Echelon May 2015 column: Black Swans, White Lies and the Rise of ‘Info-Doers’

Text of my column written for Echelon monthly business magazine, Sri Lanka, May 2015 issue

Black Swans, White Lies and the Rise of ‘Info-Doers’

By Nalaka Gunawardene

They are rare, but whey they arrive, bring Bad News...

They are rare, but whey they arrive, bring Bad News…

The Global Village is a pretty noisy place. In today’s networked society, information can spread at the speed of light. Fabrications, half-truths and myriad interpretations compete with evidence-based analyses and official positions. Trust is being redefined.

How can the formal structures of power – whether government, academic, military or corporate – engage in public communication in effective ways? Should they ignore what I call the Global Cacophony and limit themselves to formal statements made at their own bureaucratic pace?

Consider a recent scenario. A controversy erupts over how the Central Bank of Sri Lanka handles the latest Treasury Bond issue, but the government takes several days to respond. The Prime Minister makes a detailed statement in Parliament on March 17, which he opens saying: “I felt my first statement with regard to the so-called controversy over Treasury bonds should be made to this House.”

He offers a characteristically good analysis. But in the meantime, many speculations had circulated, some questioning the new administration’s commitment to transparency and accountability. Political detractors had had a field day.

Could it have been handled differently? Should government spokespersons have turned defensive or combative? Is maintaining a stoic silence until full clarity emerges realistic when governments no longer have a monopoly over information dissemination? What then happens to public trust in governments?

Black Swans

Some information managers still invoke an old adage: this too shall pass. The digitally empowered citizens may descend on an issue with gusto, they contend, but attention spans are short. ‘Smart-mobs’ tend to move on to the next breaking topic within days if not hours…

Nassim Nicholas Taleb - image from Wikipedia

Nassim Nicholas Taleb – image from Wikipedia

But how reliable is that as a strategy? And what happens when, once in a while, ‘Black Swan events’ occur disrupting everything?

It was the Lebanese-American scholar, statistician and risk analyst Nassim Nicholas Taleb who proposed the theory of Black Swan events. He used it as a metaphor to describe an event that comes as a surprise, has a major effect, and is often inappropriately rationalised afterwards with the benefit of hindsight.

The idea, first introduced in his 2001 book Fooled By Randomness, was initially limited to financial events. In a follow-up book The Black Swan (2007), he extended it to other events as well.

According to Taleb, almost all major scientific discoveries, historical events and artistic accomplishments are “Black Swans” — undirected and unpredicted. Examples include the rise of the Internet, the personal computer, World War I, dissolution of the Soviet Union and the attack on the World Trade Centre in New York on 11 September 2001.

The nexus between Black Swan events and information management has been explored in depth in a 2009 study titled ‘The Skyful of Lies & Black Swans: The new tyranny of shifting information power in crises’ that came out from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University.

Nik Gowing at World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2012 - image via Wikipedia

Nik Gowing at World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2012 – image via Wikipedia

I recently had a fascinating conversation with its author Nik Gowing, a senior British television journalist with 40 years of experience in news and current affairs. Before he stepped down in 2014, he was main anchor for much of BBC’s coverage of major international events including Kosovo in 1999, the Iraq war in 2003, the global financial meltdown of 2007 and Mumbai attack in 2008. On 9/11, he was on air for six hours leading the coverage.

“In a moment of major and unexpected crisis, the institutions of power – whether political, governmental, military or corporate – face a new, acute vulnerability of both their influence and effectiveness,” Nik says summing up the study’s findings.

He analysed the new fragility and brittleness of those institutions, and the profound impact upon them from a fast proliferating and almost ubiquitous breed of what he calls ‘information doers’.

Info-doers

‘Info-doer’ seems more inclusive than the contested term ‘citizen journalist’. Such ‘info-doers’ are empowered by cheap, lightweight, go-anywhere technologies. That trend, already evident in 2009, has gained further momentum since.

“They have an unprecedented mass ability to bear witness. The result is a matrix of real-time information flows that challenges the inadequacy of the structures of power to respond both with effective impact and in a timely way,” the study says.

