the always-connected and chattering Global Village, disaster managers have to rethink their engagement strategies.

Controlled release of information is no longer an option for governments. In the age of 24/7 news channels and social media, many people will learn of breaking disasters independently of official sources. Some social media users will also express their views instantly – and not always accurately.

How can this multiplicity of information sources and peddlers be harnessed in the best public interest? What are the policy options for governments, and responsibilities for technical experts? How to nurture public trust, the ‘lubricant’ that helps move the wheels of law and order – as well as public safety – in the right direction?

As a case study, I looked at what happened on 11 April 2012, when an 8.6-magnitude quake occurred beneath the ocean floor southwest of Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Several Asian countries issued quick warnings and some also ordered coastal evacuations. For example, Thai authorities shut down the Phuket International Airport, while Chennai port in southern India was closed for a few hours. In Sri Lanka, panic and chaos ensued.

In the end, the quake did not generate a tsunami (not all such quakes do) – but it highlighted weaknesses in the covering the ‘last mile’ in disseminating early warnings clearly and efficiently.

Speakers on ‘ICT Applications for Disaster Prevention and Treatment’ in Jakarta, Indonesia, 8-9 Dec 2015

Speakers on ‘ICT Applications for Disaster Prevention and Treatment’ in Jakarta, Indonesia, 8-9 Dec 2015

See also: Nurturing Public Trust in Times of Crisis: Reflections on April 11 Tsunami Warning. Groundviews.org 26 April 2012

I concluded: Unless governments communicate in a timely and authoritative manner during crises, that vacuum will be filled by multiple voices. Some of these may be speculative, or mischievously false, causing confusion and panic.

My full PowerPoint:

 

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #64: අවුරුදු සුනාමිය 2: ඉතිං ඊට පස්සෙ?

In this week’s Ravaya Sunday column (in Sinhala) appearing on 29 April 2012, I reflect on the Indian Ocean undersea quake on 11 April 2012, and the tsunami watch that followed.

Taking Sri Lanka as the example, I raise some basic concerns that go beyond the individual incident, and address fundamentals of disaster early warning and information management in the Internet age.

I ask: Was the tsunami warning and coastal evacuation on April 11 justified in Sri Lanka? I argue that this needs careful, dispassionate analysis in the coming weeks. ‘Better safe than sorry’ might work the first few times, but let us remember the cry-wolf syndrome. False alarms and evacuation orders can reduce public trust and cooperation over time.

I have covered similar ground in an English op ed essay just published on Groundviews.org: Nurturing Public Trust in Times of Crisis: Reflections on April 11 Tsunami Warning

Map showing epicentre of undersea quake in Indian Ocean on 11 April 2012 - courtesy Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre & US Geological Survey

“පිටසක්වලින් ආ අවුරුදු සුනාමිය” මැයෙන් කොලමක් මා ලිව්වේ හරියට ම වසරකට පෙර, 2011 අපේ‍්‍රල් 24දා. ඒ 2011 අපේ‍්‍රල් 15 වනදා මෙරට ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවක් වගකීම් විරහිතව කළ සජීව විකාශයක් නිසා හට ගත් මහජන භීතිය හා එයට පසුබිම් වූ කරුණු විග‍්‍රහ කරමින්.

2012 අපේ‍්‍රල් 11 වනදාත් ශ‍්‍රී ලංකාවේ වෙරළබඩ ප‍්‍රදේශ බොහොමයක සුනාමි අනතුරක සේයාව මතු වීම නිසා කලබල තත්ත්වයක් හටගත්තා. මෙය ආවේ පිටසක්වලින් නෙවෙයි. ඉන්දියානු සාගරයේ පතුලෙන්. හරියටම කිවහොත් ඉන්දුනීසියාවේ බන්ඩා අචි නගරයට කිමි 440ක් නිරිතදිගින් සාගරයේ කිමි 33ක් යටින්. එදින ශ‍්‍රී ලංකා වේලාවෙන් පස්වරු 2.08ට භූකම්පන මානයේ 8.6ක් සටහන් කළ ප‍්‍රබල භූමිකම්පාවක් හට ගත්තා.