Nik adds: “Increasingly routinely, a cheap, ‘go-anywhere’ camera or mobile phone challenges the credibility of the massive human and financial resources of a government or corporation in an acute crisis. The long-held conventional wisdom of a gulf in time and quality between the news that signals an event and the whole truth eventually emerging is fast being eliminated.”

He describes how, in the most remote and hostile locations of the globe, hundreds of millions of electronic eyes and ears are creating a capacity for scrutiny and new demands for accountability. “It is way beyond the assumed power and influence of the traditional media. This global electronic reach catches institutions unaware and surprises with what it reveals.”

The phenomenon is globalised. Info-doers, with a range of motivations, are everywhere from the financial capitals like London and New York to crisis locations in Iraq, China’s Tibet plateau, Burma, the flooded heart of New Orleans or the mountains of Afghanistan. Censorship and crackdowns can’t stop them.

How to respond?

So what is to be done?

The instinct of many authorities is still to deny inconvenient truths and blame “the damn media” in times of crisis. This no longer works (if it ever did).

“Too often, the knee-jerk institutional response continues to be one of denial as if this new broader, fragmented, redefined media landscape does not exist. Yet within minutes the new, almost infinite media dynamic of images, video, texts and social media mean the public rapidly has vivid, accurate impressions of what is unravelling.”

For example, during Burma’s ill-fated Saffron Revolution of September 2007, video footage and images of protests rapidly spread online and through mainstream broadcast media. Most had been captured using mobile phones and sent out through internet cafes despite attempts to block their flow. The junta later dismissed such coverage as a “skyful of lies”, convincing no one.

The immediate policy challenge is to enter the information space with self-confidence and assertiveness as the media do, however incomplete the official understanding of the enormity of what is unfolding.

After a major crisis hits, both the mainstream media and policy makers face what Nik Gowing defines as the F3 dilemma. The F3 options are:

  • Should they be the first to enter the info-space?
  • How fast should they do it?
  • But how flawed might their remarks and first positions turn out to be in ways that could undermine public perceptions and institutional credibility?

Using many examples, the study has analysed the typical institutional response: to hesitate and lose initiative. This is because wielders of power still don’t appreciate dramatic changes in the real-time new media environment. Nik has included a few enlightened policy responses – “too few to suggest any sign of a fundamental shift in understanding and attitudes”.

The study ends with recommendations for how various institutions of political and corporate power can respond to the new challenges.

“The new real-time media realities are harsh. But once understood, embraced and acted upon, the proposed solutions are compelling. They represent a path to institutional effectiveness and credibility when these are currently lacking.”

Full study is online at: http://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/publication/skyful-lies-black-swans

Beware of Black Swans: but can we really prepare for them?

Beware of Black Swans: but can we really prepare for them?

Science writer Nalaka Gunawardene is on Twitter @NalakaG and blogs at http://nalakagunawardene.com.

සිවුමංසල කොලූගැටයා #174: සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ඇවිලෙන ගින්නට පිදුරු දැමීමක් ද?

In this week’s Ravaya column (in Sinhala), I discuss the role of mainstream and social media in the immediate aftermath of serious communal riots in Aluthgama, Beruwala and Dharga Town in Sri Lanka on 15 June 2014.

For over 48 hours, there was little coverage of the incidents in newspapers, or on radio and TV. This gap was partly filled by social media and international media reports – but only to the extent they have outreach in the island. Those who rely on local newspapers, radio and TV had to settle for ‘radio silence’ while media gatekeepers hesitated and held back.

I covered the same ground in my English column last week:
When Worlds Collide #112: Social Media ‘Candles’ for Mainstream Media Blackouts

Only candid voices in Sri Lanka's mainstream media these days come from political cartoonists!

Only candid voices in Sri Lanka’s mainstream media these days come from political cartoonists!

‘‘කොහොමද වැඬේ? අන්න ඔහේලා ආවඩපු සමාජ මාධ්‍යකාරයෝ එකතු වෙලා රට ගිනි තියනවා!’’

අළුත්ගම හා බේරුවල ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය ඇති වී පැය 48ක් ඉක්ම යන්නට කලින් මා අමතා මෙසේ කීවේ සරසවියක ඇදුරුකමක් දරන උගතෙක්.

ඔහුගේ ‘‘චෝදනාව’’ වූයේ අළුත්ගම ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය පිළිබඳ තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප ට්විටර් (Twitter) හා ෆේස්බුක් (Facebook) වැනි ප‍්‍රකට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා අධිවේගීව සංසරණය වන බවත්, ඒ හරහා ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩ ක‍්‍රියා වෙනත් ප‍්‍රදේශවලටත් පැතිර යා හැකි බවත්. අඩු වැඩි වශයෙන් මේ ආකාරයේ ප‍්‍රකාශ තවත් බොහෝ දෙනකු මෑත දිනවල කරනු මා ඇසුවා.

අළුත්ගම ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය සිදු වූ ජුනි 15 ඉරිදා සිට පැය 24 – 48ක් ගත වන තුරු ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ බොහෝ මාධ්‍ය එය වාර්තා කළේ ඉතා අඩුවෙන් හා සුපරීක්‍ෂාවෙන්. එයට හේතුව විය හැක්කේ එම පුවත සැලවීමෙන් වෙනත් ප‍්‍රදේශවල ද කලහකාරි ක‍්‍රියා ඇති වේය යන සැකයයි.

මීට අමතරව රජයෙන් නිල වශයෙන් හෝ නිල නොවන මට්ටමින් මාධ්‍යවලට බලපෑම් එල්ල වූවා ද යන්න දන්නේ අදාල මාධ්‍ය කතුවරුන් හා හිමිකරුවන් පමණයි. එබන්දක් වූවා යයි කිසිවකුත් ප‍්‍රසිද්ධියේ කියා නැති නිසා ඒ ගැන අනුමාන කිරීමේ තේරුමක් නැහැ.

පුවත් පැතිර යා හැකි මාර්ග ගණනාවක් අද මෙරට තිබෙනවා. ජංගම දුරකථන ව්‍යාප්තිය නිසා බහුතරයක් ලෙහෙසියෙන් දුරකථනයක් භාවිතා කිරීමේ හැකියාව ලබා තිබෙනවා. මිලියන් 20.5ක් වන ලාංකික ජනගහනයට ජංගම දුරකථන ගිනුම් මිලියන 20ක් පමණ හා ස්ථාවර දුරකථන මිලියන් 2.7ක් පමණ තිබෙනවා.

මෑත වසරවල ඇමතුම් ගාස්තු පහළ වැටීම නිසාත්, SMS ඊටත් වඩා අඩු වියදම් සහිත වීම නිසාත් අද පෙරට වඩා දුරකථන හරහා ලාංකිකයන් සන්නිවේදනය කරනවා. රටේ එක් තැනෙක ප‍්‍රබල සිදුවීමක් ඇති වූ විට මාධ්‍ය එය වාර්තා කළත්, නැතත් දුරකථන හරහා පෞද්ගලික මට්ටමින් පැතිර යාමේ ඉඩ පෙර කවරදාකටත් වඩා අද ඉහළයි.

එබඳු පෞද්ගලික තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවේදී අතිශයෝක්ති, විකෘති වීම් හා ප‍්‍රබන්ධකරණය ද එයට එක් වීමේ ඉඩ තිබෙනවා. ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය නිසි වේලාවට රටට ම තොරතුරු බෙදා දුන්නා නම් දුරකථන හා නව මාධ්‍ය හරහා යම් සන්නිවේදන සිදු වීමෙන් ඇතිවන සමාජ හානිය සමනය කර ගත හැකිව තිබුණා.

Awantha Artigala cartoon on media manufacturing dead ropes in Lanka

Awantha Artigala cartoon on media manufacturing dead ropes in Lanka

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තවමත් අළුත් නිසා ඒවායේ ක‍්‍රියාකාරිත්වය හා සමාජීය බලපෑම ගැන අප සැවොම තවමත් අත්දැකීම් ලබමින් සිටිනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ගැන ඉක්මන් නිගමනවලට එළඹෙන බොහෝ දෙනකු ඒ ගැන ගවේෂණාත්මක අධ්‍යයනයකින් නොව මතු පිටින් පැතිකඩ කිහිපයක් කඩිමුඩියේ දැකීමෙන් එසේ කරන අයයි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යනු බහුවිධ හා සංකීර්ණ සංසිද්ධියක්. එය හරි කලබලකාරී වේදිකාවක් නැතහොත් විවෘත පොළක් වගෙයි. අලෙවි කිරීමක් නැති වුවත් ඝෝෂාකාරී හා කලබලකාරී පොලක ඇති ගතිසොබාවලට සමාන්තර බවක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය තුළ හමු වනවා.