එය සැර බාල වූ භූචලනයක් ලෙස අපේ රටේද විවිධ තැන්වලට දැනුනා. එයින් විනාඩි 6ක් ගත වූ පසු අමෙරිකාවේ හවායි දුපත්වල පිහිටි, අමෙරිකානු රාජ්‍ය ආයතනයක් වන පැසිෆික් සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවිමේ කේන්ද්‍රය (PTWC) විසින් ඒ ගැන මුල් ම විද්‍යාත්මක තොරතුරු සන්නිවේදන සිය වෙබ් අඩවිය හරහා නිකුත් කළා. එයින් කියැවුණේ ඉන්දියානු සාගර සුනාමියක් හට ගැනිමේ යම් අවදානමක් ඇති බවත්, මේ කලාපයේ වෙරළබඩ රටවල් තව දුරටත් ආරක්ෂාකාරි පියවර ගැනිම සදහා සුදානමින් හා සීරුවෙන් සිටිය යුතු බවත්. මේ සීරුවෙන් සිටීම විද්‍යාඥයන් Tsunami Watch ලෙස ලෙස නම් කරනවා.

මුහුදු පතුලේ ප‍්‍රබල භූචලනයක් සිදු වූ මොහොතේ පටන් PTWC විද්‍යාඥයන් ඉතා කඩිසර ලෙසින් මුහුදු රළ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිත්වය හා සාගර තරංග ගැන දුර සිට මැනීම කරනවා. මේ සදහා ස්වයංක‍්‍රීය ලෙස තොරතුරු සැපයීමේ හැකියාව ඇති සංවේදී උපකරණ ඉන්දියානු සාගරයේ බොහෝ ස්ථානවල පිහිටුවා තිබෙනවා. සමහරක් සාගරයේ පාවෙමින් චන්ද්‍රිකා හරහා තොරතුරු එවේලේ ම විකාශය කරන අතර තවත් ඒවා වෙරළබඩ යම් ස්ථානවල සවි කර තිබෙනවා.

මේවායින් එසැනින් ලැබෙන අළුත් ම විද්‍යාත්මක දත්තල එම සාගර ප‍්‍රදේශයේ ඓතිහාසික සුනාමි ඇති වීමේ ප‍්‍රවණතා ද සැලකිල්ලට ගෙන සුනාමියක් හට ගැනීමේ හැකියාව ගැන PTWC විද්‍යාඥයින් ඉක්මන් තක්සේරුවක් කරනවා.

අපේ‍්‍රල් 11 වනදා ඉන්දියානු සාගරයේ මුල් භූචලනයෙන් හා ඉනික්බිති හටගත් පසු කම්පන (aftershocks) නිසා සුළු මට්ටමේ සාගර තරංග බලපෑමක් හට ගත්තත් එය සුනාමියක් බවට පත් වූයේ නැහැ. මේ නිසා ශ‍්‍රි ලංකා වේලාවෙන් පස්වරු 2.15ට හදුන්වා දෙනු ලැබූ සුනාමි සීරුවෙන් සිටීම සවස 6.06ට PTWC විසින් නතර කරනු ලැබුවා.

මේ පැය හතරකට ආසන්න කාලය තුළ ඔවුන් විද්‍යාත්මක නිවේදන (Indian Ocean Tsunami Watch Bulletins) හයක් නිකුත් කළා. එම විග‍්‍රහයන් සැළකිල්ලට ගෙන ජාතික මට්ටමෙන් තීරණ ගැනීම හා ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වීම එක් එක් රටවලට භාර වගකීමක්. අපේ‍්‍රල් 11 වනදා එය අදාළ රටවල විවිධ ආකාරයෙන් සිදු වුණා. මුල් භූ චලනයෙන් විනාඩි 6ක් ඇතුළත එයට සමීපතම රටවන ඉන්දුනීසියාව අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් නිකුත් කළ අතර, ඉන්දියාව විනාඩි 8කින් සිය නැගෙනහිර වෙරළට එබදු අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් නිකුත් කළා.

ශ‍්‍රි ලංකාවේ ජාතික මට්ටමේ නිල අනතුරු ඇගවීම නිකුත් කරනු ලැබුවේ එදින පස්වරු 3.30ට පමණයි. ශ‍්‍රි ලංකාවේ නැගෙනහිර හා දකුණු වෙරළබඩ ප‍්‍රදේශවල ජිවත් වන ජනතාව හැකි ඉක්මණින් ආරක්ෂිත ස්ථාන කරා ඉවත්වන ලෙස අවවාද කරනු ලැබේ, එයින් කියැවුණා.

සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් දේශීය වශයෙන් නිකුත් කිරිම ඉතා වගකිම් සහගත තීරණයක්. එහිදී විද්‍යාත්මක සාධක මත පදනම් වී, මහජන ආරක්ෂාව ද සැලකිල්ලට ගෙන හැකි තාක් ඉක්මනින් ක‍්‍රියා කළ යුතු වනවා. එහෙත් හැමදෙයක් ම මුළුමනින් තහවුරු කර ගන්නා තුරු බලා සිටිය හොත් කඩිනමින් පැමිණෙන සුනාමි වැනි ආපදාවකදී අනතුරු ඇගවීම ප‍්‍රමාද වැඩි විය හැකියි.