එසේම සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අන්තර්ගතයත් අතිශයින් විවිධාකාරයි. එහි සංසරණය වන හා බෙදා ගන්නා සියල්ල ග‍්‍රහණය කරන්නට කිසිවකුටත් නොහැකියි.

ෆේස්බුක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය ජාලයේ පමණක් ගිනුම් හිමියන් මිලියන් එක හමාරකට වඩා මෙරට සිටිනවා. එහෙත් එහි බොහොමයක් සාමීචි සංවෘතව සිදු වන නිසා මිතුරු ඇරැයුම් ලත් අයට පමණක් ඒවා ග‍්‍රහණය වනවා.

නමුත් ට්විටර් වේදිකාව කාටත් විවෘතයි. මෙරට ට්විටර් භාවිත කරන සංඛ්‍යාව පිළිබඳ නිශ්චිත සංඛ්‍යාලේඛණ නැහැ. 2013 මැදදී එක් ඇස්තමේන්තුවක් වූයේ 14,000ක් පමණ බවයි. මේ වන විට එය විසි දහසකට වැඩි විය හැකියි. එක ට්විටර් පණිවුඩයක් (ට්වීට් එකක්) අකුරු හෝ වෙනත් සංකේත 140කට සීමා වනවා. එබඳු සීමාවක් තුළ වුව ද සූක්‍ෂම හා ව්‍යක්ත ලෙස පණිවුඩ දිය හැකියි.

ට්විටර් මාධ්‍යයේ ගිනුමක් විවෘත කළ විට තමන් කැමති අන් ට්විටර් භාවිත කරන්නන් කියන කරන දේ ස්වයංකී‍්‍රයව නිරික්සිය හැකියි (follow). ක‍්‍රීඩා, චිත‍්‍රපට හෝ වෙනත් ක්‍ෂෙත‍්‍රවල නමක් දිනා ගත් ප‍්‍රකට පුද්ගලයන් හා දේශපාලන නායකයන්ගේ ට්විටර් අනුගාමික සංඛ්‍යාව වැඩියි.

උදා: 2014 ජුනි 22දා වන විට මහේල ජයවර්ධනට අනුගාමිකයන් 110,000ක්, කුමාර් සංගක්කාරට ලක්‍සයක් හා ජනාධිපති මහින්ද රාජපක්‍ෂගේ නිල ට්විටර් ගිනුමට අනුගාමිකයන් 38,000ක් පමණ සිටියා. අනුගාමිකයන් වැඩි දෙනකු සිටින අයකු කියන දේ වඩා ඉක්මනින් ප‍්‍රතිරාවය වී පැතිරෙන්නට ඉඩකඩ වැඩියි.

සමාජ මාධ්‍යවලට ආවේණික වූ විශ්වාසය තක්සේරු වීමේ ක‍්‍රමවේද තිබෙනවා. ඒ අනුව අනුගාමික සංඛ්‍යාව පමණක් නොව ට්වීට් පණිවුඩ ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කැරෙන වාර ගණන හා ආකර්ෂණය වන පාඨක අවධානය ආදී සාධක සැළකිල්ලට ගෙන කෙනකුගේ ට්විටර් බලපෑම (influence) ස්වයංකී‍්‍රයව ගණන් බැලෙනවා. මහජන විශ්වාසය (trust) යන්න හැමට ම දිනා ගත හැකි ගුණයක් නොවෙයි.

අළුත්ගම සිදුවීම්වලට රජයේ නිල ප‍්‍රතිචාරය වූයේ එවකට බොලීවියාවේ සංචාරයක යෙදී සිටි ජනාධිපතිවරයා සිය ට්විටර් ගිනුමෙන් නිකුත් කළ කෙටි පණිවුඩ කිහිපයක්. ජනාධිපතිවරයා (හෝ ඔහුගේ කාර්ය මණ්ඩලය) ජුනි 15 වනදා ඉංග‍්‍රීසියෙන් ට්විට් පණිවුඩ 2ක් ද, ජුනි 16 වනදා සිංහලෙන් ට්වීට් 2ක් හා දෙමළෙන් ට්වීට් 3ක් ද නිකුත් කළා.

සිංහල ට්වීට් පණිවුඩ වූයේ ‘‘නීතිය සිය අතට ගැනීමට රජය විසින් කිසිවකුට ඉඩ නොතබන අතර, මා සියළු දෙනාගෙන් සංයමයෙන් යුතුව කටයුතු කරන මෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටිමි’’. දෙවැනි පණිවුඩය ‘‘අලූත්ගම සිද්ධියට සම්බන්ධ පුද්ගලයන් නීතිය ඉදිරියට පැමිණවීමට පරික්‍ෂණයක් පවත්වනු ලැබේ’’

මෙරට ජන ගහනයෙන් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිත කරන 20-25%ක ප‍්‍රමාණයට පමණක් ග‍්‍රහණය වන මේ පණිවුඩ එබඳු අවස්ථාවක රජයේ නිල ප‍්‍රතිචාරය ලෙස ප‍්‍රමාණවත් නොවූ බව මගේ අදහසයි. රටේ 75-85% ගෘහස්ථයන්ගේ හමුවන ටෙලිවිෂන් හා රේඩියෝ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ද කෙටියෙන් වුවත් සන්සුන්ව සිටීමේ ආයාචනයක් කළ හැකිව තිබුණා. මෙබඳු අවස්ථාවල ඉහළ මට්ටමේ, වගකිවයුතු කෙනකුගේ කට හඬින්ම පණිවුඩයක් ඇසීමට අද සමාජය පුරුදු වී සිටිනවා (ආපදාවක් වූ විට විෂය භාර අමාත්‍යවරයා ප‍්‍රකාශයක් කරන්නා සේ).

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හරහා ජුනි 16-17 දිනවල තොරතුරු හා ඡායාරූප ගලා ගියේ ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය ඒ ගැන මුනිවත රකිමින් සිටි පසුබිම තුළයි. මීට පරම්පරාවකට හෝ දෙකකට පෙර නම් ඕනෑකමින් පුවත් අන්ධකාරයක් (media blackout) ටික දිනකට හෝ පවත්වා ගැනීමට හැකි වුණා. මන්ද තැපෑල හැරුණ විට පෞද්ගලික මට්ටමින් තොරතුරු හුවමාරුවට අවශ්‍ය තරම් දුරකථන හා වෙනත් මාධ්‍ය නොතිබීම නිසා.

එහෙත් 21 වන සියවසේ ටෙලිවිෂන්, රේඩියෝ හා පුවත්පත් වෙතින් එවන් පුවත් අන්ධකාරයක් මතු වූ විට ජනතාව ජංගම දුරකථන හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙත යොමු වනවා.

Mainstream and citizen journalists in Sri Lanka contrasted by Gihan De Chickera of Daily Mirror

Mainstream and citizen journalists in Sri Lanka contrasted by Gihan De Chickera of Daily Mirror

First Post (India): 17 June 2014: Social media breaks Sri Lankan media’s shameful silence

ප‍්‍රමිතියක් සහිතව සමබරව පුවත් සන්නිවේදනයට පුහුණුව ලැබූ මාධ්‍යවේදීන් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ සිටියත් මේ විකල්ප සන්නිවේදනයට යොමු වන බොහෝ දෙනකුට එබන්දක් නැහැ. එනිසා තොරතුරු විකෘති වීමට ඉඩ වැඩියි. ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය අත්‍යවශ්‍යම වූ මොහොතක නිහඬවීමේ අවදානම මෙයයි.

අලූත්ගම සිදුවීම් ගැන වෙබ් අඩවි, ෆේස්බුක් හා ට්විටර් හරහා කම්පාවට පත් රටවැසියන් අදහස් දැක්වූවා. මෙය ඔවුන් අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනයට තමන්ට ඇති පුරවැසි අයිතිය යොදා ගැනීමක්.