අවම වශයෙන් වෙරළ ප‍්‍රදේශවලින් රට තුළට යාමට පැය බාගයකට කාලයක් තිබිය යුතුයි. මේ නිසා තමන්ට තිබෙන අළුත් ම එහෙත් අසම්පුර්ණ විද්‍යාත්මක තොරතුරු මත, රට ලෝකය ගැන තමන් සතු පුළුල් අවබෝධය ද යොදා ගනිමින් සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් නිකුත් කරනවා ද නැද්ද යන තීරණය ගන්නට අදාළ නිලධාරින්ට සිදු වනවා.

මාධ්‍ය, සිවිල්, සංවිධාන හා ආරක්ෂක හමුදාවලට කළ හැක්කේ එසේ නිල වශයෙන් ගන්නා තීරණයක් පතුරුවා හැරිම පමණයි. අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් නිකුත් කිරිමේ බලය තනිකර ම රටක මධ්‍යම රජයට පමණක් සීමා විය යුතුයි.

2004දී අපට තිබුනු ලොකු ම අඩුපාඩුව වූයේ ජාත්‍යන්තරව ලැබෙන සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් ගැන දේශීය වශයෙන් තීරණයක් ගැනීමට හා ඒ තීරණය හැකි ඉක්මණින් අදාළ ප‍්‍රදේශවල මහජනතාවට දැනුම් දීමට නොහැකි වීමයි. 2004 සුනාමියෙන් පසුව මේ මුලික අඩුපාඩු මග හරවා ගෙන ඇතත්, සුනාමි අනතුරක සේයාව මතු වූ විටෙක ආරක්ෂිත පියවර මනා සේ සම්බන්ධිකරණය වීම ගැන තවමත් විසදා නොගත් ගැටළු තිබෙන බව අපේ‍්‍රල් 11දා අත්දැකීමෙන් පෙනී ගියා.

සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීමකදී හැසිරිය යුතු ආකාරය ගැන බොහෝ වෙරළබඩ ප‍්‍රදේශවල ජනතාව මේ වන විට දැනුවත් කර තිබෙනවා. මෙයට ආපදා කළමණාකරන මධ්‍යස්ථානය (DMC) මෙන් ම සර්වෝදය හා රතු කුරුස සංගමය වැනි ස්වේච්චා ආයතන ද මුල් වුණා. එහෙත් සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීමෙන් පසු බටහිර, දකුණු හා නැගෙනහිර වෙරළ ප‍්‍රදේශවල ඇති වුණු විකෂිප්ත තත්ත්වය හා සංත‍්‍රාසය (panic) ගැන පසු විපරමක් කළ යුතුයි.

2004 – 2011 කාලය තුළ සන්නිවේදන තාක්ෂණය බොහෝ සේ දියුණු වී තිබෙනවා. 2004දී මිලියන් 2ක් පමණ වූ මෙරට ජංගම දුරකථන සංඛ්‍යාව 2011 අග වන විට මිලියන් 18 ඉක්මවා ගියා. මෙරට ජනගහනයෙන් සියයට 15 – 20ක් දෙනා නිතිපතා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතා කරනවා. මේ නිසා සම්ප‍්‍රදායික රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් මාධ්‍යවලට අමතරව ජංගම දුරකථන හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් හරහා ද හදිසි අවස්ථාවල තොරතුරු ගලා යනවා.

හදිසි අවස්ථාවක ජංගම දුරකථන ජාල ධාරිතාව ඉක්මවා ගොස් තදබදයක් හට ගැනීම සුලබයි. ඉන්ටර්නෙට් සේවා අඩාල නොවී ක‍්‍රියාත්මක වූ නිසා Facebook හා Twitter වැනි වෙබ් මාධ්‍යවල සැලකිය යුතු තොරතුරු හුවාමරුවක් සිදු වුණා. ඒ අතර ඇතැම් රේඩියෝ හා ටෙලිවිෂන් නාලිකාවල නිවේදකයන් ආවේගශීලිව ජනතාව බියපත් කිරිමට හා කලබල වැඩි කිරිමට දායක වූ බවත් කිව යුතුයි.