අජිත් පැරකුම් ජයසිංහ හා මාතලන් වැනි ප‍්‍රමුඛ පෙළේ සිංහල බ්ලොග් රචකයන් හරවත් ලෙස මේ සිදුවීම් විග‍්‍රහ කළා. සුචරිතවාදී නොවී, අනවශ්‍ය ලෙස හැඟීම්බර නොවී ජාතීන් හා ආගම් අතර සමගිය පවත්වා ගැනීමේ වැදගත්කම ගැන ඔවුන් කථා කළා.

ට්විටර් යොදා ගනුනේ Breaking News මට්ටමේ අළුත් තත්ත්ව වාර්තා බෙදා ගන්නයි. ප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වයට ලක් වූ ප‍්‍රදේශ හා අවට සිටත්, වෙනත් තැන්වල සිටත් නොයෙක් දෙනා තොරතුරු ට්වීට් කළා.

මේ අතර ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍යවේදීන් ගණනාවක් ද සිටියා. සමහරුන් මෙරට සිට ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට වාර්තා කරන අයයි. සිද්ධියක සැබෑ තොරතුරු තහවුරු කර ගෙන පමණක් වාර්තා කිරීම ඔවුන්ගේ මූලික විනය හා ආචාර ධර්මවල කොටසක්. මා නම් ට්විටර් හරහා ප‍්‍රතිරාවය කළේ මෙබඳු විශ්වාස කටයුතු මූලාශ‍්‍රවලින් ආ පුවත් පමණයි. මෙරට සිටින විදේශ වාර්තාකරුවන්ගේ සංගමය සිය ෆේස්බුක් පිටු හරහා අලූත්ගම සිදුවීම්වලට අදාල ක්‍ෂෙත‍්‍ර ඡායාරූප රැසක් මුදා හැරියා.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හා පුරවැසි මාධ්‍ය ගැන පර්යේෂණ කරන සංජන හත්තොටුව මේ ගැන කීවේ ‘‘ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය කුමන හෝ හේතුවක් නිසා අලූත්ගම ගැන නිහඬව සිටියා. ඒවායේ සේවය කරන සමහර මාධ්‍යවේදීන් සිදුවීම වූ ප‍්‍රදේශයට ගොස් තොරතුරු රැස් කළත් ඒවා ප‍්‍රකාශ කිරීමට මුල් දෙදින තුළ ඉඩක් තිබුණේ නැහැ. ඒ තොරතුරු සමහරක් සමාජ මාධ්‍ය දිගේ ගලා ගියත් බහුතරයක් අපේ ජනතාව සිදුවීම් ගැන දැන ගත්තේ කල් ගත වීයි.’’

ජාත්‍යන්තර මාධ්‍යවලට වාර්තා කරන අමන්ත පෙරේරා කීවේ තොරතුරු දැන ගන්නට තිබූ ප‍්‍රධානතම මූලාශ‍්‍රය බවට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය පත්වූයේ ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය මුළුගැන්වුණු නිසා බවයි.

ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහයේ මාධ්‍ය හා සමාජ මාධ්‍ය අතර බෙදීම බොඳ වී ගොස් බිඳ වැටුණු බව මගේ වැටහීමයි. එය හොඳ ප‍්‍රවණතාවක්. අපේ ජන සමාජයට අවශ්‍ය කඩිනමින් නිවැරදි හා සමබර තොරතුරු දැන ගැනීමටයි. එය කුමන හෝ මාධ්‍යයක් හරහා ලැබේ නම් එයට ඉක්මනින් මහජන පිළිගැනීමක් ගොඩ නැගෙනවා. තොරතුරු අන්ධකාරයක් පවත්වා ගනිමින් ප‍්‍රධාන ප‍්‍රවාහය කර ගත්තේ තමන්ටම හානියක්.

Stand Up Against Racismප‍්‍රචණ්ඩත්වය, ජාතිවාදය හා ආගම්වාදයට එරෙහිව ජනමතය ප‍්‍රකාශ කරන හා සාමකාමී ජනයා එක්සත් කරන තැනක් බවට ද සයිබර් අවකාශය පත්ව තිබෙනවා. සමාජ මාධ්‍ය රට ගිනි තබනවා යයි චෝදනා කරන්නෝ නොදකින අනෙක් පැත්ත මෙයයි.