මේ ගැන විග‍්‍රහයක් කරමින් මෙරට හිටපු විදුලි සංදේශ නියාමකවරයකු හා සන්නිවේදන විශේෂඥයකු වන මහාචාර්ය රොහාන් සමරජීව කීවේ: “හදිසි අවස්ථාවක තොරතුරු හුවමාරු වීමේදි නිල මුලාශ‍්‍රවලට හෝ ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ (විද්‍යුත්) මාධ්‍යවලට සීමා වූ යුගය හමාරයි. ඉන්ටර්නෙට් ප‍්‍රචලිත වීම හා ජනප‍්‍රියවිමත් සමග ලෝකයේ නොයෙක් තැන්වලින් මතු වන අළුත් ම තොරතුරු හා විග‍්‍රහයන් එසැනින්ම ලබා ගැනිමේ හැකියාව අපේ සමාජයේ දැන් විවෘත වී තිබෙනවා. මේ නව සන්නිවේදන යථාර්ථය ආපදා අනතුරු ඇගවීම් නිකුත් කිරිමේ වගකීම හා නිල බලය ඇති රාජ්‍ය ආයතන හා නිලධාරින් සැලකිල්ලට ගත යුතුයි.”

නිල රාජ්‍ය මුලාශ‍්‍ර මුලික අනතුරු ඇගවීමෙන් පසු දිගින් දිගට අළුත් තොරතුරු සැපයීමට පෙරට ආවේ නැහැ. මෙබදු අවස්ථාවක රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරින් තනි නාලිකාවකට දෙකකට සම්බන්ධ වීම සෑහෙන්නේ නැහැ. එමෙන්ම ජේ්‍යෂ්ඨ නිලධාරින් මාධ්‍ය හරහා ජනතාවට තොරතුරු දීම ඉතා වැදගත්. ජන මනස කැළඹි ඇති විට යම් තරමකට හෝ ඔවුන්ට අස්වැසිල්ලක් ලැබෙන්නේ එවිටයි.

භූ චලනයෙන් කෙටි වේලාවක් ඇතුළත දෙස් විදෙස් ජනමාධ්‍ය සියල්ලට ම විවෘත වෙමින් බහුවිධ මාධ්‍ය හරහා මිලියන් 235කට අධික සිය රටවැසියන්ට සම්බන්ධ වූ ඉන්දුනීසියානු ජනාධිපති සුසිලෝ යොදියෝනෝ ඒ කාර්යය ඉතා දක්ෂ ලෙස ඉටු කළ බව ටයිම් සගරාවේ ශ‍්‍රී ලංකා වාර්තාකරු අමන්ත පෙරේරා පෙන්වා දෙනවා.

“තනතුරෙන් උසස් රාජ්‍ය නිලධාරියකු හෝ නායකයකු එදින අපේ රටේ දේශීය සන්නිවේදනයට මැදිහත් නොවීම කණගාටුවට කරුණක්. සජීව විද්‍යුත් මාධ්‍ය වාර්තාකරණයේදී හදිසි අවස්ථාව පහව යන තුරු දිගින් දිගට ම ජනමාධ්‍ය හරහා ජනතාවට තොරතුරු දීම හා සන්සුන් කිරිම අත්‍යවශ්‍යයි. මේ සදහා ඇති තරම් ලක් රජයෙන් නිල ප‍්‍රකාශකයන් සොයා ගන්නට මාධ්‍යවලට නොහැකි වුණා,” අමන්ත කියනවා.

අපේ‍්‍රල් 11දා සුනාමි අනතුරු ඇගවීම් නිකුත් කිරිම හා එයින් පසු සිදු වූ සමස්ත ක‍්‍රියාදාමය ගැන මැදහත් විමර්ශනයක් කළ යුතුයි. එදා බලය ලත් නිලධාරින් ක‍්‍රියා කරන්නට ඇත්තේ පරිස්සම හා ආරක්ෂාව පැත්තට වැඩි බරක් තබමින් විය යුතුයි. එය එදින තත්ත්වය බේරා ගන්නට උදවු වුණත්, මෙබදු අනතුරු ඇගවීම් විටින් විට නිකුත් කර සුනාමි නොඑන විට අනතුරු ඇගවීම් පිළිබද මහජන විශ්වාසය ටිකෙන් ටික අඩු වීමේ අවදානමක් තිබෙනවා. False Alarms නමින් හැදින්වෙන මේ තත්ත්වය දිගු කාලීනව ආපදා කළමණාකරනයට අහිතකරයි.

“කොටියා ආවා” යයි නිතර නිතර කෑගසමින් විහිලූ කරන්නට පුරුදුව සිටි තරුණයාගේ කථාව අප දන්නවා. ඇත්තට ම කොටියකු ආ විට ඔහුගේ අනතුරු ඇගවීම කිසිවකු විශ්වාස කළේ නැහැ!

බංගලාදේශය, පිලිපීනය, තායිලන්තය වැනි අපේ කලාපයේ රටවල මෑත වසරවල අත්දැකීම්වලින් පෙනී යන්නේ අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස කලබල වී අනතුරු ඇගවීමක් නිකුත් කොටල එනවා යැයි කී සුනාමි නොපැමිණි විට අදාල නිල ආයතන ගැන ජන මනසේ ඇති විශ්වාසය පළුදු වන බවයි. මේ නිසා අපේ‍්‍රල් 11 වනදා ප‍්‍රවේශම්කාරිවීම ගැන උදම් අනන අතරේ මේ දිගු කාලීන විපාකය ගැන සීරුවෙන් සිතා කටයුතු කළ යුතු බව මහාචාර්ය සමරජීව අවධාරණය කරනවා.

එසේ ම සුනාමි සන්නිවේදනයේදී වචන හරඹයේ සිදුවන ව්‍යාකුලතා වළක්වා ගැනිමට සරල වර්ණ සංකේත ක‍්‍රමයක් යොදා ගත හැකියි. එහිදී සුනාමි නොමැති තත්ත්වය කොළ පාටිනුත්, සුනාමියක් සිදුවීමේ සේයාව හෝ අවදානම (Watch) තැඹිලි පාටිනුත්, නියත වශයෙන්ම සුනාමියක් මහ එන බව දත් විට (Warning) රතු පාටිනුත් නියෝජනය කළ හැකියි. මෙය රථවාහන සංඥා ක‍්‍රමයට සමාන නිසා මාධ්‍යවේදීන් හෝ පොදු මහජනතාව හෝ වරදවා වටහා ගන්නට ඉඩක් නැහැ.

Public Trust in Times of Crisis: Reflections on April 11 Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning

Entrance to Pacific Tsunami Museum in Hilo, Hawaii, photo by Nalaka Gunawardene, Jan 2007

Five years ago, on a visit to the Pacific Tsunami Museum in Hilo, Hawaii, I played an interesting simulation game: setting off an undersea earthquake and deciding whether or not to issue a tsunami warning to the many countries in and around the Pacific.

The volunteer-run museum, based in ‘the tsunami capital of the world’, engages visitors on the science, history and sociology of tsunamis. The exhibits are mostly mechanical or use basic electronic displays, but the messages are carefully thought out.

The game allowed me to imagine being Director of the Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre (PTWC), a US government scientific facility in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, where geophysicists monitor seismic activity round the clock. When the magnitude exceeds 7.5, its epicentre is located and a tsunami watch is set up. Then, combining the seismic, sea level and historical data, PTWC decides if it should be upped to a warning.

Tsunami simulation game - low tech, high lesson

The museum game allows players to choose one of three locations where an earthquake happens — Alaska, Chile or Japan — and also decide on its magnitude from 6.0 to 8.5 on the Richter Scale.

This is an instance where scientists must quickly process large volumes of information and add their own judgement to the mix. With rapid onset hazards like tsunamis, every second counts. Delays or inaction can be costly — but false alarms don’t come cheap either.

I played the game thrice, and erring on the side of caution, issued a local (Hawaiian) evacuation every time. If it were for real, that would have caused chaos and cost the islanders a lot of money.

In fact, those who make decisions on tsunami alerts or warnings have to take many factors into account – including safety, economic impact and even political fall-out.

After playing the simulation game, I can better appreciate the predicament government officials who shoulder this responsibility. They walk a tight rope, balancing short-term public safety and long term public trust in the entire early warning system.

This is how I open a new op ed essay that reflects on the Indian Ocean undersea quake on 11 April 2012, and the tsunami watch that followed.

Taking Sri Lanka as the example, but sometimes referring to how other Indian Ocean rim countries reacted to the same situation, I raise some basic concerns that go beyond this individual incident, and address fundamentals of disaster early warning and information management in the Internet age.

Another except:
“So was the tsunami warning and coastal evacuation on April 11 justified? This needs careful, dispassionate analysis in the coming weeks. ‘Better safe than sorry’ might work the first few times, but let us remember the cry-wolf syndrome. False alarms and evacuation orders can reduce public trust and cooperation over time.”

In particular, I focus on nurturing public trust — which I call the ‘lubricant’ that can help move the wheels of law and order, as well as public safety, in the right direction.

Read full essay on Groundviews.org:
Nurturing Public Trust in Times of Crisis: Reflections on April 11 Tsunami Warning