තව දුරටත් ප‍්‍රභූන්ට හා ඉසුරුබර උදවියට පමණක් සීමා නොවූ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් භාවිතය වඩාත් සමාජගත වෙත්ම ජාතීන් අතර සහජීවනය, සමාජ සාධාරණය හා යහපාලනය වැනි සාරධර්ම සඳහා පොදු ජනතාව දැනුවත් කරන්නට හා පෙළ ගස්වන්නට සමාජ මාධ්‍ය යොදා ගත හැකියි. මෙය අසල්වැසි ඉන්දියාව, පාකිස්ථානය හා නේපාලය වැනි රටවල දැනටමත් සිදු වන්නක්.

අවසාන විනිශ්චයේදී සමාජ මාධ්‍ය හා ඉන්ටර්නෙට් යනු සන්නිවේදනයට ඉඩ සලසන වේදිකා පමණයි. වේදිකාවට පිවිසෙන අය වියරුවෙන් හා අසංවරව මොර දෙන අවස්ථා තිබෙනවා. එහෙත් වාචාලයන්ට දේශපාලන වේදිකා උරුම කොට දී සංවේදී හා සංවර වූවන් බැස ගියා සේ සයිබර් අවකාශය ද අන්තවාදී ටික දෙනකුට ඉතිරි කොට සෙසු අප ඉක්ම නොයා යුතුයි. මේ සයිබර් වේදිකා හුදී ජන යහපතට හා යහ පාලනයට හැකි තාක් යොදා ගත යුතුයි.

සිහි තබා ගත යුතු අනෙක් කරුණ නම් විවෘතව අදහස් ප‍්‍රකාශනයට හා තොරතුරු ගලා යාමට බාධක රැසක් පවතින අප සමාජයේ සාපේක්‍ෂව අළුතින් මතුව ආ ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වැනි මාධ්‍යයක් අනවශ්‍ය රාජ්‍ය නියාමනයට හෝ වාරණයට නතු වීම වළක්වා ගත යුතු බවයි.

අසභ්‍ය හා අපහාසාත්මක දේ සමාජගත වීම වැළැක්වීමට යයි කියමින් ඇතැම් ඉන්ටර්නෙට් වෙබ් අඩවිවලට පිවිසිම අවහිර කිරීම (website blocking) ඇරඹුණේ 2007දී. එහෙත් මේ වන විට ස්වාධීන දේශපාලන විග‍්‍රහයන් හා මතවාද රැගත් වෙබ් අඩවි ගණනාවක් ද අවහිර කරනවා. අධිකරණ අධීක්‍ෂණයකින් තොරව, හරිහැටි නීතිමය රාමුවක් නොමැතිව කරන මෙය සයිබර් වාරණයක්.

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සංවරව හා වගකීමෙන් යුතුව භාවිත කිරීම අත්‍යවශ්‍ය වන්නේ එසේ නැති වූ විට අපේ පොදු යහපතට යයි කියමින් ඕනෑවට වඩා නියාමනයක් හා වාරණයක් කරන්නට රාජ්‍ය තන්ත‍්‍රය ඉදිරිපත් වීමේ අවදානමක් ඇති නිසයි.

See also: 30 Years Ago: How ICTs Are Changing Sri Lanka

BqQN4IxCIAEKHnW.jpg large

 

 

Posted in Blogging, Broadcasting, Cartoons, Citizen journalism, citizen media, Communicating disasters, digital media, good governance, ICT, Internet, Journalism, Media, Media activism, Media freedom, New media, News, Political violence, public interest, Ravaya Column, Sri Lanka, Television, Violence, Writing. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . 1 Comment »

Statistics made simple: Global Village of 100 = World of 7 billion

The Earth is one, but the world is not...


As I wrote the other day, during 2011, human numbers will add up to 7 billion. That is 7,000,000,000 living and breathing people.

But how many of us can grasp such a large number? I can size up a gathering of a few hundred people, or at the most, a couple of thousand. After that, I lose count…and I’m not alone.

That’s why the idea of a Global Village of 100 is so very useful. It’s based on a simple yet profound premise: if we could reduce the world’s population to a village of precisely 100 people, with all existing human ratios remaining the same, what would it look like?

The idea was the brainchild of Donella Meadows, a pioneering American environmental scientist, teacher and writer. She is best known as lead author of the influential book The Limits to Growth (1972).

It was first published in May 1990 with the title “State of the Village Report”, and Meadows originally envisaged a village of one thousand people. This approach to showing the global disparities was so refreshing and accessible that it soon spread among educators, journalists and activists — in today’s Internet terms, we would call that ‘going viral’.

David Copeland, a surveyor and environmental activist, revised the report to reflect a village of 100 and single-handedly distributed 50,000 copies of a Value Earth poster at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janiero.
What happened after that is recounted in this brief history by Carolyn Jones, adapted by Bob Abramms.

The analogy has been revised every few years to reflect the changing demographics and global development trends. The practice is now sustained by the Miniature Earth Project, whose latest animated video version for 2010 runs as this:

There is also the 100 People Foundation (www.100people.org) which is “committed to simplifying and humanizing complex global statistics by looking at the world as a community of 100 people”. They provide media and educational tools to teachers around the world to help them teach a global view, and inspire their students to learn more about their global neighbors. Here’s their own video:

100 People: A World Portrait Trailer


Here’s another variation on the theme, set to John Lenon’s ‘Imagine’:

If the world were a village of 100 people…
This cartoon animation uses the same approach, but with emphasis on linguistic and cultural diversity.

FIFA World Cup 2010: Media Conquering Planet Football!

Most Earthlings have just spent a month on this!

“If you’re an alien planning to invade the Earth, choose July 11. Chances are that our planet will offer little or no resistance.

“Today, most members of the Earth’s dominant species – the nearly 7 billion humans – will be preoccupied with 22 able-bodied men chasing a little hollow sphere. It’s only a game, really, but what a game: the whole world holds its breath as the ‘titans of kick’ clash in the FIFA World Cup Final.

“Played across 10 venues in South Africa, this was much more than a sporting tournament. It’s the ultimate celebration of the world’s most popular sport, held once every four years. More popular than the Olympics, it demonstrates the sheer power of sports and media to bring together – momentarily, at least – the usually fragmented and squabbling humanity.”

This is the opening of my latest op ed essay, which appears in several print and online outlets this weekend. It’s timed for the finals of the FIFA World Cup 2010 – the most widely followed sporting event in the world, which will be played in Soccer City, Johannesburg, South Africa today, 11 July 2010. The Netherlands will meet Spain in this culmination of international football that has been distracting a good part of humanity for a month.

This sporting event is tipped to be the most-watched television event in history. Hundreds of broadcasters are transmitting the World Cup to a cumulative TV audience that FIFA estimates to reach more than 26 billion people. Some TV channels offer high definition (HD) or 3-D quality images to enhance the mass viewing experience.

The essay was written a few days ago, after the FIFA World Cup 2010 had reached the semi-finals stage. To be honest, I’m not an ardent football fan. But as an observer of popular culture, I’ve gladly allowed myself to be caught up in the current football frenzy. I just love to watch people who watch the game…

It’s a light piece written to suit the current global mood, but I acknowledge that the World Cup is really more than just a ball game. The basic thrust of my essay is to comment on the powerful mix of fooball and live coverage: “For the past month, the winning formula for unifying the Global Family seemed to be: international football + live broadcasts + live coverage via the web and mobile phones.”

The Times of India, 11 July 2010: Planet Football: Sports unites a fragmented humanity

The Sunday Times, Sri Lanka, 11 July 2010: Conquering Planet Football

Groundviews.org: Beam Me Up to Planet Football

United Colours of Football, courtesy FIFA

The essay builds on themes that I’ve already explored on this blog – for example, how President Nelson Mandela used the 1995 World Cup Rugby championship to unite his racially divided nation, as told in the movie Invictus.

I also touch on FIFA being a wielder of formidable soft power in the world today, arguably more influential than the United Nations.

Here’s my parting thought, on which I invite reader comment: “On second thoughts, those invading aliens don’t need to worry too much about the Earth’s political leaders or their armies. Without firing a single shot, the globalised media have quietly taken over our Global Village — and now it’s too late to resist! We can argue on its merits and demerits, but the facts are indisputable.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 110 other followers